vaalen
AGEod Guard of Honor
Posts: 1227
Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2007 8:48 pm

A glorious moment, a gift from the game.

Thu Jun 09, 2016 10:36 pm

I had an experience in this game which is an example of why I love, and deeply appreciate Ageod Games.
The description of the battle came from a review of the detailed battle report, and from my observation of the battle circle.

Austria has entered the war on the side of perfidious Albion, and we defeat them before the Russians can arrive to swell their numbers.

We have learned that Austria has an Army at Ulm. It is just within reach of some of our forces, so the Emperor decides to destroy this army before it can get away.

Lannes and his fifth corps is expected to reach Ulm on the fifth day. Davout is projected to do the same, but he will have to force march. No matter, we can rely on Davout, the best general in France after the Emperor himself.

The Emperor combined the Imperial Guard with his Grande Armee command, so he can control them personally. The Emperor, Soults fourth corps, and the cavalry reserve will move next to Ulm, so they will be in position to march to the sound of the guns. Ney will force march to join them there, and, with any luck will get there in time to march to the sound of the guns. This force is considerably more than what is needed to defeat the Austrians. What could go wrong?

As the turn is resolved, Lannes reaches Ulm on the fifth day, wnd is immediately joined by the Emperor and the guard. This force is heavily outnumbered by the Austrians, more than two to one, and the Austrians select an aggressive battle plan, as does France.
The sounds of battle are heard, and soon two thirds of the battle circle is red, as the Austrians commit their larger numbers.

The battle continues. Where is Davout? Where is Murat and the Cavalry reserve? Where is Soult? Where is Ney?

The first two rounds of battle pass in a furious battle of attrition. Heavy losses are taken by both sides, as Lannes fifth corps is decimated. The emperor commits the Guard, who fight like lions but are being worn down by superior numbers.The French numbers are dwindling fast, the Austrian superiority is growing, though they too are taking heavy losses. But the circle is now three quarters red.It looks like the Emperor will be defeated...

Trumpets sound, horses are heard, and these sounds herald the arrival of Murat and the cavalry reserve.The Austrian formations, battered and out of position, break before the Cuirassiers and Dragoons. Murat strikes at just the right time, and just the right place. The battle circle turns completely green, as the entire Austrian army panics as one unit after another breaks and flees before this huge, unexpected charge.The battle continues for the full six rounds, with the shattered Austrians being unable to get away from the French cavalry, their own horsemen broken and fleeing. Enormous losses are inflicted by the Cavalry, at little loss to themselves.

France has won a huge victory, essentially shattering the Austrian army, and getting no less than ten national morale points. The brave fifth corps is decimated, but not destroyed, but will need rest and a lot of replacements before it should fight again. The Cavalry have hardly been touched, and the Guard has suffered moderate losses.

Davout somehow failed to make his forced march, Ney never moved, and Soult did not march to the sound of the guns. No matter, the Cavalry arrived just in time to win the day.


A huge victory, but one in which the friction of war is clearly demonstrated. It is moments like these that give me great joy from Ageod games.

gwgardner
Brigadier General
Posts: 448
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 5:46 pm

Fri Jun 10, 2016 12:35 am

That was fun reading, thanks.

Darthvegeta800
Conscript
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu Dec 03, 2015 10:44 pm

Fri Jun 10, 2016 6:48 am

Yep indeed sounded like much fun!

User avatar
Pocus
Posts: 25435
Joined: Wed Oct 19, 2005 7:37 am
Location: Lyon (France)

Fri Jun 10, 2016 9:02 am

Nice story! It's good when players see past numbers :)
Image


Hofstadter's Law: "It always takes longer than you expect, even when you take into account Hofstadter's law."

RebelYell
General of the Army
Posts: 608
Joined: Sun Oct 17, 2010 4:40 pm

Fri Jun 10, 2016 10:36 am

Bold gamble for sure, you left a lot depending on luck (dice rolls) but came out a winner. :gardavou:

vaalen
AGEod Guard of Honor
Posts: 1227
Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2007 8:48 pm

Fri Jun 10, 2016 3:45 pm

Thanks to all of you for the nice comments.

It was a great deal of fun, and very exciting as it happened. The richness and scope of this wonderful game does have a way of making the period come alive, and I am thankful that we have the chance to enjoy experiences like the one I described.

I knew I was taking risks, but tried to reduce it through redundancy, which worked, barely. Napoleon took a number of risks, and they often paid off, though not always. I must admit that some of the risks I have taken in these games have led to disasters.

User avatar
Lynxyonok
General
Posts: 568
Joined: Sat Aug 30, 2014 11:16 pm

Mon Jun 13, 2016 7:16 pm

What were the game settings? A veteran activation + traffic penalty could have easily frozen your Ney in place while slowing Murat and Davout.

Out of sheer curiosity, have you tried replaying that battle to see what else could happen?

vaalen
AGEod Guard of Honor
Posts: 1227
Joined: Thu Dec 20, 2007 8:48 pm

Tue Jun 14, 2016 1:53 am

Lynxyonok wrote:What were the game settings? A veteran activation + traffic penalty could have easily frozen your Ney in place while slowing Murat and Davout.

Out of sheer curiosity, have you tried replaying that battle to see what else could happen?


I was using the highest activation penalty setting, where some leaders are frozen in place if they do not activate. I was not using the traffic penalty.
Ney was frozen in place, Davout did not successfully force march, and Murat was delayed in his arrival on the battlefield, though that may have accounted for the decisive nature of the victory. Soult was not frozen in place, but never marched to the sound of the guns, though he was in perfect position to do so.

I did not try replaying the battle. It seemed perfect.

Return to “Wars of Napoleon”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests