Topeka
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Mon Mar 30, 2009 1:41 pm

Two weeks vacation? Did he get permission from Ageod Corporate for this?

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Banks6060
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Wed Apr 01, 2009 3:44 pm

I suppose he should have asked! :neener:

Seeing as how we're driving revenue through the roof :mdr: ...juuuust kiddin.

But, yeah we'll be back at it in no time.
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Eugene Carr
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Wed Apr 01, 2009 6:46 pm

He's left Little Mac in charge!
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Thu Apr 02, 2009 5:42 am

Topeka wrote:Two weeks vacation? Did he get permission from Ageod Corporate for this?


This what you call a clffhanger ;)

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Banks6060
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Sat Apr 11, 2009 3:10 pm

Alright...we've got a green light again after the small break from the carnage. Soundoff appears to be back and ready to go with the next turn. I'll be posting the next AAR as soon as I wrap up my turn. As always....stay tuned... :) .
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Johnny Canuck
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Sat Apr 11, 2009 3:23 pm

Banks6060 wrote:Alright...we've got a green light again after the small break from the carnage. Soundoff appears to be back and ready to go with the next turn. I'll be posting the next AAR as soon as I wrap up my turn. As always....stay tuned... :) .


Hooray! :thumbsup:

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Banks6060
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Sun Apr 12, 2009 8:48 pm

[color="Red"]Turn 36, Late September, 1862:[/color]

[SIZE="4"]Richmond falls to Yankee invaders!![/size] (Expected, but discouraging despite it. That's 10 more national morale for my opponent and 10 less for me. That's never good.)

[SIZE="5"]Jackson narrowly defeated outside Charlottesville!![/size]

Image

My take on this may seem overly positive, but it appears to me that Jackson would have had Berry on the run had Franklin not intervened to save him. My troops were far more experienced, had supply wagons on hand, had more guns, and had Berry caught in Assault posture (unless that was just a small part of a seperate command on "Assault" though I wouldn't know why.) The only thing convincing me Berry stood on his own is that NM at the time of the battle would have been quite heavily in Berry's favor...thereby affording him of troops with much higher maximum cohesion AND that Jackson's troops had forced march to the battlefield.

Anyway, It appears to me that Franklin MTG'd to Berry's aid and Jackson, seeing his new disadvantage, wisely withdrew. It was a bloody affair in hindsight. 4,800 more southern troops that will be sorely missed. This will, in fact, be the last offensive sortee by any part of Lee's army for the forseeable future.

[SIZE="3"]Norfolk seized, Southern troops escape capture!![/size] (Also expected, another NM bump for Soundoff, but a silver lining in that I was able to get away with my big guns...some supply wagons and a regiment of infantry. I'll take everything I can get at this point :) ).

So, before heading to my orders for the coming turn. I will take a moment to give an overview of what's been tumbling through my head the past two weeks, since Soundoff left for his well deserved vacation. First, a peek at the Objectives Screen; A grim reminder of the current state of affairs...

Image

In the last 15 days, Soundoff has taken a commanding lead in NM. I still hold a respectable amount among the southern citizenry, but things are only bound to get more frustrating for the populace as further conscription and taxation are likely to be levied for the purpose of continuing the war effort.

The big figure, one which the loss of Richmond only compounds since it served as a central mustering point for replacements, is the disparity in casualties between myself and my esteeemed opponent. I have now lost nearly 40,000 more soldiers than he has. This is a result of my overly aggressive style of play of course (duely noted, I'm quite sure, by observers of the ongoing struggle.)

I am still in the lead in VP's...however Soundoff now holds the "per turn" lead by a considerable amount. Considerable enough to catch up to me in a few months time anyway.

So, we come to the main focus of my dilemma. Somehow, I need to manage a defense of a wide expanse including North Carolina, the coast, eastern and central Tennesse and the Mississippi valley....all with a badly overstreched Army. There is little hope of me delaying Soundoff's advance at any point with the onset of winter only a month or so away. The only place I could effectively delay him through offensive action is in Central Kentucky...it's where he is weakest, but it is a weakness that won't last long. I have not ruled out an autumn thrust into the Bluegrass State to pressure Soundoff into spending more money on the west than furthering his gains in North Carolina and the Coast, but the main problem is that I'll have few assets with which to follow up any success I have. And should I abandon my western Tennessee line of defenses for an offensive in central Kentucky, I will allow McClellan free reign to advance on Memphis and Corinth using the rails to ensure his supply line stays intact.

The game is Soundoff's to lose at this point. That is very clear to me. What I must do for the remainder of this year and into the next...is make him bleed. It will require, at least for the most part, giving up the initiative to Soundoff, but I am quite confident in a number of likely avenues of advance he will take...and can still muster the resources to make taking them a very costly venture. And of course I have my very compitent cavalry commanders (Morgan still incoming) to slow Soudoff's moves along the precious few rail lines leading through the heart of the Confederacy.

Defense in depth is the name of the game. I look at the positives...

- I have PLENTY of loose War Supply to work with
- I still control ALL of my major ports, including the ever important New Orleans and Charleston.
- Soundoff's commitment to Naval operations has been token at best and so leads me to believe he hasn't enough of a navy to undertake major coastal operations...and thereby affords me time to prepare.
- Soundoff has allowed his Blockade % to drop all the way to 10%. Something I will attempt to take advantage of with further blockade runners. (hence affording me of more, much needed, money and WS.)
- I will still have the edge in leadership, at least into the coming campaign season.

The ONLY major challenge facing me as I head into preparations for what I expect will be a spirited offensive by Soundoff, will be conscripts. I will need to be sparing of the number of troops I raise and monitor my use of conscripts very closely, focusing mainly on replacements, support troops, artillery and possibly some naval investment.

Atlanta is DEEP within my territory...and if Soundoff hopes to take it and affect a NM loss (Which I don't think is his first priority at this point) then I wager it will take him at least another year to get there.

Thus, the stage is now set...for what I hope to be a grueling, bloody battle to the end. If all goes well...and enough Union men are lost charging the earthen walls of the Confederacy...perhaps a renewed advance can save the revolution!

Now, on to orders for Late September, starting in the east:

Image

With Jackson's withdrawal, Grant's supply line to Washington is now secure and his army poised for an advance into the Carolinas. Berry's Corps was badly bloodied at Charlottesville and I suspect will either withdrawal to the confines of the Amherst Depot...or stay in place and rest. Grant commands 3 Corps in the vicinity of Richmond and Petersburg (Sherman has an independent command that I expect will be folded into Whipple's Corps) and Hamilton sits outside Norfolk with 3 divisions.

With his army so spread out, so many rail lines broken, and the strong defensive line of my army, anchored quite snugly behind the Chowan and Appomattox rivers, I don't expect a Union advance this turn. However, I cannot deny the possibility of an attack in the direction of Lynchburg...which remains the only nail holding North Carolina and Tennesse together. I see a possible move there by Franklin's Corps, possibly with the help of McDowell...if Soundoff advances...he is likely to face a tired Jackson, but with Longstreet in perfect position to support him. I will force march Jackson's Corp back to Lynchburg and march W.H.F Lee's division, currently under Longstreet, with a Signal Corps and Hospital to join Jackson. a fresh division will hopefully give Longstreet enough time to MTG and repulse any attack Soundoff has planned.

Stuart will continue his return trip to Garysburg, NC to refit (he was delayed by Franklin's Corps as well as his attempts to blow the depot at Amherst.)

Whiting, with a small cavalry detachment is ordered north to cut the rails at Waverly, VA thereby temporarily severing the link between Grant and Hamilton.

General Hoke, with two brigades and some artillery, is ordered to reinforce the defenses of Savannah, GA (One of those prospectives Union attack corridors I mentioned earlier. Taking Savannah would flank my entire position and put Soundoff within a stone's throw of Atlanta.)

Lastly, I have militiamen repairing the rails between Lynchburg and Knoxville, in case I decide to get creative with Jackson before winter fully sets in.

In the West:

Image

McClellan continues to drag down his commanders' activation potential and so poses little threat to my defenses in western Tennessee. Helleck and Sumner command a thick trio of divisions, but Helleck's escape through the mud and across the Cumberland has left his command utterly useless. I suspect Soundoff will withdraw to Bowling Green and rest Helleck, and maintain an effective defense with Sumner.

I will shift some forces around this turn. Sending McClaws' division of Forney's Corps of the Army of Kentucky to guard Corinth. (Hooker, back down in Vicksburg, has some water avenues that lead me to believe Soundoff may try something tricky.)

General McCulloch, with his fresh division with cross the Cumberland river and secure Clarksville and its vital rails. That after repairing the rails west of Nashville.

Lastly, Forrest is ordered to muster with cavalry reinforcements in Nashville. the division I'd hoped to form with Colston was not to be, as he went inactive this turn. Placing Forrest closer to central Kentucky will serve as an advantage anyway. If I can't move into the state with my entire army...I may be able to cause considerable trouble with Forrest. Especially if he has 6,000 cavalry at his back.

In Mississippi:


Image

Hooker has been a pest for far too long. I know Soundoff is probably scratching his head, wondering how to get him out of Mississippi, but without the depot in place at Vicksburg, it won't be long before Hooker runs low on supply. There are a large number of moves Hooker might make. He may drive up the Mississippi river to Memphis...possibly up the Yazoo to Corinth (Although mud will make it a 25 day trip) or, much more likely, a strike at Little Rock, cutting the legs from beneath my defense of Arkansas. Although there is every possibility Hooker will stay in place. I still believe Soundoff is considering an escape by way of Port Gibson, or perhaps down the river to Natchez...this is quite the quandry for me...I can defend several of the escape routes...but not all.

I will send Van Dorn and his small division of the Army of Mississippi to Port Gibson in defensive posture to intercept a move in that direction (Again the northerly escape route around Jackson seems far less likely...especially in the mud.)

Sibley is reinforced at Little Rock, sufficiently enough I believe, to thwart a landing there.

Beauregard will stay put with the army's remaining two divisions and guard the direct approach through Jackson.

And finally, some government action this turn:

Image

Davis, prodded by a continuous stream of urgent telegraphs from his Generals for reinforcements, is convinced to call on Congress to pass a new military spending measure. The Arms for Victory Act is passed with nearly unanimous approval...albeit some rather stiff resistance was offered by the remaining representatives of Virginia and other border states. Davis signs the bill within a few days, and the south begins the printing of new monies to aid the war effort.

The money was needed for what you see below. Another battery of coastal guns will be built. As will several more batteries of artillery across the south. Artillery will be key in my defense at all points. Columbiads...with the "3 damage per hit" stat will be essential...as will the long range Parrot Rifles.

And So

Will Grant strike at Lynchburg?? Does Buell have something waiting in Kentucky?? Where will Hooker move next, if at all?? Stay tuned friends....
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Banks6060
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Mon Apr 13, 2009 1:38 am

Rather troubling news from Soundoff. He apparently didn't send his completed orders and instead an empty .rar file with only the remainder of his Turn 35 movements included.

It is an unfortunate mishap...he says he will live with it. But, unless I'm mistaken, I should be able to get back into the game's files....call up the last turn and redo it.

I'm awaiting Soundoff's decision on what to do.
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Jim-NC
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Mon Apr 13, 2009 2:15 am

Banks6060 wrote:Rather troubling news from Soundoff. He apparently didn't send his completed orders and instead an empty .rar file with only the remainder of his Turn 35 movements included.

It is an unfortunate mishap...he says he will live with it. But, unless I'm mistaken, I should be able to get back into the game's files....call up the last turn and redo it.

I'm awaiting Soundoff's decision on what to do.


Very generous of you to allow him a redo. :D
Remember - The beatings will continue until morale improves.
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Banks6060
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Mon Apr 13, 2009 2:30 am

Jim-NC wrote:Very generous of you to allow him a redo. :D


Indeed. Considering the fact Soundoff has seen many of MY moves, I would not want a simple redo...where we both replay our turns completely.

I'm wondering if it's possible to simply reset the old .trn AND .ord files for the turn...and just re-process them??

I've looked at the Backup files (as I'm the one hosting) and it appears each file contains everything...the .trn, .ord, .hst and .rpl files. I'm just not sure which Backup file is the right one. This may be a complicated endeavor...but I might be able to salvage this situation.

Again...I'm awaiting Soundoff's opinion on the matter.
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Banks6060
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Mon Apr 13, 2009 3:38 am

In my next update. All complications aside. A revelation...that could save the war.

Gold.

Stay tuned...
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cobraII
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Mon Apr 13, 2009 3:50 am

to quote what Soundoff said from his thread, "Trouble is I've loaded the results in and can see what the CSA has done so theres no going back. Ah well totally my own fault." but i leave it to you guys to figure out
Quote General Lee Gettysburg movie,
"Do you see, General, there is the great trap, to be a good soldier you must love the army, to be a good commander you must be ready to order the death of the thing you love. We don't fear our death. But if this war goes on and on and the men die and the price gets ever high. We are prepared to lose some of us, but we are never prepared to lose all of us. We are adrift here in a sea of blood and I want it to end. I want this to be the final battle".

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Banks6060
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Mon Apr 13, 2009 8:29 pm

Well we're forging ahead per Soundoff's request. So on we go my friends!

[color="Red"]Turn 37, Early October, 1862:[/color]

Yanks paralyzed by political squabbles, Grant goes on bender!! (Apparently overly gleeful at their success thus far, the Union takes an entire half a month off...and Grant crawls back into the bottle for a week in Richmond. A little narrative for Soundoff's mishap :) ).

[SIZE="2"]Watie captures Quincy depot in the West!![/size] (Very good news this turn. However blowing the depot will be another matter. It was a bloody little battle. With my indian braves making an all out assault against the scared but steadfast Union garrison. The garrison held after ferocious attacks the first day, but were forced to surrender the second. Around 130 indian braves lay dead or wounded from the fighting....another 300 or so Union troops were killed...with 150 taken prisoner and sent south. The Native chiefs will be happy with their warriors as many scalps were taken! Also much experience was gained from the fighting.)

Confederate sympathizers call for aid in the Southwest!! (just a precurser to a plan I've put together for the conquest of Arizona and possibly...San Francisco.)

On to orders for the next turn!

In the East:

Image

Again, with the flub up I've managed to complete all of my planned maneuvres without loss or hassle. It also means things on the Union side of the line are likely unchanged. There is a possibility this turn for an offensive by Soundoff, though considering his conservative play style I doubt it will come. With around 40,000 troops stationed in the vicinity of Petersburg/Burkeville (probably 3 Corps...perhaps 2) Soundoff could conceivably make a push on Johnson in Garysburg. It would certainly be a bloody affair, with Grant likely taking a good bit of the damage...but Johnson is essentially alone, with only Lee and the HQ to support him and J.E.B Stuart's still tired Cavalry Corps in reserve.

I hope to prevent Hamilton from joining such an attack by cutting the rails with Whiting, who will return to Garysburg this turn. This is the part of my line that I don't want to get flanked on...if Grant opens the road from Garysburg...there's nothing stopping him from taking the entire coast from the landward side. I will keep Joe alone for now, but Longstreet may soon be called to move east in support. Jackson needs another turn to regroup and will hold still in Lynchburg.

However, Jackson will detach the fresh division under W.H.F Lee to mount a campaign against the Union depot at Covington and reenter the valley. As you can see from the screenie...Military control of the valley still belongs primarily to me, which could prove useful in the future. I don't know exactly what i'm going to face there, but I see only one brigade stationed outside the town. It will be a tough fight, being that it will be in the mountains. But I will only aim to push against the outer defenses (in ATTACK posture) and no assault the garrison...which, for all I know, could still be an entire division.

Rails between Knoxville and Lynchburg should be repaired after this turn. Jackson may be introduced to Kentucky soon....

In the West:

Image

Once again, I considered an all out offensive into Kentucky...taking advantage of Helleck's tired divisions, but I eventually thought better of myself. With McClellan's army to my front, a shift of forces eastward would have left the Forts, Memphis and Corinth wide open and with little way of properly defending them. So I have resigned to caution and will wait. However a raid into Kentucky has been planned.

Forrest, with his cavalry outfit now swollen to 6,000 troopers and a battery of horse artillery, will mount trains and make for the Cumberland Gap. There, he will cross into Kentucky and force march to just north of Somerset. If the weather holds out. It will put him in position to wreak havoc along the Ohio River....and possibly take Cincinatti. Louisville is also a possibility.

Buchanan and his small fleet of ironclads, which were withdrawn last turn, will reemerge and keep watch of the mother of all rivers. Doubtless, Soundoff has amassed an impressive river fleet somewhere to the north. He will certainly have to deal with Buchanan if he plans on advancing against Memphis.

A squadron of gunboats will be detached from Buchanan's command to block the river crossings at Vicksburg, where Hooker remains boxed in. (Why I didn't think of this earlier I'll never know. DOH!).

In Missouri:

Image

Watie's troops, fresh of an impressive victory at Quincy, now face a dilemma. with a fresh brigade of Yankee white men only a days train ride and march from their position, they will be forced to fight this turn and may not even get the chance to blow the depot. It is a sad truth, but one that must be accepted. I will try to blow the depot, but if pressed, Watie is ordered to retreat and make his way south to the landing north of St. Louis to rest.

It would appear Watie's raid may be complete. With winter setting in. It's more than likely going to be best to get his indians back to their villages in the territories and await a new year of pillaging.

In Mississippi:

Image

Beauregard begs Richmond for additional troops to deal with Hooker (who has a also a command under Curtis attached) and Davis relents. He orders Holmes, with two third's of his garrison at New Orleans to rail north and join the Creole in Mississippi and destroy Hooker's small, pesky raiding army.

Beauregard and the Army of Mississippi will concentrate north of Vicksburg. Van Dorn will march north and meet Beauregard...then the three divisions will cross the river together and prepare for the assault against Hooker in the following weeks. All together, the concentrated army will bring around 14,000 troops and 45 guns to bear.

Hooker, with around 5,500 tired and hungry men....and Curtis (I believe) with another 3,000 or so horsemen aren't likely to stick around long. I fear Soundoff may try for a gambit up the Yazoo with Curtis's cavalry to take Corinth...I would send a force to counter such a move, but sadly there is no one left to send. McClaw's (whom I mistakenly said was sent to Corinth last turn, he was actually sent to Memphis) is the only one in the vicinity that could make such a move, but Memphis is too important to leave so lightly defended...with Hooker possibly looking to make a move in that direction as well. The gunboats will make things much easier...if they manage to get there in time. Which I don't know. All hopes are on Soundoff keeping Hooker in place for just this one more turn.

And finally...In the Far, Far West:

Image

I was listening to Shelby Foote's Narrative of the Civil War on audiobook last night when it arrived on the section involving Sibley's campaign in the southwest. And it dawned on me that San Francisco is a wealth of $$ per turn. 71 per turn in fact. That is doubtless something which will both assuage the loss of Richmond and possibly force Soundoff to keep an eye westward as well.

Sibley will be charged with collecting the necessary men and equipment in Texas (which will include at least one additional ranger regiment and a supply wagon) and mount his offensive as soon as he can. It will take him through the deserts of the Southwest...but if I'm correct...will land him on a pretty lightly defended San Francisco. It's certainly worth a try...for 71 money per turn.

SO

Will Grant attack Johnson at Garysburg?? What will Forrest find in Kentucky?? Where will Hooker and Curtis turn next?? Stay tuned...
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cobraII
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Mon Apr 13, 2009 8:37 pm

"I was listening to Shelby Foote's Narrative of the Civil War on audiobook last night when it arrived on the section involving Sibley's campaign in the southwest. And it dawned on me that San Francisco is a wealth of $$ per turn. 71 per turn in fact. That is doubtless something which will both assuage the loss of Richmond and possibly force Soundoff to keep an eye westward as well." Banks
Very good book i reading it for the second time. hopefully your invasion with Sibley will be much better then in real life. What ever you do dont retreat thorugh a desert it could be disasterous.
Quote General Lee Gettysburg movie,

"Do you see, General, there is the great trap, to be a good soldier you must love the army, to be a good commander you must be ready to order the death of the thing you love. We don't fear our death. But if this war goes on and on and the men die and the price gets ever high. We are prepared to lose some of us, but we are never prepared to lose all of us. We are adrift here in a sea of blood and I want it to end. I want this to be the final battle".

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Jim-NC
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Tue Apr 14, 2009 2:39 am

Banks6060 wrote:Well we're forging ahead per Soundoff's request. So on we go my friends!

[color="Red"]Turn 37, Early October, 1862:[/color]

Yanks paralyzed by political squabbles, Grant goes on bender!! (Apparently overly gleeful at their success thus far, the Union takes an entire half a month off...and Grant crawls back into the bottle for a week in Richmond. A little narrative for Soundoff's mishap :) ).


Ooh, that is just evil :mdr: I love it.
Remember - The beatings will continue until morale improves.

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Banks6060
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Wed Apr 15, 2009 8:59 pm

[color="Red"]Turn 38, Late October, 1862:[/color]

Sheridan destroys Feyetteville garrison!! (Phil Sheridan marches into northern Arkansas with a division of about 6,000 troops in tow. The garrison was no match. Luckily there is no depot there....Springfield just became much more important to Soundoff.)

Hooker Escapes!! (Unfortunate. Soundoff did just what I thought he was going to do with Hooker, only he didn't go where I thought he might go. In fact I know exactly where Hooker's going and have a little something planned for him. More in a moment)

Grant elbows right, flanks Johnson!! (Soundoff was spot on with this move. Hamilton passes Johnson to the east and threatens the depot at Goldsboro. A depot which would be very bad to lose.

Forrest snowed in!! (Pretty unlucky turn of events with the weather this turn. I still have an idea however.)

Watie destroys Union depot at Quincy, evades counterattack!! (Very good news. it means if Soundoff wants to secure his Mississippi river supply line, he'll probably have to build a couple of transports to rebuild the depot. I'd rather have him spending money on transports than troops and guns.

ON to orders...but first.

A quick comment on how terribly unlucky this turn started out for me. EVERYONE, for some reason, decided to go inactive and so makes operations for the next 15 days very tough. Among the inactive....Bory, A.S. Johnson, Forney and Longstreet. All major pieces to my little defensive puzzle.

So...orders in the east...where things are once again heating up.

Image

Well, Soundoff did well to grab a thouroughfare into North Carolina. The clear terrain around Winton, VA is the last clear region along the coast...it means instead of Hamilton slopping through swamp and marshy terrain to get around my right flank...he's opened a clear (albeit narrow) path. It was a region which I had hoped to occupy with Stuart when his cavalry Corps had gotten enough rest.

Grant has 4 Corps in his immediate vicinity and I expect Soundoff will either push forward this turn...or possibly keep trying to elbow around my right flank with Hamilton (which I would expect more likely to happen). Johnson is in a very strong position in level 5 trenches, with 113 guns, but with Longstreet inactive...and the need to protect Goldsboro...he's going to have to go it alone...unless I'm able to get support over to him in time.

Franklin and Berry remain in the area around Charlottesville with 2 Corps. A problem Jackson will likely have to deal with come spring.

Longstreet, while inactive, is the best defender I have and so will be tasked with holding Goldsboro should Soundoff make his move with Hamilton. Johnson will stay put in his trenches. Pickett, who just arrived this turn, will take 2 divisions from Longstreet's formerly large 1st Corps and march to the aid of Johnson in Garysburg. (I will be forming a new Corps next turn...I have plans to notify Soundoff of this.)

Meanwhile, Stuart will gallop up to Norfolk and seize the city. My intel shows only a regiment of infantry...possibly a brigade occupies the place. Unless Soundoff is able to get reinforcements to the area...it should be a quick victory.

Overall. I think something big is going to happen this turn...I know that Soundoff wants Garysburg pretty bad. Especially before winter sets in...it would put him in a much better position to launch his Spring invasion of North Carolina...so here's to hoping that Johnson can hold out long enough for Pickett to arrive.

In western Virginia:

Image

W.H.F. Lee faces around 3 brigades in Millboro and another small volunteer brigade in Covington. Lee will divide his force in an attempt to take both objectives this turn. The main thrust will be at Millboro and its important depot. It will be a tough fight, but I have Soundoff outnumbered by around 3 to 1...tough part is going to be fighting in the mountains as always. General Lawton, with a mixed brigade of two regiments of infantry, one of cavalry and one battery of 12lbers will move against Covington and take it.

If all goes well...I will further secure my link between Tennessee and the eastern theater. It will be an important link if I hope to make some real trouble for Soundoff in the center.

In the West:

Image

Well, with Hooker evacuated from the deep south. Beauregard's Army of Mississippi is free to protect Johnston's rear in western Tennessee and there is mud from Paducah to Memphis...so....I feel it's about time for that Kentucky offensive. Johnston and the Army of Kentucky will concentrate in Clarkesville,TN and prepare to launch an attack on Bowling Green next turn. Hopes are that a hefty command penalty will negate some of the defensive advantages Helleck will have when Soundoff rails him to Sumner's aid (I'm looking a couple moves ahead now.) Then again....if Soundoff moves Helleck away...it will be even better.

Forrest and his cavalry are ordered to assault Lexington, KY. It will put me within striking distance of Cincinatti next turn...as well as Louisville...which would admitedly be a much more costly prize to take. Forrest will detach one regiment to scout Buell's position.

The AoK will be able to muster around 30,000 men under arms. Many of them battle hardened veterans. If I can compromise Soundoff's position in Kentucky before he has a chance to bring up reinforcements...I may force him to react with McClellan and withdrawl from western Tennessee.

Here's where I plan to put Beauregard's army:

Image

The army is split into two "Wings"...one under Van Dorn, which will rail to Memphis...the other under Bory's direct command. He will guard Corinth. I will need to figure out a way to ensure the two forces can support one another in the future should Soundoff try and attack with McClellan.

Holmes is ordered back to the defenses at New Orleans.

Alot of action in the west now...on to what I plan to do about Hooker:

Image

Scouts around Madison, Arkansas say they have spotted Union transports and droves of infantry debarking on the swampy shores of the white river in their vicinity. I was lucky to have placed McLaws where I did. His division is quite understrength...but it will have to do.

I have ordered him to rail west to Madison and engage Hooker. I failed to note it in the screenie, but I have some gunboats en route to cut off Hooker's escape route. Hopefully I can bag his entire command this turn once and for all.

SO

Will Grant attack at Garysburg...or will it be Goldsboro?? Can McLaws destroy Hooker once and for all?? Don't forget about the coast...What is Soundoff up to around Pensacola?? Stay tuned...
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Banks6060
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Fri Apr 17, 2009 7:31 pm

[color="Red"]Turn 39, Early November, 1862:[/color]

[SIZE="3"]Rooney Lee victorious in West Virginia!![/size]

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(A condensed version of the 3 day campaign to control Millboro and its vital depot followed by the results of an engagement 10 days later.) All in all, a VERY successful campaign by the second son of Robert E. Lee. The scattered Union brigades guarding the mountain approaches to the depot were encountered en masse the first day, resulting in a fierce engagement that saw both sides take considerable casualties...around 430 for Lee and 600 for the yanks. The Union brigades retreated west after this battle and Lee made for Millboro itself and placed it under siege. On Day 2, Lee assaulted with 3 of his brigades and overwhelmed the enemy garrison...taking over 200 prisoners. Day 3, Rooney mopped up around the area...arresting Union stragglers and sending them south...another 200 prisoners were taken.

Lawton's Brigade was never engaged at Covington, but was able to wrestle control of it. All goals of the operation were achieved...a total success...but Soundoff, being mindful of his vulnerability sent Berry's Corps...which I was surprised to see make it all the way. More on my plans in a moment!

McLaws retreats in the face of exhausted enemy army!!

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This was a real grrrrr moment. I had McLaws join to already understrength garrison and apparently the garrison's losses intimidated the General somewhat and he opted to retreat despite the fact Hooker's troops were out on their feet. This was very dissapointing. I was happy about the Union casualties though.


[SIZE="2"]Forrest strikes in Kentucky!![/size] (The action was hot for a couple of hours, but numbers and brilliant tactics eventually forced the Union garrison to surrender. Forrest lost around 480 troopers in the fighting, but took another 200 prisoners. This places him in a strong position, but I may not be able to exploit the breach.)

Kentucky: The coming storm!! (Or so I hope my opponent thinks ;) )

Stuart repulsed by one fifth his number at Norfolk!! (This was quite unfortunate...I only have myself to blame however...I gave Stuart assault orders, but only a "probe" ROE. If i'd pressed home the attack, I'd have probably taken the depot.)

Overall: A good turn for the south. But some troubling developments have caused me to reconsider my move into Kentucky with Johnston. Meade has arrived...and he's brought an entire Corps with him...

First...orders in the East:

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Bad news to start. In an oh so foolish moment, I managed to place Johnson's entire Corps INSIDE Garysburg last turn, thereby rendering their former fortifications useless. I suppose my sub-concious mind REALLY wanted to make up for Soundoff's goof earlier :mdr: . Now my line is considerably weaker...and at it's most important point...in the face of a much stronger enemy army.

Soundoff surprisingly withdrew Hamilton's Corps and instead sent only a single division after the depot at Goldsboro. The sad part is, Longstreet would have badly mauled that division, but seeing the vastly un-winnable circumstance, the leader of that division (one W.H.L. Wallace) wisely decided to retreat...another grrrr :wacko: . The GOOD news is...Wallace has no supply wagons, and sits now in a region blanketed with snow and icey cold...so his attrition losses will probably be significant this turn. I might have a chance to trap him as well. More on that in a minute though.

Grant has his army situated with Hamilton and Whipple facing off against Johnson...and McDowell and Dix at Burkeville. Wagering a guess at his total strength, I'd say he can probably field around 100,000 troops. All of his divisions are fresh and ready for action. So an offensive would certainly not be a surprise. The good part...Johnson will have support.

And so it brings me to my official orders. Edward E. Johnson was ordered over to join Pickett's column and establish the Army of Northern Virginia's 4th Corps command, thereby linking the entire line together. Longstreet will detach one brigade of R.H. Anderson's division to guard Goldsboro and then rail north and hopefully shut the gate on North Carolina for the rest of winter.

Stuart, now bouviacked outside Norfolk after his pitiful effort, will ride south to Elizabeth town and then board transports to Winton, VA. All in all, should Soundoff advance...I will have 2 Corps in place to MTG to Johnson's aid. Here's hoping his troops come in piecemeal. Lastly a note on the hemming in of Wallce which I hope happens this turn. If I manage to engage with Stuart when he arrives...should Wallace retire....It will call 3 different Corps to the battle and could wipe his division out. We'll see.

In Western Virginia:

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Berry's understrength Corps managed to march all the way over from Charlottesville, which puts ol' Rooney in a rather tough spot. Howevere there is one saving grace. Some raiders which I had terrorizing the rails in Pennsylvania and West Virginia arrived in Millboro this turn, just in time to be of considerable value. I have ordered Rooney's division to withdraw to Lexington (a 10 day affair) avoiding any combat the whole way...and have tasked the raiders with destroying the depot. My hopes are that Soundoff over looks the raiders in his attempts to intercept Rooney Lee's command. Blowing that depot would at least narrow Soundoff's supply corridor....and help secure the rails leading west from Lynchburg.

In the West...trouble:

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Well, "The best laid plans of mice and men" and all that. The liberation of Kentucky will have to be postponed (or likely cancelled). You could call it a "head fake" if you wish, but the army of Kentucky, with the knowledge that General McClellan has added a 4th Corps to his army under the able leadership of one George Meade, will whip back to western Tennessee and await the likely onslaught. Polk, with three divisions will guard the center at Henry, TN...Bragg will rail to Humbolt with two divisions and Johnston's HQ.

I see an assault with McClellan's 3 Corps on Henry, TN as most likely to occur. This is because capturing Henry, TN will put the forts at serious risk of being taken...which would be devastating to my defence of Tennesee as a whole. If the forts go...Memphis and Corinth are sure to follow...and Nashville would be utterly indefensable. So I must resign to the reality of the situation and hopefully hold McClellan at Henry.

NOTE: I've been notified by Soundoff that McClellan will soon be losing his army...some more rather bad news.

Beauregard will run up the rails from Corinth and secure the position at Clarkesville. I'll need those rails to have any hope of shifting troops on the defense....and to strike a blow at Bowling Green should that opportunity present itself.

Elsewhere in Kentucky:

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Forrest's troopers, after weeks of forced marching, cold weather and fighting, are well spent. It is fortunate that Lexington alone has sufficient resources to sustain his command for the most part. His cavalry will rest and await whatever reaction Soundoff may have planned....whether it be Buell or otherwise. He will retreat if pressed.

About Kentucky...the good thing is that it's perfect for raids like this. Since most of the rural regions have populations loyal to the Confederate cause, it will be easy to hide from Union armies and strike at targets of my own choosing. It threatens both Louisville and Cincinatti...if Soundoff doesn't spend some resources to protect his rear...then I will be pleased, but very surprised. In looking back, I wished I'd made a stronger push on Louisville from the beginning...controlling the Ohio River would have been a severe blow to Soundoff's operations in the west.

Now...In the area of Memphis:

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I've literally spent HOURS tossing this dilemma around in my head. I have Hooker's command...literally spent...waiting to be destroyed...but I haven't enough Military Control of the region to quickly rail Van Dorn over to assault. It would take him 11 days to get there. I actually got a little bit of a headache staring at this problem. Here are the issues.

1. If I attack, Hooker could just end up gone...off somewhere into Arkansas having blown the rails more than likely.
2. If that happens...It will leave Memphis VERY lightly defended with An entire Union Corps (under Foster) in position to attack next turn.
3. If that is the case...and I've got Van Dorn and his strong division stuck in the swamps of Arkansas with at least an 8 days march to get back to Memphis...I'll be in real trouble.
4. As an aside...I COULD attack with McClaws...but again...that's an entire division that will be out of position should Soundoff move against Memphis. Also, McLaws division is heavily understrength and would probably lose several elements should Hooker's troops put up any resistance at all.
5. Hooker's cohesion has his pwr rating down to a mere 42...so perhaps his troops would all route within the first hours of battle. But that still leaves me with the likelihood that Hooker won't even be there anymore and McLaws will be stranded.

So...What to do...what to do. After a considerable amount of thinking...I've decided that an attack with McLaws is the best option. (Unlike what's shown in the screenie...sorry, this has literally been an up to the minute decision.) I will advance again with McLaws...with intercept orders...it will take him 10 days to get to Madison...I have gunboats en route to hopefully trap Hooker on land. Fingers crossed hard on this one....

And of course we can't forget about the Gulf Coast:

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Soundoff, with Butler's army at Pensacola...is really starting to cause me some trouble down south. Problem being that this is the most direct route to Atlanta. Doubtless Soundoff is aware of this and is sending reinforcements to exploit my weakness in this theater. I have almost NO troops to send to Montgomery's aid....it's only a hop skip and a jump from there to Atlanta...BUT

One must always think logistics when presented with this situation. Supplies will not be flowing in large quantities and if Soundoff decides to continue on the current course north from Pensacola...it will be astride a long and very vulnerable supply artery. I have no doubt my opponent is aware of this fact.

When it comes to supply...a line along water...in many cases if not all...is always preferred over a line along rail. it's unbreakable and if you deal with an enemy's forts and navy...completely secure. So with that in mind, I am keeping a VERY close eye on Mobile. It will be receiving reinforcement...once I have the transport capacity to get it there (using all rail this turn) from New Orleans at first. I will also add a brigade or two to its defense come draft time. Hopefully Soundoff delays his inevitable push against the port city and I'm able to lay a suitable network of entrenchments.

Lastly...I've ordered one of my ironclads north to prevent Wood's division from doing what Hooker did.

SO

Will Grant unleash his army on Johnson?? Can the Army of Kentucky repulse McClellan if he attacks?? Will McLaws destroy Hooker at last?? Stay tuned...
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Have you ever stopped to think and forgot to start??

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Banks6060
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Posts: 798
Joined: Mon Dec 31, 2007 2:51 pm

Tue Apr 21, 2009 8:47 pm

Very sorry for the delay. As I've already informed Soundoff, my work schedule recently changed and adjusting to the new sleep schedule has been a bit rough. But...rest assured, my orders have been completed and I will now share with you what I plan to do for...

[color="Red"]Turn 40, Late November, 1862:[/color]

I will dispense with the update on what transpired last turn. Seeing as Soundoff's update has been posted for quite some time, I'm quite sure everyone is up to speed with what's been going on. I will say however that I was quite perturbed about the state of things in the West this turn...they did not turn out nearly as I'd planned. But that is war. I'll get to that theater of operations in a moment...first.

The East:

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Well, all in all, not much action save a small skirmish between Berry's Corps and Rooney Lee in western Virginia, where Lee was able to slip away relatively unharmed. Soundoff seems content to sit in his interior lines at least for now. A division popped up in Norfolk, I presume to secure it from any further raids by Stuart or others. W.H.L Wallace, much to my shagrin, was able to escape. I expect he will return to his senior Corps formation under Hamilton this turn. Unless Soundoff gets aggressive this turn, which he I think he might.

Considering the fact that it wouldn't be hard for Soundoff to coordinate an attack with his 4 strong Corps in the Petersburg/Burkeville area against Longstreet on my far right flank. I believe it's time I pulled back to a rather more secure position behind the Chowan River and so Longstreet will withdrawl. My entrenched line, marked by the red dashes, will be quite formidable...especially if Soundoff allows me to dig-in all winter. Something I would presume he hasn't the slightest designs of letting me do. This is why I would expect an attack in the direction of my right flank. It would open the gate to North Carolina for the remainder of winter and put me in a very tough spot to defend Wilmington and point south. Here's to hoping Soundoff isn't feeling aggressive.

Re-winding a moment to my defensive line again. As you can see I will have anchored it on both flanks by very favorable defensive terrain. Albermale Bay, a large body of water, on the right....and the Blue Ridge Mountains on my left. You'll notice as well that Grant, with the absence of Berry's Corps, doesn't quite outnumber me 2 to 1....and so probably won't be able to mount a truly effective offensive for some time. All in all, it is a strong defensive position that will only get stronger as my mutually supporting Corps continue to dig-in tight. Knowing Soundoff...I'm sure he has plans to flank me...either by way of the coast...or by way of the mountain passes...the former being most likely. Come draft time, I should be able to counter these threats at most all points along the coast, that is, if Soundoff allows me time to do so...which as I mentioned a couple of posts back...I think he will. I have a feeling that his coastal efforts, along with his navy, are busy down in the Gulf...and won't be paying much attention to North Carolina...at least anytime soon. Which is rather better than the alternative coastal onslaught I would prefer if I were the Union player. All Soundoff need do is seize both Albermale and Pamilco Bays, take New Bern or Wilmington, and he has Lee flanked. We'll see if that's what he plans to do....but for now it's dig-in and hopefully throw back Grant if he attacks.

On another note, and speaking of the Union army in the Gulf. Rooney Lee, in avoiding Berry's troops, will be sent west and into Alabama to provide a stop gap there. More on Florida later though...

Now on to The West...which is again...troubling:

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Well, the cancelled liberation of Kentucky certainly produced what I had hoped in western Tennesse (a dislodging of McClellan's army) but Johnston did not come through for me. Apparently as I railed the army back to Henry and Humbolt, Meade's advance completely took both Bragg AND Polk by surprise and they withdrew. I'm guessing Meade's 125 cannon had something to do with it...I believe there were several long gun batteries attached to his Corps. At any rate...Johnston now sits with the newly dubbed Army of Tennessee (with the draft around the corner...liberating Kentucky is now a mere dream I think) in Henry, TN. It is made up of 2 Corps presently and will remain so in the coming campaign. Although I have detached a division under A.P. Stewart to join Beauregard further east...however I digress.

This was the theater which had me the most puzzled....again. McLaws was again unable to destroy Hooker, Meade takes Corinth, Foster is within support distance should Meade march on Memphis....and mud prevents me from striking north to Paducah. So I was presented with only one viable option...withdrawl. Being that the draft is upcoming...I simply cannot afford the NM hit that would result in losing Memphis. I am fully confident that Soundoff intends to follow up Meade's success with an all out assault on the weakly defended city (Although I'm not sure whether or not he knows Van Dorn is dug in there). With that in mind...I will rail the army's remaining 4 divisions, 2 in each Corps, approximately 20,400 fighting men and some 90 guns to join Van Dorn in the works outside Memphis to await Meade and Foster's advance. Polk will join Van Dorn in the works...Bragg will be left to move and exploit any weaknesses there may be in the enemy attack. Luckily it will only take me 4 days to arrive, being that I can travel there by train...so my hope is that I can be substantially dig-in with around 28,000 troops to Meade's 32,000 or so...only problem being Rosecrans...who could very well rail from Paducah...all the way south to Corinth and then march west in time to MTG to Meade's aid. There is alot that could happen this turn...but most of all...I hope I'm able to hold.

In that spirit...I have ordered the army to "hold at all costs". It is well rested...and fully reinforced...it will likely be able to handle plenty of punishment.

McLaws is in a real tough spot. His advantage against Hooker's very tired and hungry command vanished when a screening cavalry force kept him at bay while the bulk of Hooker's army tucked into the protective confines of Madison just as a blizzard rolled in. Now McLaws will be subject to mother nature's rath...I will rail him over to Memphis...for two reasons...to give him a chance to rest and take on replacements....and to provide a last line of defense should Meade and Foster (and possibly Rosecrans) make it through Johnston's army.

Buchanan and the Mississippi river fleet (which Soundoff has left oddly unaccounted for) will retreat to port and wait for better conditions. Harsh conditions currently persist along nearly the entire length of the Mississippi and will wreak havoc even on the sturdiest of his vessels.

I will also send one newly raised cavalry regiment north to cut the rails at Columbus. If I should succeed in repulsing Meade at Memphis....his only supply route would be severed with the loss of those rails. That is...if he destroys the Corinth depot...which I expect he will.

Some overlapping images here so you'll have to excuse me, but this next screenie shows Beauregard's position in southern Kentucky:

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It turns out my "head fake" by the former Army of Kentucky worked better than I thought. I honestly didn't think Soundoff would give up Bowling Green without a fight...but sure enough...he did. It was odd at first, but given that he was to be outnumbered close to 2 to 1...with no retreat path in any direction (Kentucky is still very loyal to the south)...I suppose it was a wise move. With that in mind, I don't suspect he will attempt to return...for two reasons.

1. He would have to cross a river in the mud...and wouldn't arrive sooner than my troops...and if he did...it would be because of forced march, which certainly wouldn't help him in the case of a battle.

2. He probably sees that Bory has 2 divisions with him and doesn't like his battle odds...however what he can't see is that Bory's two divisions are considerably understrength.

So Beauregard will sally forth with his small army and meet up with his newly formed "Corps"...(more a glorified division) under Forney at Bowling Green. A.P. Stewart is sent west to bolster the army should Soundoff decide to go on the offensive in Kentucky. One issue...this move, combined with the one in western Tennesse will leave Fts. Henry and Donelson completely isolated and vulnerable to attack. It's a risk I'm willing to take...at least for now.

I also have one brigade detached from Forney's "Corps" to march south to Pulaski and repulse and designs Soundoff may have against the depot with Mitchell's small cavalry outfit now sitting in Humbolt, TN.

Also in Kentucky, further north:

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A rather sad state of affairs here as rain has turned the entire theater of operations into a sloggy mess. I had hoped to move Forrest in some threatening manner toward Cincinnatti this turn...he might have been able to destroy the depot before Soundoff was able to get reinforcements there. It just goes to prove that my raid may have been too little too late. That being the state of things, Forrest will resign himself to stay in Lexington another turn. His presence (combined with Johnston's "head fake" ) has pulled considerable strength from western Tennessee (namely Thomas's Corps I believe...if I've kept track of all of McClellan's Corps correctly...I believe he has 4.) So Forrest will stay, rest, and keep Soundoff guessing for at least a little while longer....however...in scouting Buell's force....he has more than enough troops to mount a counter attack and could very well do so...although it's likely he would be slowed considerably by the mud. In case Soundoff tries it...being that infantry, even on the offensive, significantly out-perform cavalry in all stances....Forrest's ROE has been set to "retreat if engaged". If he's pushed back...then it will be on to Knoxville...and any hope of liberating Kentucky will go with him.

Two regiments will be detached, however, should I get lucky, I'm going to get that rail line ready for use. Considering the fact that Kentucky remains loyal to the Confederacy...that I still have a link between Lynchburg and the west....and Soundoff won't be able to call up considerable reinforcements for another few turns....there may yet be a chance for a sustained and swift offensive before winter breaks. Taking Louisville would certainly throw a wrench in Soundoff's plans I would think.

Now in Arkansas, where things are not looking well:

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Phil Sheridan, who has managed to penetrate deep into southern territory without as much of a road block by my forces (save a spirited fight by Quantrill's small army at Little Rock)...it's doubtless he's been congratulated sufficiently enough to be promoted....frankly I'll be shocked if he hasn't.

I've nothing significant to stop Soundoff should he continue his advance. Quantrill, even if he does manage to meet up with that northerly detachment of infantry, will only be able to bring around 3,000 troops to the field. I suppose my only saving grace is that Sheridan's command is made primarily of cavalry...and the last fight had to have cost him dearly in cohesion.

NOW....with all that said. This recent victory by Soundoff has presented a very alarming strategic dilemma. IF he can shore up his far western supply line...Soundoff could easily jump Sheridan down to Vicksburg with nothing to stop him except my navy...which is streched thin already...and furthermore...have a secure line of supply running from St. Louis through Springfield, Feyetteville, Ft. Smith down the Arkansas River to Little Rock and finally to Vicksburg. A far different circumstance than that which caused him to remove Hooker from Mississippi a couple of turns back. To aleviate this threat...I will send the gunboats formerly tasked with blocking Hooker's escape to block the crossings where the Mississippi, Arkansas and White rivers converge. There is one thing I've noticed playing against Soundoff so far...he doesn't pay enough attention to his navies....either river or salt water...I hope I can use this to my advantage as I plan to produce several more gunboats and ironclads over the winter. Soundoff must know, that to open a supply corridor down the Mississippi river....he MUST defeat my river fleet...should he not understand this...i expect he will receive a rather painful lesson...at least I hope.

And finally on to Florida!

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I feel it's high time I start taking this theater seriously. My cavalry scouts under Buckner managed to spot a 4th division under General French in Pensacola this turn. I don't know how long they've been there, but it's clear that Soundoff is committed to making a run into Alabama...or at least it would appear that way.

Rooney Lee will make his way south from Virginia with around 7,400 troops, hopefully in time to stop the more than 15,000 troops Soundoff likely has in the area. No telling how much artillery he has...but there is sure to be plenty. I am also railing Winder and two regiments from New Orleans to bolster the defenses of Mobile. Newly produced coastal guns will remain to aid in the defense of the city.

Buckner's small cavalry outfit will retire to Montgomery...where I expect Soundoff may advance Wood's division. Here's to hoping I'm wrong about that.

Lastly, I wanted to mention that I've invested in 3 additional 12lb artillery batteries in Georgia, for use in the west. Artillery is crucial...and I haven't nearly enough of it. You'll see me build plenty of this in coming turns I assure you.

SO

Will Grant throw his army around Lee's right flank?? Can Johnston stop Meade in Tennessee?? What awaits Buckner in Alabama..total destruction?? stay tuned....
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Have you ever stopped to think and forgot to start??

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Banks6060
AGEod Veteran
Posts: 798
Joined: Mon Dec 31, 2007 2:51 pm

Thu Apr 23, 2009 7:36 pm

[color="Red"]Turn 41, Early December, 1862:[/color]

First, a moment to thank the almight winds of war. What a fortunate turn for the Confederate cause! two major engagements this turn and both luckily turned out to go in my favor. Of course this has left me with the big "what do I do next" conundrum...but, I digress. On to the action!!

[SIZE="4"]Meade repulsed at Hardeman!![/size]

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A thrilling victory. Soundoff was apparently intimidated enough by my army's presence in his rear that he opted to withdrawl Foster's Corps instead of push forward and attack. Though I doubt Foster would have been able to dislodge Van Dorn on his own. It might have sealed my army in southwestern Tennessee and allowed Soundoff to do as he pleased in central TN and Kentucky...back to the battle however.

As you can see, it was obvious from the battle report that Meade was hell bent to seize Memphis. He force marched and was in assault posture. So it was lucky I caught him in the open with my long (and newly stationed) 20 lb cannon. I was able to fire for 2 whole rounds (or is it 3?) before Meade could bring his guns to bear. Then as the action got up close and personal, it appears my troops' defensive fire and assault values did the rest. All in all a bloody battle...by the War Department's calculations Johnston's army sustained 10% casualties (276 killed, 2,070 wounded) and Meade twice that (527 killed, 3,852 wounded). My army was able to rail back to Memphis and rest for 12 days...so I plan to use them again this turn for sure.


[SIZE="5"]A Miracle at Mobile!![/size]

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Now...while it was fortunate I sent Winder with his small contingent of reinforcements...I should NOT have won this fight. Let alone take 500 prisoners and 1,000 stands of arms. If you look at the message log below you'll see my troops routed several times, but somehow managed to take some Union boys with them. I'm guessing (ONLY guessing) that the combination of the coastal guns, fort guns and marshy terrain severly limited Milroy's frontage...and forced his elements to come at me one or two at a time...perhaps a little more. That's the only thing I could see resulting in a win for me. Otherwise....one of the luckiest battle results I've ever seen in any AACW game I've played. Had I lost Mobile....it would have opened up all of Mississippi and Alabama to Union invasion and forced me to committ troops away from the main fronts. Soundoff really snuck one past me in this attack, but I think his troops may be a little too tired to have another go...plus my ironclads are still in the way. It affords me some time to send reinforcements.

[SIZE="3"]Forrest retreats before enemy onslaught!![/size] (Thank goodness for his ability to get away in a tight spot...Buell attacked and Forrest was able to sneak away...alas...in the wrong damn direction! More in a minute.)

First...orders in the East:

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Very little action in this theater. Grant still sits with his vast army in the confines of Petersburg and Burkeville (much to my surprise) and Soundoff managed to get Wallace back up to Norfolk and form a new Corps under....well I'm not positive, but it looks like Crittenden. Franklin was apparently withdrawn to protect the Amherst Depot and Berry remained stationary in Covington (also much to my surprise...I suppose because of weather??)

At any rate...this turn has proved to be the mildest early December I've seen in quite some time. Fair weather literally blankets the entire theater...all along my line...which is NOT good. In studying the front I noticed a vast weakness in my line....the center....which is the worst place to have too few troops. As I have marked on the map...Soundoff has the ability to coordinate an all out attack with all four of Grant's Corps (around 6,800 pwr) on either Johnson or E. Johnston's positions (around 2,800 total). Longstreet's withdrawl, while wise...went the wrong direction as I can now see. With Longstreet all the way over in Winton, VA....his 14,500 regulars (1,000 pwr) are FAR out of position to support my center. It would be much better to have the fast cavalry of Stuart's Corps out on the flank....for if he is attacked...he can call for help as well....being that he's a Corps.

So I will march Longstreet's Corps to Garysburg in hopes of reaching it in time should Soundoff get aggressive (can you tell I've been afraid of him getting aggressive lately??) this turn. I don't see how he could pass up this fair weather...and a chance to strike a blow with his ENTIRE main army. Quite frankly...it's what I would do. Stuart's cavalry will move to Winton and start digging in. It will also put him in a perfect position to grab Norfolk should Soundoff decide to send Crittenden down the coast.

I will also need to watch Berry's Corps. If the weather lets up at all...it wouldn't take much for him to swing around behind my army and wreak havoc in the depots to my rear. I will certainly have to be mindful of this.

In the West:

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Well, as I mentioned. The army is looking good and Meade's boys are deep in enemy territory after a major defeat...are probably suffering from some pretty low cohesion...and have little way of escaping quickly. Mud has socked in most of the theater so neither Foster nor Rosecrans will be able to come to Meade's support. To I will grasp the opportunity while I can. There is no way Soundoff can keep Meade in Corinth and hope to keep him supplied. As you saw in the battle resolution screen....he didn't bring any supply wagons with him...two turns of isolation in the south....with nowhere to run and I may be able to bag all 20,000 of his men. Which would be an immense tip of the scales in the west...and could stall Soundoff's advance deep into 1863....perhaps force him to send Grant west and open up the Eastern theater for Lee to get creative. Many things are tumbling through my head, but the main point...I plan to attack (my favorite!).

First of all, if Soundoff is wise (which I know he is) he will try and find a way out of Tennessee and back to Paducah....being that he's rained in....I see three ways he could go. Directly north through Jackson...Northeast through Purdy....or West back through Hardeman. The kicker...whichever way he goes (even into Jackson) Meade will have to walk. Soundoff took out the rails at Corinth AND Humbolt...meaning there is no way he can rail out quickly (a mistake of potentially drastic proportions). Now...I can cover 2 of the three escape routes....and the two I find most likely are the Northerly and Northeasterly routes. With the Northerly route most likely, being that it is around 50 % Union controlled.

So the army will be split into two Wings...Bragg at the head of one...Polk the other. Bragg's much larger wing will rail east to Jackson...then march south to Corinth. Polk will rail all the way to Purdy and then debark from the trains and march south for the same objective. My hope is...should Soundoff attempt to run Meade in either of these directions....I will be able to intercept himwith one corp...and MTG with the other.

I will set the army to "sustained attack". I've got my blood up now...and if I can bag Meade...I can practically ensure Tennesee's safety for another year...or at least for the beginning of the '63 campaign season. Here's to hoping all goes as planned.

In Kentucky:

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Really not a whole lot goin on in this theater. I will simply shift some troops around. Beauregard has secured southern Kentucky for the Confederacy once again and once reinforced...will have an army quite difficult to break. Soundoff will need to bring up some more troops in Kentucky I would think. He has Thomas at Evansville with 2 divisions....Sumner with another 2...and Williams has a division manning the defenses outside Louisville. The rivers are under harsh conditions...so a quick strike by Thomas is out (I'm guessing). So it's grab the shovels and dig-in tight. Not long till the army will be able to gather replacements.

With my move to Memphis...the forts have been left quite vulnerable...G.W. Smith only hold with 3 brigades...some 5,000 men. Nashville has also been left COMPLETELY undefended. Something which must be addressed. So I will split A.P. Stewart's command and change his marching orders. His main force will head north to join Smith at the forts. His old brigade will be sent east to Nashville.

Forrest is in a real tight spot:

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The clever cavalry commander managed to slip away from Buell, but in the wrong direction...so he will have to fight his way out and gather as much supply as he can (he'll have to pass through the mountains to get back home). Forrest is ordered to attack Ashbury (I think that's the town). He will be able to gather supplies there and make his way south from there....at least I hope.

Lastly...the coast:

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If one stroke of good fortune weren't enough...Granger and the elite Mississippi brigade appeared in Jackson, MS this turn...and so will be sent to shore up the defenses around Mobile. I will probably throw together a scratch division to defend the city. It's importance has been considerably increased with the growing Union presence in the theater.

Rooney Lee continues to make his way south. It will make it a ways this turn. there may be a chance to kick Soundoff out of Florida in the future...but for now...Lee will protect the route north from Pensacola once he arrives on the scene.

Buckner on the other hand, I have plans for. I have no idea where Milroy is...but I assume he's either in Blakely or headed back to Pensacola. If I can take Blakely away from Soundoff (if only for a turn or two) it will allow me time to prepare for Mobile's defense. With that in mind. Buckner and his small cavalry command is ordered to attack Soundoff's small detachment of troopers and take the town....hopefully stearing clear of Milroy's command.

SO

Will Grant advance at last?? Can Johnston trap Meade?? Will Soundoff make a move for the forts?? Stay tuned....
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Have you ever stopped to think and forgot to start??

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Banks6060
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Thu Apr 23, 2009 8:19 pm

Soundoff proved his salt this turn. What an excellent player I've aligned myself against. It was all about maneuvre this turn for sure. I'll try and get the update up as soon as I can...but I'm sure Soundoff will post something before I do (like always).

Late December...and things aren't icing up in the LEAST!
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Have you ever stopped to think and forgot to start??

acme
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Fri Apr 24, 2009 9:48 am

thx for your new AAR!
many times u were unlucky, but often i felt u were just too agressive and inflicted casualties for yourself.

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Banks6060
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Sun Apr 26, 2009 9:13 pm

@acme - indeed. I was and still remain a very aggressive player. But as I like to say in football...sometimes your best defense...is a good offense.

On to the game!

[color="Red"]Turn 42, Late December, 1862:[/color]

Grant misses at Lynchburg!! (I'm sure Soundoff was not happy to see this, the result of his offensive with Grant and the NVA. Grant apparently attacked Lee's position with McDowell and Dix, then swung west to Lynchburg where Franklin's Corps joined the force in an attempted assault on Jackson's trenches. Lee and Jackson both retreated before Grant was able to bring them to battle so it was a bit of a big right hook by Soundoff that missed badly. It gives me an opportunity to counter punch in a BIG way. More on that later.)

Meade slips Johnston in Tennessee!! (When I mentioned Soundoff had a three way road north out of Corinth...it appears he took the road I thought least likely. Great move on his part and now Memphis is quite threatened. I've only a small division holding there.)

Fort Morgan falls, Mobile defenses weakening!! (The "bad news" as far as the campaign around Mobile goes. Soundoff sent a division of around 5,000 men under Hunter to take the fort. They succeeded, but lost around 700 men in the process. My hopes are that Hunter is down on cohesion by quite a bit.)

Buckner takes Blakely!! (And the "good news". Soundoff will need to react to this I would think. It means I've cut off any landward approach to Mobile and trapped Hunter at Fort Morgan...at least for the time being.)

On to orders in the East...where things could get very hot in the coming turn:

Image

As I mentioned. Soundoff took the initiative last turn and attacked...but in doing so, he managed to give the initiative right back over to me. What I really hope is...he hasn't realized it. The weather remains oddly pleasant in southern Virginia and so with Grant's main army, about 3 Corp totalling some 90,000 troops or more, out of position to protect his supply link to Richmond and Washington...I feel it's time to exploit what I believe to be somewhat of an unintended mistake by Soundoff.

While there is a good chance my very knowledgable opponent is aware of how vulnerable his Corps at Petersburg and Burkeville are. I have this odd feeling that with the fair weather...and with the failed attack at Lynchburg...Soundoff's blood may be up and he might try for another shot at Jackson now that he's out in the open. Soundoff can probably surmise that it will take all three of his strong Corps to get a 3 to 1 advantage against Jackson (since E. Johnson would MTG)...so there is also a chance the his two Corps guarding the eastern flank will go unsupported for the coming turn.

With all this in mind. I plan to, once again, go on the attack. IF Soundoff decides to continue his advance on Jackson then it will take 5 days to get to him. I will therefore rail Jackson quickly east to avoid Grant's supposed thrust and then hopefully land a devastating counter blow to Whipple and Hamilton at Petersburg and Burkeville with the combined Corps of Jackson, J. Johnson and E. Johnston. The main complication will be coordinating the assault. I will not be able to get Jackson to Petersburg on the same day Johnson and Johnston arrive, but Jackson WILL be within supporting distance should Hamilton put up a stiff resistance...and will arrive upon Whipple's Corps (hopefully bloodied from Day 12's battle at Petersburg) on Day 13 with Johnson and Johnston in a perfect position to support him.

I am a gambling man as you readers well know. And I know the cost in lives could be high....but allowing Grant to assault Jackson in the open, I believe, could be just as...or possibly more costly...thus I'd rather lose the men in the pursuit of a more lofty goal...the possible re-capture of Richmond.

If I am successful in this campaign...and Soundoff does with Grant what I think he might do....it will put me directly between Grant and Richmond...and Grant and Washington....it will also split Grant's army in two and possibly place Norfolk back under threat. If everything goes as planned...I will force Soundoff to withdraw Grant to within range of his depots at Amherst, Richmond and Aquia...and I will have given myself a new, strong defensive position behind the Appomattox River with which to stall further advances south.

Something I noticed that I thought was rather odd...and that will play to my advantage especially this turn...is the fact that Soundoff has yet to repair ANY of the rails in this theater. If he were to do so....he could easily keep his line secure and would make much less likely and assault of this nature. Perhaps, if I am successful, this will make repairing rails a greater priority for him.

On to the West:

Image

Very little happening in this sector of the war. Although Forrest is in some considerable trouble. His attempt to take Clarksville, KY failed and with significant losses....but his supply situation is admittedly dire and he will try again. The enemy's cohesion is very low...and I believe one more push could knock them out of contention and ensure Forrest's cavalrymen have food to eat.

Beauregard's small army remains in Bowling Green collecting replacements and resting for what will surely be a tough '63 campaign season. Methinks he will need another division to fully match whatever Soundoff plans to throw his way.

G.W. Smith sits comfortably at the forts with around 9,000 men. Soundoff hasn't the resources to take the position yet. This will likely change with the new draft. Soundoff's material advantage will probably begin to tell HEAVILY in the coming year.

In western Tennessee:

Image

Meade escapes to Covington, TN and now Memphis is his for the taking. I must defend the city, for as I mentioned...it's loss will result in a NM hit that I simply cannot absorb at this juncture of the game. IF I can make some magic happen out east...then my NM may be in a better state to take that kind of hit, but right now...I must defend the river city.

Bragg, with around 17,000 men will march through the mud to the north and then board trains in Jackson en route to the defenses of Memphis. R. Taylor currently has around 2,500 troops in the trenches...far less than enough to repel Meade should Soundoff see fit to advance. Polk will remain in station at Corinth to take on much need rest and replacements. Buchannan...who's small river fleet has been resting...will lurch forward to intercept Rosecrans Corps, which is currently making its way down the river...I expect toward Madison Arkansas or Memphis itself?? This will be a key engagement...I don't know if ships are actually able to fire on troops ships....but I'll at least keep Rosy from going any further down river.

Down in the Gulf:

Image

I believe Mobile is safe for the time being. But I cannot rest on my laurels for too long because Soundoff's presence in this theater will only get greater after the draft I expect. Gardner and the Mississippi brigade arrived without incident and will set up defenses with the big guns outside Mobile. The terrain is perfect for defense...I believe with a little reinforcement. It will take Soundoff an entire Corps to take the place. Hunter is in a threatening position to take Fort Gaines...but I don't think he'll go for it what with my cavalry romping around his rear areas.

J.H. Morgan arrived this turn and will get right into the action with his 1,800 Alabama horsemen and 8 guns. He will hopefully hold open the breach at Blakely while Buckner rides east to Pensacola to cause trouble.

Rooney Lee will also, hopefully, arrive at Mobile by river this turn. There will be some reorganization needed there...to strengthen the city's defense.

And lastly...Government Action...I'll let the screenie do most of the talking:

Image

The only reason I opted not to go with a draft this turn is because I want to wait and see what Soundoff will do. Plus I want to save the NM for my attack in the east (more cohesion for my troops....they'll need every bit of it they can get.)

SO

Will Lee break Grant's eastern flank at Petersburg and Burkeville?? Can Bragg stop Meade in Memphis?? Will Hunter attack Fort Gaines?? Stay tuned...
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Banks6060
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Mon Apr 27, 2009 10:38 pm

[color="Red"]Turn 43, Early January, 1863:[/color]

[SIZE="4"]Lee retakes Petersburg!![/size] (A masterful (lucky) stroke against Grant in the east as Lee's army places itself smack dab in the middle of his adversary's line of advance. Hamilton, apparently overwhelmed by the approach of more than 40,000 Confederates (Johnston and Johnston's Corps) withdrew from Petersburg without even firing a shot. I now have solid control of probably THE most important rail hub in the theater with only a hop skip and a stone's throw to Richmond. If that weren't lucky enough....Soundoff did exactly what I thought he might do with Grant and so placed him badly out of position to either advance...or withdrawl in support of his supply line. At least for the coming turn.)

Meade halts before Memphis!! (Apparently Soundoff didn't think Meade had a legitimate shot at taking the city before Bragg got there. I now have considerable enough forces to thwart an attack at that location. However Corinth is quite another matter.)

Forrest can't break yanks at Clarksburg!! (got the town's name right on the third try...sorry about that. But Forrest is in some real trouble now. It will be interesting to see if he can make it out of this little quandry.)

Rooney Lee arrives in Mobile!! (Phew! Now I can reinforce its defense and send some reinforcements elsewhere. Those will be VERY welcome additions to my western armies.)

On to orders for this turn starting in the East of course:

Image

Well, somehow Jackson's line of advance didn't take him where I thought it would...so he remains quite isolated on the army's left flank. Not much of an issue however as I've a very swift method of retreat available (by rail) to the southwest. I've pulled a fast one on Soundoff here and if I don't exploit my initial success I could completely lose the initiative I have fought so hard to gain. The mud will prevent Grant and his 2 Corps from making it anywhere worth noting....he can't get to Raleigh, or Goldsboro...if he could...I'd rail Longstreet over to the defense...but I'm quite confident that he will retire to protect is line of supply....which he can't do speedily either.

If there is fighting to be done this turn, it will be against the Corps of Hamilton, Whipple and Franklin...fully half of Grant's army. While I would love to attack the isolated Corps...I feel it would be a foolish and potentially costly affair so instead I will continue to strike in such a way as to force Soundoff to the north and away from my supply line.

Now, this brings me to what I think Soundoff will do. When I looked at his dispositions from my point of view...I saw a chance that with Jackson so isolated and with Union MC of (that region just west of Burkeville) still at around 30%...Soundoff MIGHT try and attack by rail with Hamilton and Co...with Berry's Corps in support. If Soundoff attempts this it will be QUITE fortunate, for Jackson will be able to avoid combat easily...HOPEFULLY that's what Soundoff decides to do. However I see it as more likely that Soundoff will begin to retreat to Richmond with all 3 Corps. Berry will probably be railed over to protect Burkeville and Grant will likely rush northward as fast as he can with what remains of the army.

Quite clearly you can see I have an open road all the way to Washington...what with the nasty weather, I would seriously be contemplating an all out invasion at this point. The political cost of losing both Richmond and Washington...could put Soundoff's armies in such a cohesion quandry that they'd be easily dispersed on the field should it come to that. However I will have to settle for more "jockeying" this turn. If I can put the meat of my army between Hamilton and Richmond, I will at least be able to keep the initiative and force Soundoff to continue his retreat.

I will be repairing all of the rails between Garysburg and Petersburg this turn so as to provide a swift line of advance for all of my remaining Corps next turn. If I can take significant control of the rails leading to Richmond, I will put Soundoff's army in a real tough spot. To this end, I have ordered J. Johnston's 5 veteran divisions (around 30,600 troops and 115 guns) to forced march north and seize the rails between Richmond and Petersburg. Johnston will arrive on day 10 as will Hamilton's troops should they forced march (which I expect they will).

In concert with this move, I have Longstreet's small Corps railing north and arriving in Petersburg on Day 10. He will take over command of E. Johnston's 2 divisions (for a total of 3) and hopefully provide the support J. Johnston will need come the day of battle...(about another 25,000 troops). Jackson will rail southwest, then march east to Goldsboro. Placing him in a good position to strike next turn.

All guesses point to Hamilton's command humping it back to Richmond as fast as it can....and Grant making for Burkeville in the same fashion with Berry in support. I can't take Richmond this turn...but next turn will really tell the tale. If I can keep Soundoff's armies seperated...I should be able to defeat them one by one in the field.

I sense a large battle with Hamilton this turn...I will hopefully be able to repulse him and thereby open the road to Richmond and more specifically, Amherst and Aquia...both prizes of increasing importance to Grant's operational needs in Virginia.

On to things in the West:

Image

Very quiet. Only some administrative things to go over here. The NEW Army of Kentucky, now under Beauregard, will need to be strengthened I think to deal with what I expect to be a full onslaught from Soundoff's newly drafted divisions in the West. He knows his center is the weakest part of his grand strategic line...and I fully anticipate he will reinforce it considerably. With that in mind, I have added G.W. Smith's command to the army as its second "Wing". Beauregard sits in Bowling Green with the right "Wing".

Forrest is in a real tough spot up in northeastern Kentucky. He's very close to running out of food. He's out of bullets. So another assault on Clarksburg is called off and his command is sent north to gather supplies at the landing west of Ashton (??) West Virginia. This is going to be a tough winter for those troopers. Hopefully they can handle it.

In western Tennesee:

Image

No movement in this theater. What I'm a little afraid of is a stroke by Meade to take Corinth (again). Polk's small Corps is vastly understrength, though I hope recently aquired replacements will asuage this situation. Should Soundoff fail to advance this turn. I will begin construction of a new depot there.

My Mississippi river fleet will withdrawl to Memphis...they regrettably weren't able to intercept Rosey's troop ships. grrr.

In the Gulf:

Image

Rooney Lee arrives just as scheduled (Day 15). Hunter's division has left the defenses of Fort Morgan and moved back to Pensacola. It would allows me an opportunity to retake the fort...but I'll leave it alone for now. I need all the troops I can get to defend mobile itself. I will reorganize Gardner's command to include some 6,100 troops with some stationed inside the city. Three other brigades will move to reinforce Vicksburg should Soundoff get aggressive with either Hooker or Sheridan.

Morgan is in no position of advantage. I considered an assault on Fort Morgan....but cavalry against the big guns would be utterly futile. So I will withdrawl his command to meet up with Buckner's retreating troopers at a landing to the north.

This theater is quite secure for now. However Soundoff's full draft will probably change that.

And not to forget about our friends in Texas:

Image

After much consideration...I have decided to send a more talented (more readily active) general to lead the expedition to San Francisco. General Wharton, who's statistics rival all of the best Confederate Cavalry commanders, will take command....he awaits only a unit of supply before waiting for the weather to clear up. Then it's west to the riches of California. Gold that will hopefully fill an ultimately victorious Confederate treasury.

Lastly:

I have ordered the construction of 4 more ironclads along the east coast. I will wait one more turn for the draft...to see what kind of position I am able to gain in respect to re-capturing Richmond next turn. If I can retake the city...It will put my government in a perfect position to call for another draft. (i.e. I will be able to afford the NM hit.) Plus it will even the NM odds considerably.

SO

Will J. Johnston be able to stand against Hamilton?? Can Forrest survive the rugged terrain and frozen weather in Kentucky?? Will Meade strike in western Tennessee?? Stay tuned....
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Have you ever stopped to think and forgot to start??

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slimey.rock
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Wed Apr 29, 2009 1:05 am

Very well Done! You have definitely earned this turn of events. Hopefully luck won't turn a blind eye to you this time :)

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Banks6060
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Wed Apr 29, 2009 8:17 pm

@slimey.rock - Thank you friend. I have been quite lucky the past few turns and as you will see I'm trusting old lady luck to carry me through at least one more campaign. Read on, read on.

[color="Red"]Turn 44, Late January, 1863:[/color]

Quite honestly there isn't much going on except my success in the east, and I have planned a daring operation so I'll get straight to it and just stick with only that. What you are about to read easily trumps my first campaign against Amherst....

Image

When looking at the current turn I was at first quite jubilant at my success. Hamilton did not advance (or withdrawl I suppose) like I had thought and J. Johnston was able to get between Grant's army and Richmond without a hitch. Soundoff did in fact try to catch Jackson, with Berry's Corps in the lead, but the cunning Stonewall managed to escape. Soundoff's army is now spread out considerably over a large area that remains quite isolated from its bases of supply, Burkeville being the exception.

However once I fully processed the turn in my mind I began to despair. I may be able to seize Richmond with my exploits, but damn it all to hell, there would be NO way I could conceivably hold it with Soundoff's army in perfect position to just cutoff my line of supply to the Carolinas (i.e. his supply line running from Amherst to Burkeville to my west). With my success, has come a heavy sense of forboding. Looking ahead, it will only be a matter of time before McDowell and Dix are able to rest (likely at Amherst) and Soundoff is able to bring his entire army to bear against my own...even WITH strong entrenchments he will still have enough Corps to maneuvre around my lines and make holding Richmond an absolutely fruitless venture, unless I wish for Lee's army to starve. So it has given me no choice. I must venture to destroy Grant's army, or at least as much of it as I can, by cutting off HIS line of supply north and allowing the coming winter weather take care of the rest. Oddly, and albeit fortunately enough, The weather is fair across Virginia, I still have the initiative, I have plenty of supply in wagons for at least the next few turns and I'll be moving in friendly territory...so movement, supply, and lines of retreat won't be an issue...at least for the next turn or so.

So I will embark on the most daring campaign yet....

Lee, with three Corps, under Longstreet, Jackson and his largest under Johnston, (around 65,000 total troops) will strike north in another attempt to seize the depot at Amherst. My eternal hope is that Soundoff is also sending McDowell and Dix there to rest thereby allowing my fresh troops an advantage over his, which have been slogging through the mud in North Carolina and struggling through low supply for the last month. If I can strike and strike hard...I might be able to render those two Corps useless...then turn on Hamilton and Franklin to the south....or simply let them starve...or as I hope...retreat and allow me to operate freely around Virginia, reversing all of Soundoff's gains of the past campaign year.

General E. Johnston, with Magruder (and Magruder is the key) and two newly arrived "event generals", each with ONE BRIGADE will form a Reserve Corps to take and hold Petersburg. The key being Magruder's ability to increase a stack's hide value once it is entrenched. I have yet to test this little tactic. Adding to this, reinforcements I have railing northward from Wilmington, Goldsboro and New Burn this turn (some 10,000 in all) I will hopefully fool Soundoff into thinking there is a strong 3 division Corps still sitting outside Petersburg.

The main risk...and potential wrench in my plan. Soundoff holds Norfolk. If I achieve success at Amherst, Soundoff will likely try and slice through my positions at Petersburg to link up with his coastal supply base at Norfolk and therefore render the entire effort useless (though Norfolk probably won't be able to forward near enough supply even for a 60,000 man army...at least that's what I'm betting on.)

Jackson, who currently defends outside Garysburg, will rail north and then force march to Amherst, arriving in 11 days. He will have the assistance of Lee and the HQ which will arrive on the same day. When looking at all possible Union approaches to Amherst, this will put Jackson at the depot 1 day before any of Soundoff's Corps can get there (providing of course Berry, Hamilton or Franklin's Corps don't forced march there). Jackson, ordered to defend at all costs, will hopefully build up enough Military Control to allow him to stay in defensive posture and hold long enough until day 12....when Longstreet and finally Johnston's massive Corps are able to arrive on the field in support. Johnston's Corps will "assault at all costs" so as to seize any troops Soundoff may have inside the depot...and more rapidly increase my Military Control of the region...Longstreet will also be placed on "defend at all costs" stance. What I hope is to be able to force Soundoff's stacks into the attack...thereby allowing my troops to use their superior defensive fire numbers against Soundoff's tired troops' offensive fire numbers.

I'm throwing everything into this operation...and its success could mean the slow and steady destruction of Grant's army in the east. I am relying on a whole lot of uncontrollable factors. Here's to hoping all turns out well.....
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Have you ever stopped to think and forgot to start??

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Prussian Prince
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Thu Apr 30, 2009 12:17 am

Ballsey....Hope it works! :thumbsup:
Player of many Ageod Games : AACW, ROP, BOA2 and PON!

Beta Tester for EU2 and HOI3:thumbsup:

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Jim-NC
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Thu Apr 30, 2009 3:03 am

Good Luck on a several large gambles.
Remember - The beatings will continue until morale improves.

[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

acme
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Thu Apr 30, 2009 2:18 pm

lol u are really very aggressive..
i fear u maybe cut from home if soundoff takes petersburg behind u.

but i agree u need to take risk to turn the tide.
good luck. :cool:

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Banks6060
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Fri May 01, 2009 9:10 pm

Thanks for all the support fellas :D . It turns out a LITTLE luck was thrown my way, but things went NOTHING like I thought they would. with that....

[color="Red"]Turn 45, Late January, 1863:[/color]

Well, somehow...and I have no idea how...my line of advance shifted to include Appommatox. Which was not in my original plan at all. Add to that what I feared most...the movement of Hamilton and Franklin to the area instead of McDowell and Dix. I was pretty frustrated since it lead to this bloody affair...

[SIZE="3"]Jackson stands against Union onslaught at Appommatox!![/size]

Image

Technically a defeat for the Confederates, but Jackson took the "defend at all costs" quite literally...standing before a vastly superior force despite some rather lax support from Johnson's Corps. From what I can gather from the message log, it appears Johnson MTG'd and then (likely using his "evader" trait) disengaged, leaving Jackson to stand against the combined onslaught of Hamilton and Franklin until finally he forced them from the field...it was a valiant defense against seemingly insurmountable odds for sure. But to top it all off, Jackson continued his advance to Amherst, where Franklin and Hamilton passively observed him dispatch the cavalry guarding the depot and capture it!

As I have outlined in the battle report...Soundoff's Rodman's doubtless took a HEAVY toll on my troops, who were defending in clear terrain, without any significant cover. Rodman's are the games deadliest artillery...even on the offense...needless to say, I wished I had been fighting in Amherst...because (I'm pretty dang sure) it's at least wooded terrain and so reduces the maximum engagement range by 1. Otherwise...as you can see, once the troops closed to within musket shot, things got deadly VERY fast. Jackson's shattered Corps lost around 13,000 troops in all...around 65% losses. Hamilton's Corps was badly mauled according to my intel after the battle....Franklin was hurt, but still remains somewhat combat effective.

[SIZE="3"]Richmond back in southern hands!![/size] (A great boost to NM...but I fear a short lived one. There is little way I'll be able to hang on unless some things really go my way. I'll get into those in a moment. It HAS allowed me to call for the draft though.)

[SIZE="2"]Meade takes command!![/size] (McClellan has been relieved of command. Meade has taken over in the west. I think it compounded Soundoff's NM troubles and now things sit very evenly.)

To orders! In the East:

Image

Well the snow has returned, blast. I should have expected it, but it's frustrating non-the-less. It means good things and bad things. The good thing...Hamilton and Franklin...don't own the Amherst depot...Jackson does...so technically it will be THEIR commands that suffer from snowborn attrition this turn and not mine. Actually...I earnestly hope Jackson's force is able to collect at least some replacements before he is ejected from the area, but that is unlikely since he will be moving.

The bad thing...Johnson's Corps will get hit hard too.

In surveying the turn, my dispositions wound up being rather advantageous. I've captured Amherst depot (again) Johnson sits directly astride Grant's path of supply, Burkeville's stock is probably pretty low...and McDowell and Dix's Corps are still recovering from their long mud march out of North Carolina. All in all, were my army in better shape...it would be time to make the final strike against Grant's tired troops and hopefully send Soundoff reeling back to the north. Alas, it is not to be. While Soundoff's army, on the whole, is in a much sadder state of affairs with regard to cohesion...I've only 5 fresh divisions I could throw against Grant this turn...an assault that would more than likely fall against defenders who will be set to fight to the last man. Lee's army cannot bear a second battle like 2nd Appommattox and so I must withdrawl and rest.

Another bad thing. After Jackson's heroic effort to take Amherst, word came from spies in and around Washington that an entire Union Corps...possibly another 20,000 men, was massing in Washington. It was as if all the toil, the blood of the past days' fighting had been for nothing. The Union machine is in full gear now. The initiative must be handed to Soundoff as my army MUST rest and take on replacements in order to absorb what will likely be Soundoff's overwhelming counter thrust.....besides that...I need to send my coastal garrisons back to their posts...Soundoff has completely ignored his brown water operations along the east coast and I cannot believe that will last all the way into 1863.

So...Johnson is ordered to withdrawal to Petersburg, part way by rail, once there he will take shelter within its defenses and recover cohesion. Jackson is ordered to march east to Richmond...however...I expect he will come under attack by what remains of Franklin's Corps...I have ordere Jackson to "retreat if engaged"....and (in a rather gamey move, but one that MUST be done) I've left a small brigade inside Amherst depot to blow it should Soundoff neglect to put his Corps in "assault" posture. This one last little bit of fortune would place Grant's army in quite the trouble spot...as he would either have to order up more supply wagons for a new depot...or retreat.

A quick note: Soundoff, oddly enough...NEVER seems to use railroads for his supply lines. At least he hasn't in the east. There are rails in Virginia that have remained broken since 1861...I cannot understand the logic behind this, but it's certainly allowed for my most recent success and has placed Soundoff in the supply conundrum that currently exists. Had he placed a depot at Fredricksburg, or Charlottesville...then Lynchburg to Burkeville...he would still have a secure supply line. It is odd...but as Napoleon said "Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake."

J.E.B Stuart will rest and repair the rails in Richmond for now...Kearny has been spotted rampaging in North Carolina, it would seem, with is eyes on Goldsboro's important depot and so will likely call for Stuart's services soon.

In the West:

Image

A theater which remains very much in doubt for my esteemed opponent. Methinks he may be getting a little overconfident in his line of supply to Cairo...which currently doesn't exist. His army isn't drawing supply from the Mississippi River, for Covington, TN has no port...and the rails...(again...so strange) remain broken at Humbolt, TN, Meade's only rail supply line north to Paducah. Again...I don't understand. Either Soundoff doesn't comprehend the supply system in the game, or he's found some other way of supplying his troops that I don't know about. Being that as it may, Rosecrans Corps has only little supply at present...and if he doesn't withdrawl to a closer line...his troops will melt away.

Perhaps Soundoff plans to build a depot in Humbolt?? Whatever it is...it appears clear that he either THINKS he's getting supply from the river...or he really prefers the "overland road" supply routes to the more efficient (while admitedly vulnerable) rail supply routes.

On top of that...he's left Paducah almost completely un-garrisoned. Foster's Corps left the town last turn and only a brigade sits there now. I don't know if he's baiting me...but I will be keeping my eye on it. For now, I will wait an see what materializes at Paducah and if Soundoff doesn't bring up a proper garrison...it may call for a "raid in force" next turn. Taking and destroying the Paducah depot...then holding it...would place Meade's ENTIRE army in a supply quandry utterly dwarfing that of Grant. He would be forced to retreat back to Columbus at the very least to recieve ANY supply whatsoever from Cairo. Again, puzzling as hell...but I'll let things play out as they may and await what forces show up in Paducah this turn.

Taylor's understrength division will reinforce Polk's Corps this turn along with around 4,500 troops, formerly of Rooney Lee's division. This will put the Army of Tennessee up close to 40,000 men once all replacements are gathered.

Beauregard's army continues to swell. he now has around 15,000 troops in Bowling Green....with G.W. Smith's wing of the army remaining strong at 8,500.

Oh...a very sad report about Forrest (who I have purposefully neglected to mention). His command has literally just melted away in the face of the Kentucky winter. He now commands around 325 troopers....a mere skeleton of his orignal 6,000 man cavalry army that saw its way to Lexington in October and November. It's a terrible loss....as the cavalry will definitely bee needed in the coming campaign. I hope to get Forrest and whatever remaining troopers I can, back to Knoxville with all haste....I fear however...his troops will not last.

Some Government action this turn and a glance at the overall picture:

Image

Draft time! The NM boost after taking Richmond allows me to call for a full draft and to call for more war funding. My interest rate will skyrocket to 30%....my NM will drop to 100....but both are sustainable...and needless to say...both are necessary.

Reinforcements include:

3 brigades in Tennesse (here's to hoping they don't show up west of the Tennessee River, where Meade's army is.)

2 small Alabama brigades

1 Mississippi brigade

1 North Carolina brigade

3 militia in Virginia (garrisons for Richmond and Petersburg)

3 Tennessee cavalry regiments (Forrest will need more meet for his grinder)

3 12lb. batteries for Holmes' coastal defenses at New Orleans.

Also, as I mentioned...several more Ironclads for defense of the east coast ports....Soundoff's naval attention has been severely lacking and I really hope I can gather considerable naval strength to repel him should he send his ironclads and wooden ships against Wilmington, Charleston and Savannah.

SO

Can Gregg's small brigade blow the Amherst Depot?? Can Jackson get away without being destroyed?? Will Soundoff send reinforcements to Paducah?? stay tuned....
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Banks6060
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Joined: Mon Dec 31, 2007 2:51 pm

Sat May 02, 2009 12:35 am

A quick moment for an aside on MTG and spreading one's army out too much.

As you have already seen in this particular game...there have been several examples showing WHY it is ill advised to seperate one's army over too large an area...in fact spreading your Corps out at all can prove to be quite dangerous if your enemy mounts a concentrated and coordinated attack at a one of the "pieces" of your line.

Example 1:

Though it ended up leading to what was a successful offensive for me, Soundoff's original attack by Grant, McDowell, Dix and Franklin into North Carolina against Lee and Jackson's positions showed just why a line made up of mutually supporting Corps can be exploited quite easily. Lee...who was in solid entrenchments...in 100% Confederate MC'd area...would conceivably have called on E. Johnston and Jackson to MTG to his aid...alas...it did not happen. Why?? I believe the answer lies in the face Lee was simply overwhelmed...and decided instead to withdrawl and spare his troops. The same goes for Jackson....who was at Lynchburg...in level 6 trenches...even with 3 to 1 odds, he would conceivably ( i like that word :) ) been able to hold....but Grant's numbers were simply too much and it forced him to automatically retreat.

EXAMPLE 2:

When I attacked Hamilton at Petersburg. The initial strike would have had Hamilton at a 3 to 1 disadvantage and so he retreated to Burkeville in the face of an overwhelming enemy advance. Once again...at the point of attack...if you can bring enough strength to bear on the attack...it won't really matter whether or not any other Corp are within range to MTG. It would seem more often than not...the defender will invariably retreat in the face of a strong and determined attack...unless place on "defend at all costs".

EXAMPLE 3:

The Battle of Appomattox...Johnston MTG's, but plays only a small role in the fighting...and then promptly retreats. Had he been IN the region with Jackson...it's likely he would have held the line and caused a major defeat for Hamilton and Franklin.

In conclusion....keeping your troops TOGETHER, in the same region has the advantage of guaranteeing your position is strong...and that all of your Corps will fight together.

I think it has been proven that attacking a piece of the enemy's line with an overwhelming force...AT the point of attack...despite whether or not the defender has Corps within MTG distance...will more often than not, allow the attacker to gain the position. I hope I'll be able to show this more as the game continues.

Cheers all!


EDIT: A final note...as I've delved deeper and deeper into the mechanics of MTG...it would seem that MTG Corps operate in more of a "support" role during battles...rather than a permanent fighting force. At least it would seem that way.
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