ahall0007
Conscript
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri Aug 29, 2008 3:41 am

Fort Pillow Incident

Fri Aug 29, 2008 4:23 am

One thing about Forrest is that he lost control of his men at Fort Pillow and they massacred men under a white flag after the fort had been captured. I don't know if there is an available character trait but the Union did not trust Forrest's flags of truce after that event in 1864.

Other than that, he was a great general.

User avatar
Jabberwock
Posts: 2204
Joined: Thu May 31, 2007 12:12 am
Location: Weymouth, MA
Contact: ICQ

Fri Aug 29, 2008 9:39 am

ahall0007 wrote:One thing about Forrest is that he lost control of his men at Fort Pillow and they massacred men under a white flag after the fort had been captured. I don't know if there is an available character trait but the Union did not trust Forrest's flags of truce after that event in 1864.

Other than that, he was a great general.


It's a controversial event, just like the St. Louis massacre. Eyewitness and non-eyewitness (there were a lot of those) accounts differ. By some accounts, Forrest was a few miles away when it happened. Sherman's opinion was that it was mainly propaganda.

You are absolutely correct that black troops were told to expect no quarter from Forrest after that.
[color="DimGray"] You deserve to be spanked[/color]

Image

User avatar
Daxil
AGEod Grognard
Posts: 849
Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2008 7:55 pm
Location: Somewhere in the Alleghenies

Sat Aug 30, 2008 4:22 pm

Sherman's opinion was that it was mainly propaganda.


Hehe Sherman seemed to secretly love Forrest based on all the "That Devil Forrest" quotes he had about the man.
"We shall give them the bayonet." -Stonewall at Fredericksburg.

User avatar
Barker
Major
Posts: 209
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2008 7:05 pm
Location: Walterboro, South Carolina

Tue Sep 02, 2008 5:03 pm

My GG Grandfather served with Forrest. 4th Alabama Cav. From what my Grandfather said he had nothing but praise for him....he was bent on victory and to show them what for if they come to us...that was an actual quote. Forrest was a great General in Cav Raider Tactics, Ambush overall disruption of supplies. He was an innovative tactician when he persued the Union Cav through Moulton and whipped them good. There was many atrocities of that during the war on both sides but it was more at a company to regiment level and basically not division wide I think. I could be wrong.

User avatar
Jabberwock
Posts: 2204
Joined: Thu May 31, 2007 12:12 am
Location: Weymouth, MA
Contact: ICQ

Tue Sep 02, 2008 5:48 pm

Barker wrote:4th Alabama Cav.


That's cool. Roddey's or Russell's regiment? Do you know? They were both called the 4th Alabama Cav., and both fought under Forrest at different times and places.
[color="DimGray"] You deserve to be spanked[/color]



Image

User avatar
Barker
Major
Posts: 209
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2008 7:05 pm
Location: Walterboro, South Carolina

Tue Sep 02, 2008 5:51 pm

Both Actually, He was in Newsome's Company. He was in Roddy's and Russell's. Fought through till selma, paroled at Pond Spring. They were a tough outfit....they really took care of each other

User avatar
Barker
Major
Posts: 209
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2008 7:05 pm
Location: Walterboro, South Carolina

Tue Sep 02, 2008 5:56 pm

First recruited by Col. Phillip Dale Roddey, "Roddey's Cavalry" later became under the immediate command of Col. William A. Johnson, following Roddey's promotion to General. This quick riding unit, operating in close association with Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest, was assigned many semi-independent missions and was known for it's "disappearing habits" after hitting the enemy.


"If I ordered him to go to Washington and take his regiment... Hell could not stop him."---Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest (commenting on Col. Johnson's command)

User avatar
Barker
Major
Posts: 209
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2008 7:05 pm
Location: Walterboro, South Carolina

Tue Sep 02, 2008 5:58 pm

4th Alabama (Russell's) Cavalry Regiment
Russell's 4th Alabama Cavalry Regiment was formed at Murfreesboro, TN in December 1862 by a consolidation of four companies from Nathan B. Forrest's Old Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, and six companies from the 4th Alabama Battalion. (Recruits were from Cherokee, Jackson, Lawrence, Madison, Marshall, Monroe, and Wilcox counties). Forrest's old companies had been with him for 15 months and had fought at Fort Donelson, Shiloh, and many other engagements. Shortly after its organization, the regiment was sent with Forrest on a raid into west Tennessee, fighting in the battles of Lexington, Trenton, and Jackson. It also served in John T. Morgan's and William Wirt Allen's brigades, at Parker's Cross Roads, and Chickamauga. It also was in the Knoxville and Dalton-Atlanta campaigns. Later it skirmished in the Tennessee Valley and served under Gen'l James R. Chalmers in Alabama. After the Battle of Nashville, the 4th was assigned to Forrest's Corps and was included in the surrender on 4 May 1865. Col. A. A. Russell was twice wounded and was early placed in command of a brigade, thus the regiment was under the command of Lt. Col. Joseph M. Hambrick.

Field and staff officers: Col. Alfred A. Russell (Jackson County; wounded, twice); Lt. Col. Joseph M. Hambrick (Madison County; wounded, Calhoun, GA); Major F. M. Taylor (Madison County); and Adjutant Harry F. Christian (Madison)

Captains, and counties from which the companies came:

Co. "A" [formerly 3rd TN Cavalry] (Wilcox and Monroe) -- W. C. Bacot (wounded, near Atlanta)
Co. "B" [previously, Co. "D", 15th TN Cavalry Battalion] (Cherokee) -- Alfred S. Truitt; Thomas W. Hampton (KIA, Mossy Creek); H. A. Gillespie
Co. "C" (Madison) -- Frank B. Gurley
Co. "D" -- William H. Taylor
Co. "E" (Jackson) -- Flavius J. Graham (wounded, near Atlanta)
Co. "F" [some of this company previously served in Co. "D", 7th AL Infantry] (Madison) -- Oliver B. Gaston (captured; died as POW)
Co. "G" (Jackson) -- Henry F. Smith (wounded)
Co. "H" [formerly 5th TN Cavalry] (Marshall) -- Henry Milner (resigned, 5 Dec 62); David Davidson (wounded; resigned)
(Madison) -- W. R. Whitman
Co. "I" [evidently consolidated from Co. "A" and "E", 15th TN Cavalry Battalion] (Marshall) -- J. William Fennell; James L. Smith; Thomas M. Patteson
Co. "K" -- David Campbell Kelley (promoted, Major, 3rd TN Cavalry); Joseph M. Hamrick (promoted, Lt. Col.); W. R. Whitman
Dunagan's Co. [Russell's Battalion, 15th TN Partisan Rangers, or Russell's Rangers; company evidently broken up when battalion was raised to a regiment, 23 Nov 62] -- Stephen R. Dunagan

User avatar
Barker
Major
Posts: 209
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2008 7:05 pm
Location: Walterboro, South Carolina

Tue Sep 02, 2008 5:59 pm

4th Alabama Cavalry [Roddy's] Regiment
The 4th Alabama Cavalry Regiment (Roddey's) was formed at Tuscumbia in October, 1862, and moved to middle Tennessee where it wintered. Recruits were from Franklin, Lauderdale, Lawrence, and Walker counties. During the early spring, 1863, the regiment was sent to the Tennessee River Valley in Northern Alabama, assigned to General Phillip Dale Roddey's Brigade where it took an active part in raiding and attacking the Federals, including meeting Union Gen'l Grenville Dodge's advance below Tuscumbia, and in helping to thwart Union Col. Abel D. Streight's Raid into Alabama. The regiment was publicly commended in April, 1863, by Gen'l Braxton Bragg for its good discipline and order. In April, 1864, the regiment was transferred to the Dept. of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana. After fighting at Brice's Cross Roads [also called Tishomingo Creek] with heavy losses, it saw action in various conflicts from Montevallo to Selma, including the defense against Union Gen'l James Wilson's Raid. At Selma, on 2 April 1865, most of the unit was captured. The remaining part surrendered at Pond Spring. The regiment's first colonel, Philip Dale Roddy, who raised an independent cavalry company before he commanded the 4th AL Cavalry, was made a brigadier early in the war. The regiment was commanded for the great part of the war by Col. William A. Johnson

Field officers: Cols. Phillip Dale Roddey (Lawrence; promoted); William Arthur Johnson (Lauderdale; wounded, Pulaski); Lt. Col. Francis Marion Windes; Majors Richard W. Johnson (Lauderdale; wounded, near Florence; KIA, near Moulton); John E. Newsom; and Adjutants Francis Marion Windes (promoted); E. S. Chisholm.

User avatar
Jabberwock
Posts: 2204
Joined: Thu May 31, 2007 12:12 am
Location: Weymouth, MA
Contact: ICQ

Tue Sep 02, 2008 6:55 pm

Barker wrote:Captains, and counties from which the companies came:

Co. "A" [formerly 3rd TN Cavalry] (Wilcox and Monroe) -- W. C. Bacot (wounded, near Atlanta)
Co. "B" [previously, Co. "D", 15th TN Cavalry Battalion] (Cherokee) -- Alfred S. Truitt; Thomas W. Hampton (KIA, Mossy Creek); H. A. Gillespie
Co. "C" (Madison) -- Frank B. Gurley
Co. "D" -- William H. Taylor
Co. "E" (Jackson) -- Flavius J. Graham (wounded, near Atlanta)
Co. "F" [some of this company previously served in Co. "D", 7th AL Infantry] (Madison) -- Oliver B. Gaston (captured; died as POW)
Co. "G" (Jackson) -- Henry F. Smith (wounded)
Co. "H" [formerly 5th TN Cavalry] (Marshall) -- Henry Milner (resigned, 5 Dec 62); David Davidson (wounded; resigned)
(Madison) -- W. R. Whitman
Co. "I" [evidently consolidated from Co. "A" and "E", 15th TN Cavalry Battalion] (Marshall) -- J. William Fennell; James L. Smith; Thomas M. Patteson
Co. "K" -- David Campbell Kelley (promoted, Major, 3rd TN Cavalry); Joseph M. Hamrick (promoted, Lt. Col.); W. R. Whitman
Dunagan's Co. [Russell's Battalion, 15th TN Partisan Rangers, or Russell's Rangers; company evidently broken up when battalion was raised to a regiment, 23 Nov 62] -- Stephen R. Dunagan


Did a little searching :sherlock: :

Co. "L" -- [formerly Company H, 1st Confederate Cavalry rgt.] (Franklin) William Houston (resigned), John E. Newsom (promoted, Major), John Calhoun Nelson
[color="DimGray"] You deserve to be spanked[/color]



Image

User avatar
Barker
Major
Posts: 209
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2008 7:05 pm
Location: Walterboro, South Carolina

Tue Sep 02, 2008 7:02 pm

Thank you I guess I did not grab that part....My GG Grandfather

Pvt Edwin V Malone 4th Alabama Cavarly, Newsome's Company - Never wounded and never a prisoner, fought entire war
Capt. Peter Barker 27th Alabama Infantry Company A - Captured at donelson, paroled and sent to Vicksburg
Pvt David Graham - 21st Alabama Infantry, Company E - Captured at Mobile, stayed duration at ship Island

User avatar
Barker
Major
Posts: 209
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2008 7:05 pm
Location: Walterboro, South Carolina

Tue Sep 02, 2008 7:04 pm

David Graham was Ed's 1st Cousin, aslo the other Malones in the 4th are all 1st cousins

User avatar
Jabberwock
Posts: 2204
Joined: Thu May 31, 2007 12:12 am
Location: Weymouth, MA
Contact: ICQ

Tue Sep 02, 2008 7:04 pm

Barker wrote:Thank you I guess I did not grab that part....


It wasn't there to grab. I had to cross-reference a few sites to figure it out.
[color="DimGray"] You deserve to be spanked[/color]



Image

User avatar
Barker
Major
Posts: 209
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2008 7:05 pm
Location: Walterboro, South Carolina

Tue Sep 02, 2008 7:06 pm

Battles in which the 27th Alabama Infantry participated



Fort Henry, February 6, 1862
Fort Donelson, February 12 - 16, 1862
Vicksburg Campaign, May - July, 1863
Baker's Creek, May 16, 1863
Jackson Siege, July, 1863
Meridian Campaign, February - March, 1864
Morton, February 8, 1863
Chunky Mountain, February 12, 1864
Moulton, March 21, 1864
Florence, April 12, 1864
Atlanta Campaign, May - September, 1864
Resaca, May 14 - 15, 1864
New Hope Church, May 25 - June 4, 1864
Kennesaw Mountain, June 27, 1864
Peach Tree Creek, July 20, 1864
Ezra Church, July 28, 1864
Atlanta Siege, July - September, 1864
Jonesboro, August 31 - September 1, 1864
Ackworth, October 4, 1864
Franklin, November 30, 1864
Nashville, December 15 - 16, 1864
Carolinas Campaign, February - April, 1865
Kinston, March 7 - 10, 1865
Bentonville, March 19 - 21, 1865

User avatar
Daxil
AGEod Grognard
Posts: 849
Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2008 7:55 pm
Location: Somewhere in the Alleghenies

Wed Sep 03, 2008 3:33 pm

Barker wrote:My GG Grandfather served with Forrest. 4th Alabama Cav. From what my Grandfather said he had nothing but praise for him....he was bent on victory and to show them what for if they come to us...that was an actual quote. Forrest was a great General in Cav Raider Tactics, Ambush overall disruption of supplies. He was an innovative tactician when he persued the Union Cav through Moulton and whipped them good. There was many atrocities of that during the war on both sides but it was more at a company to regiment level and basically not division wide I think. I could be wrong.


He was an excellent tactical general, but unfortunately pinned down in Mississippi during the critical battle for Atlanta.
"We shall give them the bayonet." -Stonewall at Fredericksburg.

User avatar
Barker
Major
Posts: 209
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2008 7:05 pm
Location: Walterboro, South Carolina

Wed Sep 03, 2008 3:57 pm

What really won him favor was the withdrawl from donelson and how he defend the and attacked the right......he won the skirmish but was told to move back to the trenches...that was a tactical error on pillows part

User avatar
Ol' Choctaw
Posts: 1642
Joined: Sat Feb 19, 2011 7:13 pm

Sun Feb 27, 2011 12:36 pm

Back to the stats on Forrest.

I know it has already been changed and not likely to be changed again but just for the sake of discussion, do you think that Patriot was strong enough?

We know he could recruit on the move but did you know that he was said to be the richest man in the South?

When he enlisted as a private in the Tennessee Mounted Rifles he saw the state of supply and offered to buy the horses and equipment for the regiment.

Did you know that he raised his first command on his own dime? He bought all their equipment horses, uniforms, arms, and all.

He didn't stop there either. He kept them supplied and when he was defeated at Nashville he went back and recruited and equipped his new force, again with his own money.

As to the Hot Head discussion; I think any competent commander might have done the same in his situation. To me it is Bragg who could always bring out the worst in his commanders to promote their anger.

As you can see he received a separate command and was not chastised for his actions. In fact he was promoted! And not for the last time.

As for being a partisan I can only say that his first battalion was a Ranger Battalion and his accomplishment of bringing his supplies and war materials from Louisville to Memphis do show that ability as well. In stealth and cunning if not in the actions of other raiders.

User avatar
Pat "Stonewall" Cleburne
General of the Army
Posts: 639
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 7:46 pm
Location: Kentucky

Sun Mar 06, 2011 8:28 am

Ol' Choctaw wrote:Back to the stats on Forrest.

I know it has already been changed and not likely to be changed again but just for the sake of discussion, do you think that Patriot was strong enough?

We know he could recruit on the move but did you know that he was said to be the richest man in the South?

When he enlisted as a private in the Tennessee Mounted Rifles he saw the state of supply and offered to buy the horses and equipment for the regiment.

Did you know that he raised his first command on his own dime? He bought all their equipment horses, uniforms, arms, and all.

He didn't stop there either. He kept them supplied and when he was defeated at Nashville he went back and recruited and equipped his new force, again with his own money.

As to the Hot Head discussion; I think any competent commander might have done the same in his situation. To me it is Bragg who could always bring out the worst in his commanders to promote their anger.

As you can see he received a separate command and was not chastised for his actions. In fact he was promoted! And not for the last time.

As for being a partisan I can only say that his first battalion was a Ranger Battalion and his accomplishment of bringing his supplies and war materials from Louisville to Memphis do show that ability as well. In stealth and cunning if not in the actions of other raiders.


Interesting stuff. I'll say if there's one general that needs the quickly angered trait that doesn't have it, it's Bragg. It's not that he blew up all the time, It's that he made all of his subordinates hate him in remarkably short amounts of time.

User avatar
Ol' Choctaw
Posts: 1642
Joined: Sat Feb 19, 2011 7:13 pm

Tue Feb 19, 2013 10:16 am

Reading back through the thread, HE WAS GIVEN THE TRAIT SPECULITIVELY!!!

It was not about his argument with Bragg.

runyan99 wrote:I like adding Quick Angered to Forrest as a corps commander. He probably would have got on poorly with subordinates.
:blink:

Which means that he should never have been given that.

With almost any commander you can find a flaw or a downside. Thus far, I have not found that with this man. And for me, that says a lot.

User avatar
DrPostman
Posts: 2949
Joined: Wed Nov 09, 2011 5:39 pm
Location: Memphis, TN
Contact: Website Facebook Twitter YouTube

Mon Apr 29, 2013 5:05 pm

I live in Memphis and it's been painful to watch all the crap about the park named after him here. So much false information about
the man you'd have thought he was the most evil person of the Civil War. He's even been compared to Nazis. Looks like the new
name will be Health Sciences Park due to the UT school of medicine that nearly surrounds it. At least the Klan protest was a fizzle.
There were more cops than Klan at their "rally" and a counter rally celebrating diversity was held across town that got a lot of
support. I haven't heard what they plan to do with the statue or the bodies of himself and his wife there.

Did you guys know that his great-grandson was the first general to die in combat during WW2? He stayed at the controls of his
B-17 giving the crew a chance to bail out before the aircraft exploded and killed him.
"Ludus non nisi sanguineus"

Image

User avatar
Ol' Choctaw
Posts: 1642
Joined: Sat Feb 19, 2011 7:13 pm

Sat May 04, 2013 4:16 pm

I was borne in Memphis and lived near by until I finished high school. Forrest was beloved of the black community until around the time of MLK’s death. Of course that was the 60s and the young knew everything and the older generations were just ignorant fools.
There was a celebration every year on the day of his burial put on by the black community, who honored Forrest for his work in civil rights and to bring blacks equality.
They knew full well that he had headed the Clan, with a C, after the war but also knew that that was a very different organization than what was revived later.

Current controversy and hatred of the man is borne of ignorance. Later generations have forgotten or never bother to find out what their grand parents and great grand parents were quite familiar with.

User avatar
Hobbes
Posts: 4366
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 12:18 am
Location: UK

Sat May 04, 2013 9:29 pm

Ol' Choctaw wrote:I was borne in Memphis and lived near by until I finished high school. Forrest was beloved of the black community until around the time of MLK’s death. Of course that was the 60s and the young knew everything and the older generations were just ignorant fools.
There was a celebration every year on the day of his burial put on by the black community, who honored Forrest for his work in civil rights and to bring blacks equality.
They knew full well that he had headed the Clan, with a C, after the war but also knew that that was a very different organization than what was revived later.

Current controversy and hatred of the man is borne of ignorance. Later generations have forgotten or never bother to find out what their grand parents and great grand parents were quite familiar with.


Very intersting post Ol. I read a book about Forrest but had no idea about this.

User avatar
1stvermont
Major
Posts: 223
Joined: Wed May 13, 2015 1:20 am
Location: Vermont USA

Wed Jun 10, 2015 6:13 pm

I just finished reading the book The Campaigns Of General Nathan Bedford Forrest And Of Forrest's Cavalry
http://www.amazon.com/Campaigns-General-Bedford-Forrest-Forrests/dp/030680719X

what a amazing general. The book contains all the info on his military operations throughout the whole war. It goes some into his early life but of the 700 or so pages it is 95% military actions. It was written [ this is updated version reprint] in 1868 using battle action reports from both confederate and federal officers as well as interviewing soldiers and generals on both sides and entirely checked and supported by Forrest himself who provided his reports and constant fact checking. Some of the more interesting finds and quotes in book I found stood out.


-He had no schooling or military training
-He enlisted as 40 year old private, by end of war he was a lieutenant general
“ Historians consider him to be one of the greatest Calvary commanders of all time”
-A superhuman warrior personally killed 30 men in battle --No high ranking general killed as many men in combat since medieval period
-He was attacked by 4 men in Calvary fight while mounted he shot one but received wounds to head and arm 3 more federals come into fight shooting and stabbing at him he uses his pistol to block attacks but his hammer is hacked away on pistol so cannot fire, his horse gets shot and wounded. His escape is blocked on all sides by thick woods on sides and federal troops forward and a wagon across road in retreat, he jumps over wagon with horse to retreat, 30 paces down road attacked again by saber blocks with new pistol and shoots and kills attacker.-
-Multiple times captured numbers larger than his own command and had to let prisoners go because he did not have enough men to control them.
-At shiloh his 15 year old son and 2 other soldiers his age captured 15 federals
-Survived wounds that would kill most
-Used captured infantry drums to make his Calvary appear more numerous to enemy. [Thinking infantry was in area.]
- Always ready to charge his escort [elite soldiers around 70 men] in middle of fight to turn tide of battle or stave off disaster.
-Kept enemy uncertain of his moments
-Used some of his older men to act as local citizens and give false info to upcoming federals on the whereabouts of Forrest .
--when federals tried to trap him, he would be able to get across bridges/streams thought unpassabel
- A case of federal Calvary not attacking when they found out Calvary was under Forrest command [ though they had larger force]
-Often would do the mission when no volunteer would in his command [ cross frozen rivers, dangerous scouting missions etc]
-A captured Forrest solider convinced the federal general of a confederate force that was not there and caused federals force to retreat [though larger than Forrest]
-Often blocked retreat of larger enemy force with much needed men even when outnumbered 3 or 4 to 1.
-Had many horses shot from under him[ guess of 20] -one charge received 5 bullet holes to saddle.-another he was scouting ground wanted good info got so close had 2 horse shot under him before he felt had enough info.
-when viewing his lines made his 4,500 look like over 10,000 to union commander during surrender negotiations.
-Had artillery brought up road in circles to appear like he had more than he did during surrender negotiations
-He had scouts wear captured federal uniforms to gather info and captured 50 soldiers [ who thought them federals soldiers]
--Forrest outran retreating federals following a rout found himself surrounded by 100 federals and was shot multiple times, his horse mortally wounded- he used a revolver cleared path and escaped from a hail of bullets.
-Often had to release most of his prisoners as he had to many to control and bring with him.--Once had prisoners help move artillery wagons through rough roads to than be set free.
---Many soldiers deserted from Joe Johnston army wanting to instead fight for Forrest
- A negro helped confederate Calvary with info on federal Calvary that led to capture of federal Calvary.
-A union officer saved his life by yelling his name telling him to get back out of harms way of union ambush [former captive of Forrest's who was released]
- Did lose a few battles but never a fair fight and always because outnumber 3-4 to 1 and directions not followed or intercepted courier.
-Not the founder of the KKK
-In march 1845 was attacked by 4 citizens was shot, but severely wounded all and drove them off [later the 4 were arrested]
-Treated slaves well and always bought whole families
-6'2 broad shoulders full chest muscular limbs
- Was a sates rights democrat, did not want union to dissolve so long as states had rights
-Friend who knew him from before war said he looked unrecognizable in battle [ face eyes expressions looked like war Indian they said]
-Caring of his men
-Great at scouting/ambushing
-Some say part of his success was luck, I thought so at first but when it kept happening I found it to be his amazing timing of troops sent and arriving at correct time.
-The only real downfall would be that perhaps he trusted militia to much.



Battle results

some of his main tactics in battle were

“Get their first with the most”
Active defensive
Sudden assaults on isolated positions
Scout and have good info of enemy
Kept enemy uncertain of his movements
Swift heavy blows
Calvary charge


-In one battle charged a force 2x size up hill with artillery, he captured the guns took 75 prisoners caused 50 causalities retook 60 captured confederates and supplies. After battle was done He had 15 bullet holes in cloths and his horse fell dead after battle with 7 bullet wounds.[ later that day would have horse hit with solid shot from cannon die under him]
-Attack a depot with 300 untried troops, results were 400 prisoners 1,000 horses 15 wagons 600,000 rounds ammo 100,000 rations cloths etc $500,000 worth overall.
-with 1/3 the enemy force battle of tishomingo creek enemy force 3,300 Calvary and 5,400 infantry - Forrest had only 3,200 men he drove federal force 58 miles captured 19 guns 200 wagons 30 ambulances ammunition other materials 2,000 prisoners 1,900 killed complete destruction/disorganization of force [ only about 1,000 men from union made it back by foot]confederates fatigued from long travel before battle losses low as 140 killed 500 wounded.
-One raid with 1,800 in command they captured 150 federals, killed 25, wounded another 50, captured 200 horses, a few wagons and 2 artillery, tore up railroad and captured rail cars.. He rearmed his entire force [ brigade] with better captured weapons than when they went into raid . Lost 3 killed 5 wounded.
-A raid in Tennessee caused 3,500 federal casualties 8 artillery captured 400 horses and mules 100 wagons 100 cattle 3,000 arms stores destroyed rail 6 bridges 2 locomotives 50 fright cars captured/destroyed 50 block houses gained 1,000 men [ recruited from area deserters from Joe Johnson army looking for Forrest] at a loss of 300, returned stronger than left.
-On a raid in West Tennessee a federal newspaper wrote “Forrest with less than 4,000 men has moved right through the 96th army corps has passed within 9 miles of Memphis carried off 100 wagons, 100 beef cattle 3,000 conscripts [ men who joined his ranks from population/stranglers etc] innumerable stores, tore up railroad track, cut telephone wire, burned and sacked towns ran over picket lines, with a single derringer pistol and all in the face of 10,000 men [ 7,500 more sent from Kentucky].-Known for his deep raids in enemy territory
-He would charge fast at slight chance to cause panic – one example 150 confederates charged 350 federals while crossing river caused rout and captured 70 soldiers
-In a month long campaign destroyed rail, 2,500 federals killed or prisoners and came back stronger and better equpied than he left.
-Attacked with 1,800 men- captured 2,200 not including killed wounded and lost only 30 men 150 wounded.
-Another battle the Federal losses were 500 prisoners 10 killed [ 230 soon after]16 wagons 3 ambulances Forrest lost only 1 killed 2 wounded
-In one action he burned 4 bridges captured 145 federals plus 15-20 killed without a single man killed or wounded in.
-During 4-5 small skirmishes lost 200 men, but killed 350 captured 2,000 prisoners and captured artillery and wagon
-Union set a ambush, but Forrest charged faster than they thought captured 30 killed/wounded 20 lost only 2 killed
-Charged a lined enemy Calvary with superior force and only lost 1 killed and killed 20 and took 50 prisoners.



Great quotes from book

“wait a moment major, I 'll bring one from the Yankees yonder” returning little while later “ here's the horse I promised you, major, and a Yankee to boot” [ captured federal officer as well]
Private argyle powell to major Phil Allin upon losing his horse before a charge



In pursuit of routed federals confederate officer yells “Get out of our country, you worthless rascals”
Federal turns his head and says “Faith and by Jasus an't it that same we're trying to do just as fast as we can”





"His cavalry, which Sherman reported in disgust “could travel one hundred miles in less time than it takes our to travel ten,”
"How do you like this are coming back into the union"
Confederate solider to Pennsylvanian citizen before Gettysburg

"No way sherman will go to hell, he would outflank the devil and get past havens guard"
Southern solider about northern General Sherman

"Angels went to receive his body from his grave but he was not there, they left very disappointed but upon return to haven, found he had outflanked them and was already there".
Northern newspaper about the death of Stonewall Jackson

Return to “Officers room”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest