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What exactly does determine minor or major victory?

Posted: Sat Apr 01, 2017 6:39 am
by Generaloberst
So I have been playing as Rome in the Third Servile War scenario. I have utterly crushed the slaves, killed Spartacus and took all their territory back. There wasn't even a "Slaves" faction listed in the objective screen anymore. Only objective city I didn't control was the one in Sicily and that was because the region was locked. But in the end l got a minor victory, why? I have gone through the manual again but to no avail. I have been only able to get minors in this game, how am I supposed to get a major victory?

Re: What exactly does determine minor or major victory?

Posted: Mon Apr 03, 2017 3:35 am
by Durk
AGEOD victory are different from other games. Most other games only use territorial objectives or territorial objectives minus battle casualties. These are fine, but often understate actual victory.
Before providing my understanding, let me say, in these games if you break even or win a minor victory you should be very happy.

Additional factors seem to be:
Time it takes to achieve your goal – the victory cities. Incidently, there are very few victory cities you cannot take if you take the best couse of play or the optimum options. So if there is a locked one, there might be an option you are missing.
Your losses
Your opponent's losses
Your NM versus your opponent's NM.

The system is a real challenge, but enjoy the success you gain.

Re: What exactly does determine minor or major victory?

Posted: Mon Apr 03, 2017 9:01 am
by arsan
I think the Major victory in AJE is only awarded if you force the enemy to surrender before the end of the scenario because of a national Morale automatic victory.
That's getting the enemy down to 25 or less NM o getting yourself up to more than 175 NM.

I guess in some scenarios this may be impossible because of the scenario design and setup.
So I wouldn't worry much about what the end message says.

Regards

Re: What exactly does determine minor or major victory?

Posted: Tue Apr 04, 2017 10:56 am
by Generaloberst
Thanks for the answers! Makes a lot of sense. :)