Sruba
Private
Posts: 39
Joined: Sun Nov 22, 2015 11:48 pm

More Roman Civil War scenarios.

Sat Jan 23, 2016 6:29 pm

I'm curious, if AEGOD considered at any point making scenarios for Roman Civil War, after Pharsalos battle ?
Alexandria, African and Spain wars could be really interesting, with Republic struggle to fight back Ceasar once again, and then two more scenarios of Brutus and Cassius vs Octavian and Anthony with the last struggle of the giants Anthony vs Octavian. Is there any chance that AJE campagin DLC will be resumed ?

cwegsche
Lieutenant
Posts: 142
Joined: Mon Dec 28, 2009 11:54 am

Mon Feb 01, 2016 11:50 am

Unfortunately I don't think so, which is quite a shame as the engine suits much better for the AJE-titles than all the new releases of AGEOD ... hmm really sad.

Temgesic
Lieutenant
Posts: 107
Joined: Sat Dec 26, 2015 6:19 am

Fri Feb 05, 2016 8:27 am

cwegsche wrote:Unfortunately I don't think so, which is quite a shame as the engine suits much better for the AJE-titles than all the new releases of AGEOD ... hmm really sad.


I think the roman/ancient times unfortunaley is behind us now. AJE/BOR/HAN is one of the best games AGEOD has ever produced, especially after the latest patching.
But im afraid that the new AGE won´t go back to the roman timeframe.

User avatar
Durk
Posts: 2726
Joined: Thu Apr 28, 2011 4:36 am
Location: Wyoming

Sun Feb 07, 2016 5:00 am

My take, hang in there. AGOED has supported AJE modules so well. Even this week a new update.
This excellent game will continue to have support, my view.

Sruba
Private
Posts: 39
Joined: Sun Nov 22, 2015 11:48 pm

Wed Feb 10, 2016 5:50 pm

Well, my question was not about support, but about making more scenarios for Roman War timeframe or Gallic Wars or even late empire era.

Are there any new scenario mods ?

Temgesic
Lieutenant
Posts: 107
Joined: Sat Dec 26, 2015 6:19 am

Tue Feb 16, 2016 7:38 am

Durk wrote:My take, hang in there. AGOED has supported AJE modules so well. Even this week a new update.
This excellent game will continue to have support, my view.


I really hope so, it would be a shame if this falls in the shadows.

Think AJE on the new WON engine, with the new graphics and everything. Would be a dream come true :D

cwegsche
Lieutenant
Posts: 142
Joined: Mon Dec 28, 2009 11:54 am

Tue Feb 16, 2016 8:09 am

Temgesic wrote:I really hope so, it would be a shame if this falls in the shadows.

Think AJE on the new WON engine, with the new graphics and everything. Would be a dream come true :D


I have to say I would like AJE to keep exactly the same engine it has right now ... I like the old graphics much more and all the new releases I have seen from the new engine ... well ... not really impressing to say at least ...

Altaris
Posts: 1543
Joined: Wed Dec 07, 2011 8:20 pm

Tue Feb 16, 2016 2:30 pm

I was always really surprised there was no Octavian/Augustus Caesar Civil War... this one was just as interesting as Julius Caesar vs Pompey.

User avatar
Durk
Posts: 2726
Joined: Thu Apr 28, 2011 4:36 am
Location: Wyoming

Wed Feb 17, 2016 7:18 am

I do agree that the Octavian Augustus conflict would be nice to play, which reminded me of these other potential scenarios.
44-43 BC between the Senate's army Cicero and then by Octavius and the army of Antony, Lepidus, and their colleagues
44–42 BC the Second Triumvirate and the Liberators (Brutus and Cassius, Caesar's assassins
44–36 BC between the Second Triumvirate (particularly Octavius and Agrippa) and Sextus Pompey, the son of Pompey
Perusine War 41–40 BC, between the forces of Octavius against Lucius Antonius and Fulvia
Final War of the Roman Republic (32–30 BC), between Octavius and his friend and general Agrippa against Mark Antony and Cleopatra
Each could be a stand alone or all could be a new scenario

cwegsche
Lieutenant
Posts: 142
Joined: Mon Dec 28, 2009 11:54 am

Wed Feb 17, 2016 7:50 am

Durk wrote:I do agree that the Octavian Augustus conflict would be nice to play, which reminded me of these other potential scenarios.
44-43 BC between the Senate's army Cicero and then by Octavius and the army of Antony, Lepidus, and their colleagues
44–42 BC the Second Triumvirate and the Liberators (Brutus and Cassius, Caesar's assassins
44–36 BC between the Second Triumvirate (particularly Octavius and Agrippa) and Sextus Pompey, the son of Pompey
Perusine War 41–40 BC, between the forces of Octavius against Lucius Antonius and Fulvia
Final War of the Roman Republic (32–30 BC), between Octavius and his friend and general Agrippa against Mark Antony and Cleopatra
Each could be a stand alone or all could be a new scenario


Yes Durk these are the scenarios more or less I wrote about since a long time which I think was the most interesting time in the ancient rome but unfortunately the whole thing stopped for other releases and I don't think we will see any of those ... of course AJE will be SUPPORTED in the future but I don't think new scenarios will come :-(((

PJJ
Captain
Posts: 197
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2007 8:52 am

Wed Feb 17, 2016 2:59 pm

In my humble opinion, it's a great pity that Ageod doesn't seem to have any new plans for ancient warfare. I think AJE is easily the most polished and enjoyable of their games, thanks to active post-release support which has continued until now.

hanny1
Captain
Posts: 159
Joined: Sat Jan 02, 2016 11:57 am

Wed Feb 17, 2016 3:07 pm

On my *wish* list would be to link the PW1 to PW2 including all scns in between, the only one missing would be the Punic expansion into Spain, so as to have a rise and fall of Rome/Carthage and to be played as either, ending in the domination of one over the other.

PJJ
Captain
Posts: 197
Joined: Wed Sep 05, 2007 8:52 am

Wed Feb 17, 2016 3:14 pm

hanny1 wrote:On my *wish* list would be to link the PW1 to PW2 including all scns in between, the only one missing would be the Punic expansion into Spain, so as to have a rise and fall of Rome/Carthage and to be played as either, ending in the domination of one over the other.


The Barcid campaigns in Iberia would be very interesting, but I imagine a lack of historical sources could be a problem for creating such a scenario. The Romans did too thorough a job at wiping out Carthage and her archives!

Sruba
Private
Posts: 39
Joined: Sun Nov 22, 2015 11:48 pm

Thu Feb 18, 2016 6:38 pm

I do agree that the Octavian Augustus conflict would be nice to play, which reminded me of these other potential scenarios.
44-43 BC between the Senate's army Cicero and then by Octavius and the army of Antony, Lepidus, and their colleagues
44–42 BC the Second Triumvirate and the Liberators (Brutus and Cassius, Caesar's assassins
44–36 BC between the Second Triumvirate (particularly Octavius and Agrippa) and Sextus Pompey, the son of Pompey
Perusine War 41–40 BC, between the forces of Octavius against Lucius Antonius and Fulvia
Final War of the Roman Republic (32–30 BC), between Octavius and his friend and general Agrippa against Mark Antony and Cleopatra
Each could be a stand alone or all could be a new scenario


Indeed, that's a dream expansion for AJE. I can't believe that AGEOD didn't think of it to make exapnsion with that timeline into AJE (maybe more of business decision).

Maybe if there would be a crowdfunding action for such expansion AGEOD (kickstarter or AGEOD website), they would put an eye for ancient playerbase and make an expansion which would put AJE into second youth !

CatoTheYounger
Sergeant
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Jul 17, 2015 10:26 am

Fri Feb 19, 2016 8:33 am

I would LOVE a campaign with ancient Greece. The Peloponnesian War would be an amazing grand campaign. Ambitious but worth it no doubt.

Canon
Lieutenant
Posts: 106
Joined: Wed Feb 06, 2013 10:58 pm

Fri Feb 19, 2016 8:36 pm

A while back I remember seeing some post about how Hannibal sales were lower than expected, so the odds of getting a new expansion for this series is quite low. AGEOD is just a small company, and they have to go where the money is. Things may have changed since, but I wouldn't hold my breath...

Even farther back I remember seeing some screenshots of a new scenario (mod) that someone was working on, and that scenario looked very promising! Mind you, this was years ago, and it's possible this has been scrapped as well.

But I think modding is the avenue that will have to be taken if we are to see more scenarios for this series. Which isn't exactly an issue, but from my limited knowledge of modding, AGEOD in general seems a little more difficult to mod than some other game series. Also, AGEOD is more niche, and as such doesn't possess the large community of more mainstream games that bring in a wider array of talent to the fold.

If AGEOD would release a Mod Pack of tools to make scenario creation and editing easier, perhaps we could see many of the scenarios on our wishlist come to life. There remains so much potential for this series, as scenarios covering Caesar in Gaul, Roman conquests of Britain, the Civil Wars mentioned above, and late Roman Empire scenarios remain untouched.

So while the AJE series is most definitely a rare gem, it could become even so much more enticing to play. But that would have to come from the community in my opinion.

hanny1
Captain
Posts: 159
Joined: Sat Jan 02, 2016 11:57 am

Sun Feb 21, 2016 12:52 pm

PJJ wrote:The Barcid campaigns in Iberia would be very interesting, but I imagine a lack of historical sources could be a problem for creating such a scenario. The Romans did too thorough a job at wiping out Carthage and her archives!
Not really a problem, we know where/ when the Punics took control, we know roughly with how many they achieved it.

User avatar
Belisarius7
Conscript
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 12:09 am
Location: GA

Sat Jul 23, 2016 2:02 am

Caesar in Gaul scenarios would be most appreciated.

User avatar
Philippe
AGEod Veteran
Posts: 754
Joined: Thu Oct 26, 2006 11:00 pm
Location: New York

Sat Jul 23, 2016 5:04 pm

Excerpt from Wikipedia on the Macedonian Wars:

quote

Second Macedonian war (200 to 196 BC)

The past century had seen the Greek world dominated by the three primary successor kingdoms of Alexander the Great's empire: Ptolemaic Egypt, Macedonia and the Seleucid Empire. The imperial ambitions of the Seleucids after 230 BC were particularly destabilizing. The Seleucids set out to conquer Egypt, and Egypt responded through a major mobilization campaign. This campaign led to military victory against Seleucid incursions, but in 205 BC when Ptolemy IV was succeeded by the five-year-old Ptolemy V (or rather, by his regents), the newly armed Egyptians turned against each other. The result was a major civil war between north and south. Seeing that all of Egypt could now be conquered easily, the Macedonians and Seleucids forged an alliance to conquer and divide Egypt between themselves.[14]

This represented the most significant threat to the century-old political order that had kept the Greek world in relative stability, and in particular represented a major threat to the smaller Greek kingdoms which had remained independent. As Macedonia and the Seleucid Empire were the problem, and Egypt the cause of the problem, the only place to turn was Rome. This represented a major change, as the Greeks had recently shown little more than contempt towards Rome, and Rome little more than apathy towards Greece. Ambassadors from Pergamon and Rhodes brought evidence before the Roman Senate that Philip V of Macedon and Antiochus III of the Seleucid Empire had signed the non-aggression pact. Although the exact nature of this treaty is unclear, and the exact Roman reason for getting involved despite decades of apathy towards Greece (the relevant passages on this from our primary source, Polybius, have been lost), the Greek delegation was successful.[15] Initially, Rome didn't intend to fight a war against Macedon, but rather to intervene on their behalf diplomatically.[15]

Rome gave Philip an ultimatum that he must cease in his campaigns against Rome's new Greek allies. Doubting Rome's strength (not an unfounded belief given Rome's performance in the First Macedonian War) Philip ignored the request, which surprised the Romans. Believing their honor and reputation on the line, Rome escalated the conflict by sending an army of Romans and Greek allies to force the issue, beginning the Second Macedonian War.[16] Surprisingly (given his recent successes against the Greeks and earlier successes against Rome), Philip's army buckled under the pressure from the Roman-Greek army. Roman troops led by then consul Titus Quinctius Flamininus reached the plain of Thessaly by 198 BC.[17] In 197 BC the Romans decisively defeated Philip at the Battle of Cynoscephalae, and he sued for peace.[18] In the resulting Treaty of Tempea, Philip V was forbidden from interfering with affairs outside his borders, and was required to relinquish his recent Greek conquests. At the Olympiad in 196 BC Rome proclaimed the "Freedom of the Greeks", which constituted Rome's (arguably misguided) new policy towards Greece. This was that Greece was now stable and Rome could completely remove itself from Greek affairs without risking more instability.[19] It seemed that Rome had no further interest in the region, as they withdrew all military forces without even attempting to consolidate any gains, and subsequently returned to their prior apathy even when their Greek allies ignored later Roman requests.[19]




Seleucid War (192 to 188 BC)

With Egypt and Macedonia now weakened, the Seleucid Empire became increasingly aggressive and successful in its attempts to conquer the entire Greek world.[20] When Rome pulled out of Greece at the end of the Second Macedonian War, they (and their allies) thought they had left behind a stable peace. However, by weakening the last remaining check on Seleucid expansion, they left behind the opposite. Now not only did Rome's allies against Philip seek a Roman alliance against the Seleucids, but Philip himself even sought an alliance with Rome.[21] The situation was made worse by the fact that Hannibal was now a chief military advisor to the Seleucid emperor, and the two were believed to be planning for an outright conquest not just of Greece, but of Rome also.[22] The Seleucids were much stronger than the Macedonians had ever been, given that they controlled much of the former Persian Empire, and by this point had almost entirely reassembled Alexander the Great's former empire.[22] Fearing the worst, the Romans began a major mobilization, all but pulling out of recently pacified Spain and Gaul.[22] They even established a major garrison in Sicily in case the Seleucids ever got to Italy.[22] This fear was shared by Rome's Greek allies, who had largely ignored Rome in the years after the Second Macedonian War, but now followed Rome again for the first time since that war.[22] A major Roman-Greek force was mobilized under the command of the great hero of the Second Punic War, Scipio Africanus, and set out for Greece, beginning the Roman-Syrian War. After initial fighting that revealed serious Seleucid weaknesses, the Seleucids tried to turn the Roman strength against them at the Battle of Thermopylae (as they believed the 300 Spartans had done centuries earlier to the mighty Persian Empire).[21] Like the Spartans, the Seleucids lost the battle, and were forced to evacuate Greece.[21] The Romans pursued the Seleucids by crossing the Hellespont, which marked the first time a Roman army had ever entered Asia.[21] The decisive engagement was fought at the Battle of Magnesia, resulting in a complete Roman victory.[21][23] The Seleucids sued for peace, and Rome forced them to give up their recent Greek conquests. Though they still controlled a great deal of territory, this defeat marked the beginning of the end of their empire, as they were to begin facing increasingly aggressive subjects in the east (the Parthians) and the west (the Greeks), as well as Judea in the South. Their empire disintegrated into a rump over the course of the next century, when it was eclipsed by Pontus. Following Magnesia, Rome pulled out of Greece again, assuming (or hoping) that the lack of a major Greek power would ensure a stable peace, though it did the opposite.[24]

unquote

These two campaigns were show-cased in an old SPI board-game (The Conquerors). The Seleucid war is a lot of fun because it has cameo appearences by some of your favorite characters from the 2nd Punic War.

The 3rd Punic War would round out the saga and make a good introductory scenario (as would the Third Macedonia War).

Return to “Alea Jacta Est”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests