User avatar
Scaramouche
Private
Posts: 23
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2012 6:06 am
Location: Rennes (France)

Sat Apr 07, 2012 8:36 pm

lodilefty wrote:We'll change these to Coureurs de bois for next update.


Thanks ! That's the way we call them in French. Even if they might have been called differently during the 17th and 18th centuries in New-France.

User avatar
Scaramouche
Private
Posts: 23
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2012 6:06 am
Location: Rennes (France)

Sun Apr 08, 2012 3:12 pm

Scaramouche wrote:Thanks ! That's the way we call them in French. Even if they might have been called differently during the 17th and 18th centuries in New-France.


Sorry for this too quick reply - after reading this very interesting thread. I have to correct what I wrote. Well, "coureurs de bois" and "coureurs des bois" might mean exactly the same thing in French. Sometimes, "de" is used instead of "des" but the word that follows remains in the plural. Especially after this word that keeps our minds occupied : "coureur". For instance, "coureur de femmes" ou "coureur de jupons" that means, a man who likes flirting with women... and more. Concerning "coureur de(s) bois", we might find a very subtle difference : "coureur de bois" can be understood like a man who travels over woods and forests (let's say the wilderness) and "coureur des bois" like a man that lives in the woods, that is from the woods - like Robin des bois, as we call your Robin Hood. So, since these two definitions are accurate for these "coureurs de(s) bois", that were part of the French forces during the Fench & Indian War, "coureurs des bois" and "coureurs de bois" sound good to me. The fact is that "coureurs des bois" is more often heard and red in France. So here is the correction I talked about at the beginning : "coureurs des bois" sounds better to me - even if "coureurs de bois" seems correct to me too.

Sinon, Fenris, - ouf, je reviens au français ! - moi aussi, je me demande bien comment utiliser les navires corsaires !

User avatar
FENRIS
AGEod Guard of Honor
Posts: 1463
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2012 11:02 am
Location: Marseille (France)

Sun Apr 08, 2012 6:28 pm

Scaramouche wrote:Sorry for this too quick reply - after reading this very interesting thread. I have to correct what I wrote. Well, "coureurs de bois" and "coureurs des bois" might mean exactly the same thing in French. Sometimes, "de" is used instead of "des" but the word that follows remains in the plural. Especially after this word that keeps our minds occupied : "coureur". For instance, "coureur de femmes" ou "coureur de jupons" that means, a man who likes flirting with women... and more. Concerning "coureur de(s) bois", we might find a very subtle difference : "coureur de bois" can be understood like a man who travels over woods and forests (let's say the wilderness) and "coureur des bois" like a man that lives in the woods, that is from the woods - like Robin des bois, as we call your Robin Hood. So, since these two definitions are accurate for these "coureurs de(s) bois", that were part of the French forces during the Fench & Indian War, "coureurs des bois" and "coureurs de bois" sound good to me. The fact is that "coureurs des bois" is more often heard and red in France. So here is the correction I talked about at the beginning : "coureurs des bois" sounds better to me - even if "coureurs de bois" seems correct to me too.

Sinon, Fenris, - ouf, je reviens au français ! - moi aussi, je me demande bien comment utiliser les navires corsaires !


j'aimerais bien avoir une reponse vu le coût de l'option 'lettre de marque' :confused:

User avatar
Hobbes
Posts: 4366
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 12:18 am
Location: UK

Sun Apr 08, 2012 6:52 pm

Scaramouche wrote:Sorry for this too quick reply - after reading this very interesting thread. I have to correct what I wrote. Well, "coureurs de bois" and "coureurs des bois" might mean exactly the same thing in French. Sometimes, "de" is used instead of "des" but the word that follows remains in the plural. Especially after this word that keeps our minds occupied : "coureur". For instance, "coureur de femmes" ou "coureur de jupons" that means, a man who likes flirting with women... and more. Concerning "coureur de(s) bois", we might find a very subtle difference : "coureur de bois" can be understood like a man who travels over woods and forests (let's say the wilderness) and "coureur des bois" like a man that lives in the woods, that is from the woods - like Robin des bois, as we call your Robin Hood. So, since these two definitions are accurate for these "coureurs de(s) bois", that were part of the French forces during the Fench & Indian War, "coureurs des bois" and "coureurs de bois" sound good to me. The fact is that "coureurs des bois" is more often heard and red in France. So here is the correction I talked about at the beginning : "coureurs des bois" sounds better to me - even if "coureurs de bois" seems correct to me too.

Sinon, Fenris, - ouf, je reviens au français ! - moi aussi, je me demande bien comment utiliser les navires corsaires !


If you look on the web for as long as I did to find the correct phrase you will find several other non AGEOD forum threads that have a similar discussion. But none have what seems like a fairly definitive answer like this. So thank you Scara for your post - especially as it sounds like Coureurs des bois may be the most correct :)

Thanks, Chris

User avatar
ERISS
AGEod Guard of Honor
Posts: 1989
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 2010 10:25 am
Location: France

Sun Apr 08, 2012 10:54 pm

Sans aller jusqu'à parler le vieux françois, je pense qu'il faut utiliser le nom de l'époque (vous qui comptez les boutons des uniformes d'époque..).
"Coureur des bois" me semble une forme moderne parlée, mais "Coureur de bois" me semble la forme moderne littéraire/académique qui a probablement été conservée de l'ancienne forme.

User avatar
FENRIS
AGEod Guard of Honor
Posts: 1463
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2012 11:02 am
Location: Marseille (France)

Sun Apr 08, 2012 11:59 pm

:mdr: Et dire que c'est parti d'une simple observation... On va devenir des spécialistes en linguistique :w00t:

User avatar
Scaramouche
Private
Posts: 23
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2012 6:06 am
Location: Rennes (France)

Mon Apr 09, 2012 1:44 pm

Hobbes wrote: So thank you Scara for your post - especially as it sounds like Coureurs des bois may be the most correct :)
Thanks, Chris

You're welcome ! But I really think that "coureurs de bois" is as correct as "coureurs des bois". "Coureurs des bois" just sounds more familiar to me.

ERISS wrote:Sans aller jusqu'à parler le vieux françois, je pense qu'il faut utiliser le nom de l'époque (vous qui comptez les boutons des uniformes d'époque..).
"Coureur des bois" me semble une forme moderne parlée, mais "Coureur de bois" me semble la forme moderne littéraire/académique qui a probablement été conservée de l'ancienne forme.

Je n'en suis pas (encore ?) à compter les boutons des uniformes d'époque ! J'essayais seulement d'expliquer que, jusqu'ici, au cours de mes lectures, j'avais rencontré plus de "coureurs des bois" que de "coureurs de bois", et que, du coup, j'étais plus habitué aux premiers. Que "coureurs de bois" s'approche davantage de la dénomiation adoptée en Nouvelle-France et même en France aux XVII-XVIIIème siècles, je n'en sais rien. Mais je vais enquêter ! Je n'ai, en tout cas, absolument rien contre son utilisation dans le jeu Wars in America et ailleurs. Mais votons tous pour le départ de "courriers" ! Et merci encore à Fenris d'avoir soulever le lièvre (des bois...) !

User avatar
Philippe
AGEod Veteran
Posts: 753
Joined: Thu Oct 26, 2006 11:00 pm
Location: New York

Mon Apr 09, 2012 4:57 pm

"Coureurs des bois" sounds more familiar to you (as it does to me as well) because it's what you're more likely to encounter if someone were describing these people in modern french.

But we aren't dealing with how to express the concept in modern French, what we're worrying about is what these groups of people were called a l'epoque. Think of their name as the equivalent of a unit name, and then you'll see why the 18th century norm is more appropriate.

There's a unit in the British army called the Royal Welch Fusiliers (can't remember if they show up in the game or not, but I think they did send at least one battalion to North America during the War of Independance). No one in their right mind would ever suggest calling them the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, even though that is the form their name would be likely to take if it were recast into modern English.

"Coureurs de bois" works in a similar way. Both phrases are comprehensible in modern French, and are, in that limited sense, linguistically correct. But according to Professor Madeleine Dobie of Columbia University "coureurs de bois" is what you would see in the period, so that would be the correct name for the unit. Coureurs des bois works as a description in modern French if you aren't trying to give the unit an accurate designation in period French. That's why she gave me the link to Montcalm's journal which I posted earlier in this thread.

I had originally leaned towards "des bois" myself, until Professor Dobie set me straight. For those who aren't familiar with the American University system, Columbia's French Department is one of the best in the country and faculty slots are highly selective. Dr. Dobie studied at Oxford and Yale, and her areas of specialization are 18th Century French literature and colonial history. I simply can't imagine arguing a terminology point with someone with those kind of credentials, short of going through Montcalm's journal line by line and demonstrating (with citations) that he uses the plural five times as frequently as the singular. But he doesn't, so pushing for "des bois" over "de bois" is a bit of a non-starter.

User avatar
FENRIS
AGEod Guard of Honor
Posts: 1463
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2012 11:02 am
Location: Marseille (France)

Mon Apr 09, 2012 4:59 pm

Scaramouche wrote:You're welcome ! But I really think that "coureurs de bois" is as correct as "coureurs des bois". "Coureurs des bois" just sounds more familiar to me.


Je n'en suis pas (encore ?) à compter les boutons des uniformes d'époque ! J'essayais seulement d'expliquer que, jusqu'ici, au cours de mes lectures, j'avais rencontré plus de "coureurs des bois" que de "coureurs de bois", et que, du coup, j'étais plus habitué aux premiers. Que "coureurs de bois" s'approche davantage de la dénomiation adoptée en Nouvelle-France et même en France aux XVII-XVIIIème siècles, je n'en sais rien. Mais je vais enquêter ! Je n'ai, en tout cas, absolument rien contre son utilisation dans le jeu Wars in America et ailleurs. Mais votons tous pour le départ de "courriers" ! Et merci encore à Fenris d'avoir soulever le lièvre (des bois...) !


:thumbsup: ouais !! je suis très fier de ce lièvre, juste un peu surpris qu'il est tant tardé à sortir du terrier ! (le jeu est sorti depuis un moment
oui au départ de "courriers" et vive les coureurs des bois (les forêts sont grandes au Canada !:wacko :) et sus aux Anglais !!!

User avatar
Scaramouche
Private
Posts: 23
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2012 6:06 am
Location: Rennes (France)

Mon Apr 09, 2012 6:08 pm

Philippe wrote:But we aren't dealing with how to express the concept in modern French, what we're worrying about is what these groups of people were called a l'epoque. Think of their name as the equivalent of a unit name, and then you'll see why the 18th century norm is more appropriate.

If "coureurs de bois" seems more appropriate, it's ok with me. And be sure I wouldn't dare to contradict Professor Madeleine Dobie! (I hope not to find any "coureurs des bois" in an original text by Pouchot, Bougainville or anyone else who wrote on New-France while it was still existing...)
Anyway, thanks Philippe for giving us your so well argued point of view.

FENRIS wrote: :thumbsup: ouais !! je suis très fier de ce lièvre, juste un peu surpris qu'il est tant tardé à sortir du terrier ! (le jeu est sorti depuis un moment
oui au départ de "courriers" et vive les coureurs des bois (les forêts sont grandes au Canada !:wacko :) et sus aux Anglais !!!

C'est vrai, on est sûrement un peu trop passifs alors même que l'équipe d'Ageod ne demande qu'à améliorer ses jeux et qu'on a tous à y gagner. Ca me servira de leçon. A partir de maintenant, je ne laisse plus rien passer ! C'est pas grand chose mais quand même, on est davantage dans la French & Indian War avec des "coureurs" qu'avec des "courriers" !

User avatar
FENRIS
AGEod Guard of Honor
Posts: 1463
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2012 11:02 am
Location: Marseille (France)

Mon Apr 09, 2012 6:28 pm

Cà c'est bien vrai !! j'ai toujours un arrière goût d'inachevé quand je vois courriers et que je joue cette super campagne !
comme quand on voit tous les types de soldats habillés en grenadiers de la garde dans les soi-disant films historiques :( :bonk:

marechalCAMBRONNE
Lieutenant
Posts: 100
Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2011 3:33 pm

Thu Apr 12, 2012 11:32 pm

En fait, pour être justement dans des lectures de manuscrits de l'époque dans mes recherches de maîtrise, on appelait ces groupes d'irréguliers canadiens de 3 manières. Coureurs DES bois, voyageurs et les "partis" (guerre de partis)

User avatar
Scaramouche
Private
Posts: 23
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2012 6:06 am
Location: Rennes (France)

Fri Apr 13, 2012 7:17 am

Fichtre ! Merci pour ces nouveaux éléments qui relancent l'affaire !

User avatar
Scaramouche
Private
Posts: 23
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2012 6:06 am
Location: Rennes (France)

Fri Apr 13, 2012 4:18 pm

Fichtre ! Voilà l'affaire relancée... et peut-être close par la même occasion puisqu'il semblerait que les groupes de mots "coureurs de bois" et "coureurs des bois" soient pertinents pour désigner ces "voyageurs" à la manière de l'époque ET corrects du point de vue du français actuel ; et ce, qu'il s'agisse de renvoyer aux individus ou à une unité de combat constituée de ces derniers. Une conclusion qui contenterait tout le monde... sauf les"courriers" !
Que les "coureurs de(s) bois" peuplent donc les forêts de la Nouvelle-France dans Wars in America et ailleurs sans risquer de froisser qui que ce soit !

marechalCAMBRONNE
Lieutenant
Posts: 100
Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2011 3:33 pm

Fri Apr 13, 2012 8:55 pm

Je n'ai jamais vu "de" bois dans AUCUN texte d'époque. Aucun ;)

User avatar
FENRIS
AGEod Guard of Honor
Posts: 1463
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2012 11:02 am
Location: Marseille (France)

Fri Apr 13, 2012 10:05 pm

D'après moi, c'est tout à fait logique : dans les bois, il y a beaucoup d'arbres !! :wacko: donc, si tu es un super trappeur luttant contre l'HOOORRIBLE british dans
les forêts du Canada, bien entendu tu te faufiles entre les arbres... ;) résultat des courses : un brave coureur des bois !!! et un vil serviteur de la couronne britannique en moins... Vive notre bon roy et la Nouvelle-France ! tous à Albany !! :mdr:

User avatar
FENRIS
AGEod Guard of Honor
Posts: 1463
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2012 11:02 am
Location: Marseille (France)

Wed Apr 18, 2012 4:04 pm

re-salut les gars ! installé 1.10a, c'est super de voir les "coureurs de Langlade" ! :mdr: :happyrun:

User avatar
Scaramouche
Private
Posts: 23
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2012 6:06 am
Location: Rennes (France)

Wed Apr 18, 2012 5:56 pm

Merci pour l'info FENRIS ! Je télécharge le patch au plus vite !

Et je profite du post pour me proposer comme adversaire (humain donc...) pour une partie sur la French & Indian War. Je précise qu'il s'agirait pour moi d'une première contre un adversaire humain à Wars in America. Si quelqu'un est intéressé, qu'il tire trois coups de canon !

User avatar
FENRIS
AGEod Guard of Honor
Posts: 1463
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2012 11:02 am
Location: Marseille (France)

Wed Apr 18, 2012 7:28 pm

Scaramouche wrote:Merci pour l'info FENRIS ! Je télécharge le patch au plus vite !

Et je profite du post pour me proposer comme adversaire (humain donc...) pour une partie sur la French & Indian War. Je précise qu'il s'agirait pour moi d'une première contre un adversaire humain à Wars in America. Si quelqu'un est intéressé, qu'il tire trois coups de canon !


Bonne chance, je ne suis pas encore candidat (un peu trop novice) mais très interessé si AAR ! moi je me lance contre l'IA, je passe de BOA à WIA et j'ai attendu le dernier patch et en plus il y a eu cette histoire de coureurs !! bon maintenant je vais me relancer avec plaisir dans la defense de la Nouvelle-France. :indien:

de toute façon, je sais pas comment çà marche les parties en PBEM :)

Return to “Quartier-général "BoA2: Wars in America"”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest