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Over the Hills and Far Away-GB 75 AAR

Sun Oct 15, 2006 11:54 pm

1775-1783 Campaign AAR-Great Britain, Difficulty level, Hard AI Normal:

Excerpts from: Over the Hills and Far Away- A Precise history of the British Experience in the Colonial War 1775-1783

O'er the hills and o'er the main
Through Flanders, ‘merica and Spain.
King George commands and we obey
Over the hills and far away.
There's forty shillings on the drum
To those who volunteer to come,
To 'list and fight the rebs today
Over the Hills and far away.



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General Gage.





From Chapter 2-It Begins:

April 20th 1775

General Thomas Gage was not a happy man by this point. After several conferences with Smith and the other officers involved in the Concord debacle he made preparations for defense of Boston proper. His substantial force now seemed all too small. New reports were coming in from the countryside that the Rebels were marching on Boston with ever increasing numbers. All of the ringleaders (the Adams’, Hancock, Warren and Revere) were still at large, add to that the morale of his force was shaken.

Gage proceeded to pen three documents that would change the course of the conflict. The first was a general proclamation in his capacity as Governor-General of Massachusetts.

The key paragraph:

“To the citizens of Massachusetts, His Majesty’s government has done everything to avoid conflict but elements within our own ranks have pushed this now to the point where open conflict is upon us. It has been the action of such criminals that has created the insurrection that is now present. The time for discourse is now over, each of you must make the choice to submit to His Majesty’s will or be branded as a traitor and a common criminal. The choice is yours. If you swear loyalty to the crown and submit to Royal Authority you will be welcome. If you do not you will be an enemy of His Majesty and justice will be swift.”

The Second was the order of the day to his beleaguered Army:
“To the brave Soldiers who have the honor to serve His Majesty, the time has come to rise to the challenge before you. In each of you rests the duty to enforce the laws and destroy the rebellion that is facing Massachusetts. You did not ask for this fight but it is now here. And for each of you the glory of assured victory awaits. His Majesty and Parliament are looking to you for salvation in these Colonies, and they will not be disappointed. I am honored to lead you into battle.”

The third was a private message to Lord Germain, the relationship between the two has strained, Germain openly criticized Gage for being too lenient with the colonials and causing the very insurrection Gage was fighting. Gage stated to Germain that “ I can not stress the point enough, the army in the Boston area is not nearly enough to do the job. Nothing short of massive reinforcement will begin to show the strength of our resolve. Again I state that both foreign mercenaries and natives will need to be used, and each must be sued mercilessly. I will need strong capable commanders and the services of the Royal Navy.”

All of this would be borne out of course. Gage had 6 line regiments, 2 Light and only a small amount of artillery and horse. And to get this he had to strip most of North America. Canada and the western holdings were under defended. His greatest fear after Boston was a Canadian uprising, despite his time as Governor of Upper Canada and the good he had done he was still afraid that the French colonists would revolt. He was in constant correspondence with Guy Carleton and had given Guy authority over Canada and the west. Guy had been less than happy with the responsibility due to the lack of resources. As far as the other colonies Gage had no idea on who could be counted on, Dunmore had talked about raising a militia and there was some Colonial units, but their loyalty was suspect at best.

Also within the week he had to deal with the worst Rebel of all, his wife. He had suspected that she had been feeding Dr. Joseph Warren information for several weeks now. She was a Massachusetts native and very sympathetic, he sent her on the first packet home after Concord.

No Thomas Gage was not a happy man….

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Into the Malestrom Spring '75

Mon Oct 16, 2006 5:56 am

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Brigadier James Grant
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Governor Guy Carlton


From Chapter 3:

Timeline
Boston April 22nd Ward’s army strikes Boston, Gage’s Army fights well and is victorious. Gage is amazed at the fighting qualities of the Rebel Militia. 17th Light Dragoons and 3rd Light Infantry are bled white in order for Line regiments to deploy properly. Huge losses for Rebel army as Gage repulses Ward’s army. Over 500 British casualties, rebel casualties at least twice that number.
Quebec April 22nd Guy Carlton sets off from Quebec by bateaux for Montreal. With him are the 17th Royal Fusiliers and a large store of munitions.
London April 25th London receives word of Lexington and Concord. Parliament meets throughout the week passing several emergency measures. King deeply concerned and confers with North and his cabine. Expeditionary force organized to reinforce Gage. Germain expresses to North concern that Gage is not the man for the job, begins to promote William Howe to North and House of Commons.
Boston April 27th War council in Boston, Leadership divided Gage urges caution while Grant wants to counter attack. “We got hurt but they are bleeding” Grant states. Ring around Boston now just a blockade led by Warren. Main Rebel army is licking its wounds in Cambridge. Gage reaches compromise, most of the army will stay in Boston while Grant and Smith lead raid to secure New Bedford and the Cape Cod fisheries. Grant’s force will include the 64th Foot, the 22nd Foot and the 43rd Foot.
Southern Colonies Late April, several regiments of Colonial troops raise for the King in Augusta Georgia and Fort Ninety-Six in South Carolina.
St. Johns Canada April 28th, Major Prescott calls off plans to relieve Fort Ticonderoga, he simply does not have enough men.
Concord May 2nd Gage and Grant defeat Warren in Second battle of Concord, Rebel army under Ward does not move to intercept. Warren outnumbered and defeated. Light British Casualties (23) Rebel Casualties in the hundreds as force disintegrates and flees to the countryside.
Montreal May 15th Carlton arrives in Montreal, fear of uprising by Quebecois are unsubstantiated as of now.
Ticonderoga May 16th, Rebels under Seth Warner approach Ticonderoga, Major Delaplaine is unaware of the movements. Champlain flotilla left a week earlier for the north.
New Bedford May 17th, Grant arrives with column, arrests Mayor and most of the town council; his troops burn several warehouses containing trade goods. Reports that Rebel army under Ward is approaching.
New Bedford May 18th, Battle of New Bedford. Grant commands the three regiments well but is outnumbered. Casualties are high in proportion. 150 for the British and over 250 for the Rebels. Grant forced to retreat or else be cut off from Boston.
Boston May 21st Grant’s exhausted column reaches Boston. Gage confers with staff and serious consideration is given to withdrawing north if relief does not arrive. Boston citizens begin to get restless and morale among Gage’s army is low.
St. John’s May 21st native Chiefs from the Caughnawaga villages sign agreement with Major Prescott and fight for the King. Begin by scouting south around Ticonderoga.
Boston May 23rd rumors of a second attack on Boston abound, Sons of Liberty armbands worn openly by citizens. Gage begins to despair until the HMS Amphylon is sited off the coast, her Captain notifying Gage that the relief fleet is days away.
Ticonderoga May 24th Ticonderoga falls without a shot fired. Entire garrison of 52 men taken. Delaplaine is found hiding under his bed by Seth Warner and Ethan Allen.
Boston May 26th Admiral Richard Howe’s Fleet arrives in Boston with Royal Expeditionary force, which includes Major Generals William Howe, Clinton and Burgoyne.

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Maps for Spring 75

Mon Oct 16, 2006 7:38 am

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April 20th Siege of Boston, Ward moves to assault.

April 22nd Bloody battle for Boston-British Victory
(Document lost to history)

Lost: 17th Light Dragoons, 2nd Light Infantry.

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Early May State of Army after Battle of Boston.

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April-May Carleton to Reinforce Montreal.

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May- Ticonderoga is in danger of being overrun, Natives moving south to scout, lake shipping fleeing north.

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Plan for May, Grant and Smith to clear rebels out of Boston and Secure Cape Cod fisheries, Gage and majority of army to dig in and defend Boston proper.

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Spring ’75 Germain and Cabinet unprepared to fight long war, Press gangs appear in London.

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Spring '75 Few areas of the colonies openly declare for the King, Georgia and western South Carolina are 2 of them.

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May 2nd Second battle of Concord:
Gage supports Grand and Jones, clears out Warren from Boston area, Royal Army redeems itself and seizes the initiative.

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May 18th Battle of New Bedford:
Ward anticipates move by Grant, Jumps column and Regulars fight well but are forced to withdraw.

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Mon Oct 16, 2006 7:49 am

save your file in jpeg, I think you are using 256 colors GIF format and it can be prettier!
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Hofstadter's Law: "It always takes longer than you expect, even when you take into account Hofstadter's law."

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Mon Oct 16, 2006 8:18 am

Thanks

They are Jpegs unfortunatly I am losing translation with my screenshots. Do you know the best way to do a screen shot without losing resloution?

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Mon Oct 16, 2006 8:21 am

I see you have them resized too. Just a question, BOA does not appears in 256 colors when you play it? If so, switch your desktop settings to 16 bits colors.

I suggest you download a freeware like Irfanview. In BOA, press "print screen". Reduce the game, launch Irfan and paste the image (ctrl-v). It should appears untouched. Then save in jpeg or png. You can then upload them with image shack or any other sites of this kind.
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Hofstadter's Law: "It always takes longer than you expect, even when you take into account Hofstadter's law."

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Mon Oct 16, 2006 8:29 am

Pocus wrote:I see you have them resized too. Just a question, BOA does not appears in 256 colors when you play it? If so, switch your desktop settings to 16 bits colors.

I suggest you download a freeware like Irfanview. In BOA, press "print screen". Reduce the game, launch Irfan and paste the image (ctrl-v). It should appears untouched. Then save in jpeg or png. You can then upload them with image shack or any other sites of this kind.


Well Live and learn :) Thanks for the Tip I tried it out and it works like a charm. The pictures will improve I promise ;) .

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Summer '75 The Fires Spread

Tue Oct 17, 2006 6:33 am

Excerpts from Chapter 4 Summer ’75: The Fires Spread
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Captain Jordan Hyle

..One of the junior members of Howe’s staff was Captain Jordan Hyle, a loyal American freshly back from Ireland. He was a well educated and well traveled man, especially for his young age. His family had a long military tradition fighting both for the Crown and against it (His grandfather was a Jacobite.) he was also brave, conscientious and best of all for history’s purpose a diligent journalist and correspondent. Captain Hyle gives us a very vivid picture of those fortuitous months.

That picture was a mixture of earnestness and lassitude. He remarks on every thing from staff meetings to prices of common goods.

“We know that only action would solve this persistent problem, but everything but action tends to come from generals lips.”

A concise way of putting it, Gage himself went back and forth from grand plans to despondence. The battles in the spring put a damper on the ability of a small force to hold sway over Massachusetts and the arrival of the reinforcements, while doubling his force still seemed small for the task.

During that very hot summer, the Expeditionary force made elaborate defensive plans for Boston. They kept a monitor over the Rebel Army in New Bedford (still under Ward). They also displayed friction amongst themselves, especially Gage, Burgoyne and Clinton, Howe tended to remain close to each and even closer with the men of the army. Burgoyne also threw himself in composing a play during this time.

Gage pled for more men and material in dispatches to London but also realized that he needed to move before the end of the summer. He and his officers were also realizing that the rebellion was spreading throughout New England and beyond. Reports of uprisings in Virginia and the South were coming by courier weekly.

Finding out that the Rebel Army (now stylized as the Continental army) was under a new commander, an ex Colonel (of Colonials) named Washington, a Virginian. Gage realized that he needed to crush this army before it became too large. The resulting Newport campaign was the result. Quiet June and July would become a bloody August.

Time Line
Boston June Gage integrates new forces for defense of Boston. Recieves word that Continental Congress is meeting in Philadelphia and pro Rebel Militias are rising in each colony. He sends dispatches to North’s Cabinet weekly by packet ship. Gage now has 14 line Regiments, 2 Grenadier, 2 Fusilier, a Marine battalion, over 50 field pieces. American Squadron is 9 Ships of the Line plus several frigates. Replacements trickle in to depleted Regiments.
Montreal June Carleton receives orders from Gage to reinforce Oswego. He reluctantly sends 7th Royal Fusiliers via bateaux. Gages states “a show of force will influence the Iroquois to fight for the King.”
Ticonderoga June Rebels seize Lake Champlain shipping, collect it for military purposes. Erie shipping leaves colonies for Canada to escape the same fate.
Boston June 12th, 2 additional ships of the line arrive to bolster American Squadron.
Fort Ninety-Six July Colonel Brown of the South Carolina Loyalists moves a regiment to Augusta to defend against insurgents. “We are the true Americas and we are at His Majesty’s disposal.”
Ticonderoga July 6th Natives raid Ticonderoga outskirts, burning farms and attacking settlers. 14 settlers dead over the next week.
Canada July 10th Ethan Allen and his rebels attack Fort St. John but are repulsed by Prescott.
Oswego July 15th Relief fleet arrives. 7th Fusiliers and Supplies landed. Americans have been besieging Oswego for the past 15 days.
Canada July 15th Ilse De La Noix captured by Ethan Allen.
Boston July 20th Gage made aware that Washington has taken command of the Continental Army and that the secret Continental Congress is meeting.
Boston Late July Gage prepares campaign against Washington. Plan is to strike directly at New Bedford and to pursue and destroy rebel army.
Boston July 31st Gage, Howe and Clinton give marching orders. Majority of army with Gage, Burgoyne garrisons Boston with the rest.
Massachusetts August 9th , first contact with Rebel army, small skirmishing.
Wareham Mass. August 10th Battle of Wareham: Howe’s brigades flank Washington causing rebels to withdraw. Gage orders sharp pursuit. Casualties 250 British to over 500 Rebel.
Attleboro Mass. August 15th Gage surprised, Washington’s army has turned to fight. Gage withdraws in late evening and prepares for battle the next day.
Attleboro Mass. August 16th Battle of Attleboro: Washington attacks but is repulsed by disciplined fire from line. Rebels break after only 2 hours of contact. Gage steps up pursuit. Casualties 250 British to over 1000 Rebel (mostly captured).
Kirby Corner Mass. August 25th Battle of Kirby Corner: Howe leading vanguard falls on rearguard of Benjamin Lincoln. Gage had let Washington escape northwards by a 2 day delay to rest. Casualties 50 British to 350 Rebel (mostly captured)
Newport R.I August 29th Gage arrives at Newport and rests. Since he left his baggage train at Boston his force is low on ammunition. He rests his men in order to have them fit to chase the Rebels and to wait for munitions via ship.
Norfolk Va, August 30th Rebel Militia capture Norfolk, Governor Murray flees to country side.
August Royalist regiments raised in Quebec (Scottish Highlanders), South Carolina and Virginia (including a militia of freed slaves).

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Summer '75 Maps

Tue Oct 17, 2006 7:30 am

Boston in the Summer
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Plan to Relieve Oswego
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Autumn ' 75: Resolve

Sun Oct 22, 2006 8:01 pm

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George III
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Gen. William Howe

“The cadets at Sandhurst debate the correctness to replace Gage after a string of victories. This is done in a mock trial in which the general is put on charges. Points are made on both sides; the lack of supplies and the lack of decisive pursuit compose the main case against him. This mock trial is conducted every year and every year it gets the same result. While Gage is praised in highest regard the verdict is to replace him.”

From Sandhurst Diary,


“When the unhappy and deluded multitude, against whom this force will be directed, shall become more sensible of their error, I shall be ready to receive the misled with tenderness and mercy.”

--George III at Parliament October 26th 1775

Timeline
Newport Early September: Gage settles into Newport with victorious but exhausted army. They are short of ammunition powder and basic stores. This has to do with the fact that Gage left the baggage train behind in Boston in order to increase his speed of march. He sends dispatches to Boston for Burgoyne to send relief column to re-supply his army.
Boston Early September: Burgoyne responds that supplies are on there way but rather by sea. Spies have reported that an amazingly resilient Washington has gathered reinforcements and is marching on Newport.
Quebec September: Loyal highlanders sent via bateaux to Montreal.
St. John’s Canada September: Prescott “requests” native raiders to move against Seth Warner and Mountain boys in northern Champlain.
Virginia September: Murray Lord Dunmore takes command of 2 new regiments outside of Norfolk. Orders proclamation that he will march on Williamsburg to: “arrest and hang the rebellious elements that now comprise the Assembly.” His regiment of freed slaves “Ethiopians” stitch “liberty” in their coats.
Western New York Colony September: Siege of Oswego continues, Rebels maintain blockade of town but little else is accomplished.
Newport September 13th: Frigate Daphne arrives with important dispatches from Boston and Britain. The first is that supplies will be arriving shortly, the second is even more important. Gage is recalled to London and William Howe is now named Commander in Chief of North America.
Il de la Noix September 13th Natives capture Champlain shipping as Rebels flee before them.
Newport September 20th: Richard Howe’s fleet arrives with supplies.
Salisbury North Carolina Late September: Loyalist capture town.
Virginia Late September: Dunmore captures Portsmouth, Petersburg and Richmond. Support for crown is on the rise in the colony.
Newport September 30th: Washington arrives with Rebel Army, Howe does not come out to meet him. Siege of Newport begins.
Newport October: Washington is highly successful in siege of Newport. Parallel trenches are dug quickly and artillery begins to pound Howe’s positions. Howe is slow to react and begins plans to counter rebels.
Boston October: Burgoyne receives request to relieve siege in Newport. Responds that he does not have enough men for the job, also that Ethan Allen is now in Cambridge with a force of irregulars threatening his position. Recommends to Howe to evacuate Newport and rejoin his own force in Boston for winter.
Northern Colonies October: Early storms are a harbinger of an early and harsh winter.
Richmond Virginia October: Dunmore launches raids on Williamsburg and Yorktown; he receives word that Assembly has fled. He uses his “Ethiopian” regiment to strike fear in the hearts of the rebels. He sets up his new capital at Richmond.
Boston October 17th: After his numerous pleas to the effect, Burgoyne is recalled to Britain to raise force to reinforce Canada. Brigadier Francis Smith is placed in command of Boston. Howe is livid when he hears the news; he was counting on Burgoyne to lead the relief effort of Newport.
Norwich N.H October 25th: Massacre of Norwich, Natives raid town and kill settlers, John Adams at the Continental Congress in Philadelphia calls this the “most despicable event in any age.”
Virginia Late October: Dunmore’s “Ethiopians” capture Williamsburg and Yorktown, despite encouragement the slaves in the tidewater area are slow to respond with any insurrection against their white masters. Rebel armies retake Portsmouth.
London October 26th: His Majesty addresses both houses of Parliament. Debates and resolutions are passed swiftly in the House of Commons afterwards. Resolutions include: Expansion of Army and Navy, negotiations to begin with German princes for mercenary forces. Affirmation of use of natives against rebellion, and plans for the colonies after rebellion is put down. Most of the House is for decisive action but several are against notably Edmund Burke. About this time Lord Germain officially takes over cabinet post of Secretary of the Colonies, replacing the Earl of Dartmouth, Germain unofficially has been acting in this capacity for months. By the months end provisions to raise a force of 20,000 regulars has been completed.
Newport November: Howe concedes that Newport is a bad position and begins preparation for evacuation to Boston by sea.
Northern New England/New Colony November: Natives continue raids toward southern Champlain area.
Fort Niagara November: Colonel Hamilton begins preparations to arm Iroquois league and solicit their aid against the rebellion.
Oswego November: Rebels abandon siege due to harsh weather.
Newport November 5th: Howe and his army slip away from Newport under the nose of the Continental army (with the aid of his brother Richard), arrive in Boston on the 18th. Use of straw soldiers and fake gun emplacements fool Washington.
Virginia November: Latter raids prove successful and large amounts of war stores are captured from the rebels. Emboldened Dunmore moves his “Ethiopians” south toward Norfolk and issues a proclamation offering emancipation to any slave willing to fight for his Majesty, this makes Tory planters and London very worried that Dunmore may not be the right man for the job as Governor. Dunmore has also ignored reports that large rebel forces are moving toward him to quell any slave revolt. This proclamation would put a serious dampener on Loyalist feeling in the colony for years to come.
Fort Ninety-Six S. Carolina November: Rebels besiege fort Ninety-Six. Siege is disorganized and ineffective.
Quebec Late November: Royal Green Regiment is raised, contains many Quebecois. Fear of French-Canadian uprising seems now unfounded.
St. Edward New York November 25th: In the biggest raid yet Natives surprise Henry Knox, who has a large supply train complete with over 50 pieces of artillery. This was being sent from Ticonderoga to join Washington in Rhode Island. Knox and about 50 survivors escape, but all of the stores and guns fall in the hands of the Natives.

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Maps of Autumn '75

Sun Oct 22, 2006 9:19 pm

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Fiasco in Virginia Winter '75-76

Mon Oct 23, 2006 7:19 am

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Artist's rendering of the sinking of HMS Foxhound, note that it is shown in port and at night, both of which are inaccurate.

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Lord Dunmore

Fiasco in Virginia: Winter 75-76
Excerpt from Chapter 6:

It should be said that while Germain’s plan was sound, Dunmore should have been relieved before Grant arrived. The tragedy off Norfolk and the death of the new commander and Governor of Virginia left the army there in quite a bind. The official orders had been lost so there was only the word of Admiral Howe to go on. Even Brigadier Tryon had not been privy to the information beforehand. What then ensued was a larger force of regulars under poor and disjointed command. What happened in the spring was all too predictable.

“Lenity has had every bad Effect which can be imagined."
-General Grant in a dispatch to Parliament a week before departing to Virginia


Timeline
London Late November-Early December: Lord Germain works out strategy to cut southern colonies from the rebellious north by splitting them. The objective is the occupation of Virginia. Orders dispatch of first fleet of reinforcements under Admiral Parker (with an Army led by Lord Cornwallis) to Virginia Cape. Also issues orders to William Howe to immediately send reinforcements to rendezvous with Parker. Germain and North convince the King to sack Dunmore and replace him with Brigadier James Grant. James Grant is given rank of Major General in America along with governor of Virginia.
Northern New York Colony December: Natives attempt to return to St. John with artillery train. They plan to move by sled over iced Champlain.
Boston December: Grant receives messages from London and forms small force to be vanguard for larger force to come. General Howe reluctant to part with troops but relents and sends 3 regiments of the line (5th, 40th, and the 10th) plus a large amount of stores and the balance of his marines.) Lord Richard Howe leads fleet to transport Grant to Norfolk to begin campaign in Virginia.
Newport December: Washington occupies Newport with much fanfare.
Richmond December 11th: Loyalist garrison is attacked and overwhelmed during a daring night assault by Rebel Colonel Campbell. Few Casualties but majority of Loyalists taken prisoner. Dunmore flees Richmond dressed as a chambermaid. Flees as far as Williamsburg and sends dispatches to Boston ignorant that relief force is already on its way.
Atlantic Seaboard December: Drake with a squadron of 4 ships prowls the coast of the northern colonies looking for Rebel shipping.
Georgia December: Colonel Brown and his loyalists plan to raise siege of Ninety-Six.
Boston December: Replacements for lost companies arrive through the winter.
Virginia December: Rebels recapture most of Virginia except for Williamsburg and Yorktown.
Fort Ninety-Six December 12th: Brown raises siege after sharp skirmish.
Northern Champlain December: Rebel Colonel Seth Warner captures Champlain flotilla which is icebound at Ile de La Noix.
Southern Champlain December 24: Rebel Colonel Richard Montgomery and his New Yorkers ambush Natives as they attempt to move artillery train north on sleds. Known as the Skirmish on the Ice, the militia exact their revenge and kill all of the warriors.
Montreal Christmas day: Against protests from Guy Carlton, Montreal Militia disbands.
New England January: Rebel army splits during winter, most retire to New London under Washington. Howe orders Brigadier Francis Smith and the 44th foot to raid Massachusetts country side for supplies that the Rebels have stored.
Virginia Early January: Admiral Howe drops anchor off of Norfolk and he and Major General Grant confer on plan of attack.
• American Colonies January: Agents report that a large amount of the Rebel troops have disbanded due to terms of duty expiring and lack of pay.
Off Sandbridge Beach Virginia January 10-15: Admiral Howe’s fleet comes across several small Rebel Warships and some transports carrying Militia. Several chases ensue each fruitless. On January 14th several rebels in longboats from Norfolk slip past sentry ships during night and mine the 30 gun brig HMS Foxhound. Early the next morning the ship explodes as the mine blasts open the ships magazine. Over 50 seamen and soldiers are killed as they sleep including Major General Grant. Also incinerated were the orders relieving Lord Dunmore of his post as Governor.
Boston Late January: Brigadier Smith arrives back in Boston without much to show for his raids.
Virginia February: Admiral Howe and new army commander (Brigadier William Tryon) abandon idea of landing on Norfolk and move fleet up to the friendly port of Yorktown. They begin to disembark army. Problems of command ensue as Dunmore orders Tryon to Williamsburg. Richard Howe protests and states that Dunmore had been relieved. Command impasse ensues until Lord Howe relents and dispatches communiqués to his brother stating the stickiness of the situation. Howe also dispatches more warships after Rebel Transports and manages to sink one at the mouth of the river York.
Boston Late February: General Howe concedes command in Virginia to Dunmore for now but tries to dispatch a communication packet ship to intercept Cornwallis and Parker coming from Britain to confer command of Virginia to Cornwallis. Also reports that Washington and Greene (new General in command of Rhode Island) are in no shape to move against Howe in the late winter.

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Maps for Winter 75-76

Mon Oct 23, 2006 7:26 am

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Spring 76-Road to Kingston

Mon Oct 23, 2006 6:09 pm

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Rebel General Nathanial Greene



“Clinton could both be brilliant and petulant at the same time. The state of affairs that caused the disaster at Kingston truly rest on his shoulders. If he would have moved with earnestness to support Pigott the day would have been carried. It should also be stated, however that Howe himself presented himself as a stationary fighter. While later battles would acquit both of these black marks they still need to be documented. It should be noted while Kingston was a small battle in comparison to later actions the morale boost it gave to the Continentals was considerable.”

-General Jordan Hyle, Memoirs


“The reason they wear red boys is to hide the bleeding, Forward!”

-General Nathanial Greene leading the charge at the battle of Kingston


Timeline
Cape Fear Early March: Parkers fleet arrives and begins moving toward Norfolk, HMS Daphne intercepts to relay news of death of Grant and Dunmore’s “reinstatement” Parker and Cornwallis refuse to follow orders from Dunmore and fleet heads south for secondary objective, Savannah Georgia.
Boston March: Reports of Washington army fleeing New England filter to General Howe’s headquarters. Winter is still covering the area. Howe orders probing raid toward Rhode Island in two parts, main force led by Clinton while a sweeping faster force under Pigott would move on New Bedford then Newport. Clinton objects to this stating that Washington may still be out there and that Howe would remain in Boston with majority of the force. Clinton’s objections would prove fruitful but is should be stated that he was less than earnest in his marching orders.
Virginia March: Tryon moves 3 regiments toward Williamsburg to relieve the siege that has commenced. Rebels surround the town, which is being held by Dunmore and his Ethiopian regiment.
Caribbean March: Orders from Germain to governors of the Floridas and Jamaica, they are to send all necessary forces toward the colonies. Several regiments would be stripped to fight in America over the next few months.
Virginia March 15 Skirmish at Williamsburg: Colonel Tryon defeats Knox in a short but bloody affair. Raises siege and captures Knox’s baggage train.
Rhode Island March 20th Skirmish at Pawtucket: Pigott routs continental regiment after 15 minutes. Clinton is slow to meet with Pigott’s force.
Chester Virginia March 22nd: Battle of Chester Rebels counterattack Tryon’s force. British victory. 40th Regiment (Foot) has taken the blunt of the casualties of the last battles and would be decommissioned by end of month.
Rhode Island March 29th Battle of Kingston: Greene surprises Pigott (who did not know he was in the colony) routing the regulars. Lothian light Regiment captured. Pigott retreats to Providence where a slow moving Clinton covers his retreat.
Virginia March 30th Skirmish at Amelia Court House: Rebel Colonel Glover holds off Tryon and his superior force of Regulars for entire day. Battle is inconclusive and Tryon retreats towards Williamsburg because the morale of his men is low and they have not been able to re-supply. Glover and Knox move on Williamsburg and renew siege.
Atlantic Coast April: Admiral Drake captures 3 merchant men off of coast of New Jersey. This raid has met with some successes but would be noted for its lack of results overall. Drake is ordered to the Indies to begin shipping Caribbean regiments north.
Hailfax Nova Scotia April: Several Regiments are sent from Britain to reinforce garrison, General Howe orders those forces to be sent to Virginia. Admiral Howe is sent to Hailfax to ship them.
Georgia April: Cornwallis begins to debark forces to lay siege to Savannah. Rebels to not contest landing.
• Providence R.I April: Clinton camps at Providence along with the remnants of Pigott’s force. He is defending northern Rhode Island until General Howe moves against Rebels. Washington is again spotted in Connecticut with his Continental Army.
Boston April-May: General Howe awaits large convoy of reinforcements promised to him by North and Germain. He will wait for these before campaigning.
Virginia April-May: Tryon and Dunmore with their army are under siege in Williamsburg a serious breach in the defenses is made in May.
Georgia May: Siege of Savannah commences with little success, Colonel Brown moves his small Loyalist army to Augusta.

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Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 11:26 pm

Maps for Spring 76

Mon Oct 23, 2006 6:20 pm

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Irish Guards
Private
Posts: 28
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 11:26 pm

Sat Nov 18, 2006 2:05 am

I have more of this but I don't know if anyone is actually reading it. :nuts:

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Korrigan
AGEod Guard of Honor
Posts: 1982
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2005 12:33 pm
Location: France

Sat Nov 18, 2006 7:49 am

Yes we are.

I enjoy greatly both your AAR and you historical work which give a real flavour to it. :coeurs:
"Never argue with a fool, onlookers may not be able to tell the difference." Mark Twain

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Pocus
Posts: 24958
Joined: Wed Oct 19, 2005 7:37 am
Location: Lyon (France)

Sat Nov 18, 2006 8:06 am

I read it. I will only post on comment on game mechanic interrogations or problems though.
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Hofstadter's Law: "It always takes longer than you expect, even when you take into account Hofstadter's law."

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Ayeshteni
Captain
Posts: 157
Joined: Sat Aug 12, 2006 10:47 pm
Location: Ecosse

Sat Nov 18, 2006 6:03 pm

Still reading.

Ayeshteni

Irish Guards
Private
Posts: 28
Joined: Sun Oct 15, 2006 11:26 pm

Tue Nov 21, 2006 2:36 am

Well then there will be an update soon.

flintlock
Captain
Posts: 182
Joined: Sat Oct 07, 2006 9:20 pm

Tue Nov 21, 2006 3:35 am

I'm following it too. :)

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Hobbes
Posts: 4366
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2006 12:18 am
Location: UK

Thu Nov 23, 2006 10:22 am

Me also! Top AAR
Cheers, Chris

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