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pasternakski
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Sat Apr 28, 2007 6:08 pm

LMUBill wrote:Any chance of making this optional? Or at the very least put it at the bottom of the tooltip so other information is not hidden?


Yah. First thing I'd wanna do is shut the d@mned thing off [grumble, mumble]

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Korrigan
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Sat Apr 28, 2007 6:40 pm

rickd79 wrote:Where are these bio's going to be collected? Should a new forum or thread be opened up? Alternatively, I suppose biographical information could be collected in each General's post in the officer rating forum.



I have created for you a dedicated forum next to the Officers room.

Good luck!

Korrigan
"Never argue with a fool, onlookers may not be able to tell the difference." Mark Twain

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Sunray
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Sun Apr 29, 2007 4:49 pm

OK, I'll do the "quality control" and the translations. Remember, we need "basic pre-war stuff to give the player a little insight into what that officer was doing before 1861", including state and date of birth (year only), military experience, most important feats (in very short), situation in 1861 and any political ties.

This is a first version for all 2+ stars (initial rank) CSA Generals :

Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard
- Born in 1818 in Louisiana
- Was related to a senator and to a former State Governor
- West Point class of 1838
- Distinguished himself during the Mexican-American War, his bold leadership earned him two field promotions
- Briefly entered politics in New Orleans in 1858
- Career officer, superintendent of the West Point Academy.

Samuel Cooper
- Born in 1798 in New York
- West Point class of 1815
- Served in the Seminole War
- Received a brevet promotion to colonel for his War Department service in the Mexican-American War
- Career officer, Adjutant General since 1852.

Theophilus Hunter Holmes
- Born in 1804 in North Carolina
- West Point class of 1829
- Served in the Seminole War and in the Mexican-American War
- Career officer, received a full promotion to Major in 1855

Albert Sidney Johnston
- Born in 1803 in Kentucky
- West Point class of 1826
- Served in the Black Hawk War and in the Texas War of Independence
- Secretary of War of the Republic of Texas
- Served as inspector general of the volunteers in the Mexican-American War
- Led the combined U.S. forces in the Utah War
- Career officer, received a brevet promotion to Brigadier General in 1857, in command of the Department of the Pacific

Joseph Eggleston Johnston
- Born in 1807 in Virginia
- Was related to a member of President Jackson's cabinet, to a Congressman and to a Senator
- West Point class of 1829
- Served in the Seminole War
- Received two brevet promotions in the Mexican-American War
- Career officer, was appointed Quartermaster General of the U.S. Army in 1860.

Thomas Jonathan Jackson
- Born in 1824 in Virginia
- West Point class of 1846
- Distinguished himself during the Mexican-American War, his bold leadership earned him two field promotions
- Career officer, instructor at Virginia Military Institute

Robert E. Lee
- Born in 1807 in Virginia
- Son of a former State Governor
- West Point class of 1829, he attained the top academic record
- Distinguished himself during the Mexican-American War, his initiatives as a staff officer earned him a promotion to Colonel.
- Career officer, serving in Texas

Leonidas Polk
- Born in 1806 in North Carolina
- West Point class of 1827
- Resigned his commission to be ordained as a deacon
- Was elected Bishop of Louisiana in 1841

Any comment ? :cwboy:

tc237
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Mon Apr 30, 2007 4:52 am

Great!!

Let's set a standard structure.

-Born (include Age here also)
-West Point or school if any
-Military experience, achievements, promotions, duty, etc...
-Politics, family, powerful friends, etc..
-Current pre-war to 1861 status, as best we can find, doesn't have to be perfect.

This will give us 4-7 lines per officer. Not a limiting factor, but don't think we want too many more. It will start too look cluttered.

It might all seem like nit-picking but it is more professional to have all bios setup the same. IMHO of course.

Any suggestions?

I'll start on the Union officers A-L for now.
Anyone else want a help?

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Pocus
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Mon Apr 30, 2007 8:04 am

the tooltip is not limited in size (don't write a book though), and will only appears on the general face, so is not invasive.
Do not enter carriage returns in the final version, insert § (without spaces) between 2 lines. Like

-Born (include Age here also)§-West Point or school if any
Image


Hofstadter's Law: "It always takes longer than you expect, even when you take into account Hofstadter's law."

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Sunray
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Mon Apr 30, 2007 12:00 pm

Excellent suggestions, thanks.
tc237 wrote:Born (include Age here also)


When ? Age in 1861 ? Age when he arrives in the game ?

I'll translate all the stuff in French.

Who'll begin the CSA 1-stars generals ?

:siffle:

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marecone
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Mon Apr 30, 2007 1:29 pm

I say you go for this project although I would like more info there. One of the reasons I became ACW freak are these bios. If 15 years ago I bought the game and it told me that some guy was a farmer I wouldn't care.
But Frank Hunter's old game had all of it. Short and sweet. Prewar, war and postwar... I started reading about Forrest, Lee, Grant and other heroes, and now, some years later I am beta tester for ACW games :sourcil:
Just my two cents.


P.S. It will be great even if we get those short bios. IMHO any add on is a good thing.
No hard feelings :cwboy:
Forrest said something about killing a Yankee for each of his horses that they shot. In the last days of the war, Forrest had killed 30 of the enemy and had 30 horses shot from under him. In a brief but savage conflict, a Yankee soldier "saw glory for himself" with an opportunity to kill the famous Confederate General... Forrest killed the fellow. Making 31 Yankees personally killed, and 30 horses lost...

He remarked, "I ended the war a horse ahead."

tc237
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Mon Apr 30, 2007 2:53 pm

Sunray,
Age in 1861

I'm going to start with the Leader pdf.
Do you have a suggestion for a file that lists all generals in the game I could use?

Pocus,
Which portrait will this tool-tip work for?
The portrait in the Detail Box? or any portrait?

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arsan
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Mon Apr 30, 2007 4:43 pm

marecone wrote:I say you go for this project although I would like more info there. One of the reasons I became ACW freak are these bios. If 15 years ago I bought the game and it told me that some guy was a farmer I wouldn't care.
But Frank Hunter's old game had all of it. Short and sweet. Prewar, war and postwar... I started reading about Forrest, Lee, Grant and other heroes, and now, some years later I am beta tester for ACW games :sourcil:
Just my two cents.


P.S. It will be great even if we get those short bios. IMHO any add on is a good thing.
No hard feelings :cwboy:



I completely agree with Marecone

Sorry, but i think the "only pre-war information" makes no sense when you have historical leaders with mostly fixed combat values and fixed special abilities. :bonk:

It would make sense if the values or abilities were hidden and more o less random generated.

But now, if i have a 1-0-0 "dispirited leader" and "slow mover" historical leader... I WANT TO KNOW what the hell he did in the ACW to credit such an awful ratings!
I don´t mind if he was a lawyer before war :8o:

I think your only "pre-war" idea leaves out A LOT of players who are interested in the ACW but are by no means experts

I am interested in this period but only know something about a dozen leaders (Lee, Grant, Jackson, Sherman, McClellan...) :siffle:

I would love to learn about others 150 and appreciate their in game ratings without having to search in google.

For ACW experts, like many of you, Bios aren't necessary. You know and understand why, when and how Lyons or Early "won" his ratings...and many also even know where they were born or what was his job...

Please, don´t leave the rest of us in the dark! :p leure:

I have been asking about this on-game bios for sometime. But if i and the rest of "novice ACW" will only get "pre-war" information, it will have no use at all for us.

Please, give us pre-war, post-war and most of all, IN WAR info on the bios!!!

Don't alienate the newbies!!!

Just my two cents

Cheers

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Sunray
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Mon Apr 30, 2007 4:51 pm

marecone wrote:One of the reasons I became ACW freak are these bios. If 15 years ago I bought the game and it told me that some guy was a farmer I wouldn't care.


15 years ago you probably had no access to internet and almost unlimited information resources, including biographies. Try to search google for "robert edward lee biography" : you get no less than 819 results !

I was very surprised myself when I first thought of the 'pre-war' option, but I like it :
(a) it's logical (the future hasn't yet happened in the game),
(b) it's immersive (a C-in-C is supposed to check his archives before offering a promotion)
(c) it's probably more interesting for the old salts who buy the game. Of course you knew that Robert E. Lee was a "exceptional battlefield tactician, though hampered by lack of materials" and that "his strategy was daring always, and he never hesitated to take the gravest risks". But did you knew that he attained the top academic record of West Point (he never received a single demerit in four years)? Or that Ulysses S. Grant had his fair share of demerits and said the happiest day of his life was "the day I left West Point" ?

And, BTW, it's faster to do (believe me, it takes time to summarize Lee's biography in 15 lines).

Any suggestion welcome.

Cheers

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Sunray
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Mon Apr 30, 2007 5:06 pm

arsan wrote:if i have a 1-0-0 "dispirited leader" and "slow mover" historical leader... I WANT TO KNOW what the hell he did in the ACW to credit such an awful ratings!


Unfortunately, we don't have 200-300 hours to make this "complete biography" project a reality.

arsan wrote:I don´t mind if he was a lawyer before war


This info is really secondary indeed. OTOH, if you were Lincoln, dont you think that "military experience" or "powerful friends or relatives" are of the highest importance when you select a new 3-stars general ?

By the way, this Forums is dedicated to "Generals Biographers", so it could be a perfect place to post bigger biography files!

Cheers

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Sunray
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Mon Apr 30, 2007 5:17 pm

Sunray wrote:By the way, this Forums is dedicated to "Generals Biographers", so it could be a perfect place to post bigger biography files!Cheers


This is what I'd done already (for the US generals - still partial) :

William W. AVERELL

Averell was a career cavalry officer. He was given commanded of a mounted brigade in the Peninsula campaign and at the battle of Fredericksburg. He then ascended to division commands and claimed victory against the Confederate cavalry at Kelly's Ford. He was relieved from duty for poor performance during a cavalry raid in the battle of Chancellorsville. He still fought a serie of minor engagements and raids in Virginia at the brigade and division level. He was relieved of command again in Sept. 1864, following a dispute with Gen. Sheridan, and this time was not given another combat command.

Nathaniel P. BANKS

As a political appointee, but with no military experice, Banks was named a
major general and given divisional and departmental command near Washington early in the war. He was routed by Gen. Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley campaign and at Cedar Mountain. In the Gulf area, he led the costly siege of Port Hudson and the dismal Red River campaign.
His field career was rather desastrous but his appointment served its
purpose in rallying support for the war effort.

Gen. Don Carlos BUELL

In Washington in September 1861, Buell helped organize the Army of the
Potomac under McClellan. He then led the Army of the Ohio into Tennessee and took a notable part in the battle of Shiloh. He lost his field command for
failing to follow up the retreating CSA after the battle of Perryville.

Ambrose E. BURNSIDE

Burnside, as commander of the Rhode Island militia, was one of the few experienced officers of the North and ideally qualified for an important command at the outbreak of the Civil War. Within a month, he ascended to brigade command at First Bull Run then successfully led a Corps of the Army of the Potomac in the expeditions against the North Carolina coasts and eventually accepted to take command of the whole Army of the Potomac. His urged attack toward Richmond was countered in a costly defeat at Fredericksburg, however. Burnside was then assigned to command the Department of the Ohio until the spring of 1864, when he commanded again a Corps in Virginia. He later received the blame for the fiasco of the battle of the Crater and was relieved of command.
Burnside also invented a breechloading carabine which was extensively used during the war.

Benjamin F. BUTLER

At the outset of the war, Butler’s contingent of Massachusetts militia was one of the first to reach Washington. He then restored order in secessionist Baltimore and was named military governor of New Orleans. There his highhanded rule infuriated the people of the South and earned him the name "Beast". He suffered several defeats as commander of the Army of the James and was removed from active command in Dec. 1864.

George A. CUSTER

Custer distinguished himself by his personal bravery in aggressive cavalry actions and became brigadier general at the age of 23, despite having no direct command experience. He fought at Gettysburg, was promoted to division command and took part in most cavalry actions of Virginia.
This distinguished war record has been overshadowed in history by his role and fate in the Indian Wars of 1876, however.

Jefferson C. DAVIS

Davis was promoted to division command in 1861 and fought at the battles of Pea Ridge and Corinth. He then went on sick leave, but he killed a superior officer during his convalescence. He returned to active duty and avoided conviction for this murder because the Union Army desesperatly needed capable field commanders like him. He never received the second star of a major general though.

Abner DOUBLEDAY

As a career officer defending Fort Sumter, Doubleday fired the first US shot of the war. He was promoted to brigade then division command in Virginia and led his men into the deadliest fightings at Antietam. He later played a pivotal role in the Battle of Gettysburg where his Corps was essentially destroyed as a combat force. He held no further active command.

John C. FREMONT

As a General, Fremont's major Civil War contribution was more political than military when he focused Union attention on the role emancipation should play in the North’s war policy by his (unprecedented and unauthorized) "proclamation" of 1861. Lincoln, who was very concerned by the support of the slave-holding borderstates, revoked this proclamation and removed Fremont from command. He was very popular however and Lincoln gave him another appointment at the head of the army’s new Mountain Department. He then suffered a severe defeat during the Shenandoah Valley Campaign and was eventually relieved at his own request when ordered to serve under Gen. Pope.

En tant qu’officier général, la contribution principale de Frémont a été plus politique que militaire lorsqu’il attira l’attention de l’Union sur le rôle joué par l’émancipation dans la politique militaire du Nord grâce à sa "proclamation" (sans précédent et sans autorisation) de 1861. Lincoln, très soucieux de conserver le soutien des états-frontières esclavagistes, révoqua cette proclamation et démit Frémont de son commandement. Compte tenu de sa grande popularité, Lincoln lui confia encore la direction militaire du nouveau Département des Montagnes. Il subit cependant une grave défaite pendant la campagne de la vallée de la Shenandoah et demanda lui-même à démissionner lorsqu’il dut servir sous les ordres du Général Pope.

Quincey A. GILLMORE

By the time the Civil War began, Gillmore was a 1st Lt. of the Corps of Engineers. He was greatly admired when he captured Fort Pulaski in April, 1862, using the new rifled artillery. Such fortifications (called third system forts) were considered invincible. He helped to bring about the capture of Morris Island and Fort Wagner as well as the destruction of Fort Sumter. He also spent many years after the war to improve fortifications and harbours on the Atlantic coast.

Lorsque la guerre civile éclata, Gillmore était un Lieutenant du Corps du Génie. Il devint célèbre en capturant le Fort Pulaski en avril 1862, grâce aux nouveaux canons à tube rayés. De telles fortifications (connues sous le nom de forts du troisième système) étaient considérées comme invincibles. Il participa ensuite à la capture de Morris Island et de Fort Wagner ainsi qu’à la destruction de Fort Sumter. Après la guerre, il se consacra pendant plusieurs années à l’aménagement des fortifications et des ports de la côte atlantique.

Ulysses S. GRANT

When the war began, Grant helped recruit Illinois volunteers and was appointed Colonel. After serving in different lesser commands, he commanded Union forces as a General then as General-In-Chief since March 1864. Grant had an intuitive knowledge of topography and never became confused in directing large bodies of men. His self-reliance and rapidity of thought enabled him to move troops in the presence of an enemy and contributed no small share to his successes. He has been described by military historian as the greatest general of his age and one of the greatest strategists of any age. In 1869 he was elected president of the United States.

Lorsque la guerre éclata, Grant participa au recrutement de volontaires en Illinois et fut nommé Colonel. Après avoir assumé différents commandements subalternes, il commanda les forces de l’Union, d’abord en tant que Général, puis, dès 1864, en tant que Général-en-Chef. Grant avait un sens inné de la topographie et n’était jamais troublé lorsqu’il devait diriger de grandes masses d’hommes. Son assurance et sa rapidité de penser lui permettaient de manœuvrer en présence de l’ennemi et ont contribué pour beaucoup à ses succès. Il a été décrit par des historiens militaires comme le plus grand général de son temps et un des plus grands stratèges de tous les temps. En 1869, il fut élu président des Etats-Unis.

Henry W. HALLECK

In the first days of the Civil War, Halleck's reputation as a military scholar earned him the rank of major general, making him the fourth most senior general in the Army. He commanded the Department of the Missouri and of the Mississippi. President Lincold appointed him general-in-chief in 1862, but Halleck was more a bureaucrat than a field commander and he was unable to impose his instructions to his subordinates. After two years he was relegated to chief of staff where he very effectively supplied, equipped, and reinforced the vast U.S. armies.

Winfield S. HANCOCK

When the Civil War broke out, Hancock was quickly promoted to brigade command. He assumed the command of a division at Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, then commanded the II Corps with distinction at Gettysburg where he was severely wounded. He participated in the Wilderness Campaign and in the Richmond Campaign but never regained full mobility and his former energy. Hancock was noted for his personal leadership.

George B. McCLELLAN

George McClellan had been observer in the Crimean War and had a large
experience of the European armies. He organised the famous Army of the
Potomac brilliantly but was constantly overestimating the strength of the
enemy facing him and was often reluctant to fight. He had some minor
successes in his Peninsula Campaign but the general outcome of his action
was negative and his command was transferred to John Pope. He was later
restored to active command the Maryland Campaign, but
failed to win a decisive battle. He relinquished command again in Nov. 1862
and was not given another.
McClellan was a brilliant engineer and a highly capable military organizer
but simply not an army commander.

Irvin McDOWELL

Despite never having commanded troops in combat, McDowell was promoted to Brig. Gen. in the first days of the war and given command of the inexperienced and unready Army of Northeastern Virginia. His overly complex strategy let to the disaster of First Bull Run. He was later blamed again in part for the defeat of Second Bull Run and was not given another major combat command.

Malgré qu’il n’avait jamais commandé de troupes au combat, McDowell fut promu Brigadier Général dans les premiers jours de la guerre et placé à la tête de l’armée de Virginie du Nord-Est, inexpérimentée et mal préparée. Ses plans exagérément complexes provoquèrent le désastre de First Bull Run. Il fut à nouveau blâmé pour sa participation dans la défaite de Second Bull Run et n’obtient plus de postes importants.

James B. McPHERSON

McPherson was Grant's Chief Engineer and played an important role in the capture of Fort Henry, Fort Donelson and Corinth. He was promoted to Corps command in the Vicksburg campaign, and commanded the Army of the Tennessee in the Atlanta campaign. He was killed in the Battle of Atlanta, on July 22, 1864.

George G. MEADE

Meade was a military engineer at the outbreak of the Civil War and was assigned to brigade command, then led competently a division in the Maryland Campaign. In the Battle of Antietam, Meade was given command of a Corps over other generals his superior in rank. He played a crucial role in the battle of Gettysburg, but was criticized for not aggressively pursuing the
Confederates during their retreat. He commanded the Army of the Potomac under Grant, but was overshadowed and frustrated by the direct supervision of the general-in-chief, who received most of the credit for the campaigns of 1864 and 1865.

William S. ROSECRANS

After some engineer duty in McClellan's staff at the begining of the war,
Rosecrans was promoted to brigadier general. His decisions proved extremely
effective in the West Virginia Campaign, but he received no credit for his
plans. He thus requested a transfer to the West theater, where he ably led
the Army of the Mississippi and the Army of the Cumberland. He was relieved
of command after his deafeat at Chickamauga and eventually was given command of the Department of Missouri until wars end.

Winfield SCOTT

A national hero after the Mexican War and a candidate to the presidential election of 1852, Scott (who was called "Old Fuss and Feathers" because of his devotion to military pomp and protocol) was 74 when he took command of the Union armies at the outset of the Civil War. He was then suffering from different infirmities and weighed more than 300 pounds, but he conceived the strategy known as the Anaconda Plan that would eventually be used to defeat the Confederacy. Blamed for the Union's dismal failures in the first months of the war, Lincoln accepted Scott's offer to resign on November 1, 1861.

Héro national après la guerre contre le Mexique et candidat aux élections présidentielles de 1852, Scott (qui était surnommé “le vieil amateur de cérémonie” à cause de son attachement pour le protocole militaire et les parades) était âgé de 74 ans lorsqu’il prit le commandement des armées de l’Union au début de la guerre civile. I souffrait de diverses infirmités et pesait 150 kg, mais il élabora la stratégie connue en tant que Plan Anaconda, grâce à laquelle la Confédération fut finalement battue. Scott fut accusé des graves échecs subis par l’Union dans les premiers mois de la guerre et remit sa démission à Lincoln, qui l’accepta le premier novembre 1861.

William T. SHERMAN

Sherman volunteered for service in the Union Army when the War started. His military career had repeated ups and downs but he is one of the most famous Northern General, receiving both recognition for his outstanding command of military strategy and criticism for the harshness of the destruction policy he implemented in conducting total war against the South. In that sense, he has been described by military historian as the first modern general. He is also noted for his absolute refusal to be drawn into politics.

Sherman se porta volontaire pour entrer dans l’armée de l’Union lorsque la guerre commença. Sa carrière militaire connu des hauts et des bas, mais il reste un des Généraux nordistes les plus célèbres, à la fois admiré pour sa maîtrise exceptionnelle de la stratégie militaire et critiqué pour la dureté de la politique de destruction qu’il a appliqué dans un guerre totale contre le Sud. C’est en ce sens qu’il est considéré par les historiens militaires comme le premier général moderne. Il est également connu pour avoir toujours refusé de se laisser entraîner dans la politique.

George H. THOMAS

Thomas was promoted in rapid succession in the first months of the Civil War. In command of an independent force, he defeated an early Confederate offensive campaign in eastern Kentucky at Mill Springs, gaining the first important Union victory of the war. He led the Army of the Cumberland to the victory at Chattanooga and Nashville and, at the same time, managed the logistics and engineering for his entire army group.

tc237
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Mon Apr 30, 2007 6:12 pm

This was meant, at the very beginning, to be a user made optional mod. I was prepared to do it all myself.
Just wanted to ask Pocus what files to edit. Did not intend to get Ageod involved at all. I'm thankful that Sunray is lending a hand.
I'm a bit sorry that it is causing alot of discontent. Thought it would be a nice feature to add.

I agree that detailed bios would add to the game.
This idea is intended to be a quick overview, just a few lines in a tool-tip or in the leaders detail box, to give some background info on the officer.

It was not intended to be a separate detailed bio page or screen.
This project isn't stopping anyone from doing a more detailed bio presentation.

Ageod is a small team, there is no way they can do 300 detailed bio's.
I'm sure they would be more than happy for someone else to roll up their sleeves, dig into the resources and write something up.
Heck all it would take is to copy&paste from Wikipedia.

Maybe another group can start working on the longer bios while we work on the tool-tips.
That would be a perfect solution, the player can get a quick summary from the tool-tips and more detailed info from a separate screen.
Maybe the art department can create a beautiful page, somehow connected to the ledger, that we can use for detailed bios.
Might be something that Ageod can think about.

-Sunray, can you move your new tool-tip bios to a separate thread. Maybe titled "CSA tool-tip bios"?

Suggestions?

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Korrigan
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Mon Apr 30, 2007 6:17 pm

TC237, do not be sorry. You made a suggestion and you're ready to work on it. Those who work are those who decide.

Do no worry about Sunray's workload. He was already working on the bio project when you made you pre-war bio suggestion.

If some people want to work wiht Sunray on war biographies, I can create 2 sub-categories in this forum without pb if you like. These two workshops would be complementary.

This way everybody will be happy. :innocent:
"Never argue with a fool, onlookers may not be able to tell the difference." Mark Twain



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Pocus
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Mon Apr 30, 2007 7:43 pm

the final format will have to be one entry per Excell cell, with no carriage returns but § instead.
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Hofstadter's Law: "It always takes longer than you expect, even when you take into account Hofstadter's law."

tc237
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Mon Apr 30, 2007 7:54 pm

When possible can you email me the files so that I maybe able to test it?

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arsan
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Mon Apr 30, 2007 9:23 pm

Hi again!

First, i hope my other post didn´t sounded rude or like i was trying to trash the effort tc237 is volunteering to do.
It was not my intention. :innocent:
As you could see, English is not my first language and it can lead to misinterpretations.
Please, bear with me :cwboy:

tc237
I think that your "pre war" style bios would be a great "mod" or standard feature for the game.
But i am worried because i understood (reading the post of several Ageod members) that it´s thought that it would be right to substitute the historical bios Sunray is doing for a future patch with "your style" of bios.

I think it would be a shame for many players more or less new to the ACW. It´s true you have wiki, but in the middle of a game its not the most convenient way of looking for a little information about a leader.

Also, this game is going to (i hope!) be published in many non speaking countries and therefore played by non English speaking players.
Most of the ACW information on the web is on English so they wont be able to look wiki or google to understand why Butler for example is rated as such e a lousy leader.
This could create frustration in the players that could be avoided by a little bio information about that particular leader.
Outside of USA or other english speaking countries the ACW is not so widely known. And its not easy to get info.
Here in Spain you can hardly (if at all) find book about the ACW. Maybe some novels or some generic history of the USA with 20 pages about the ACW, but thats nearly all.

Sunray
I really appreciate your work! :coeurs:
Of course i don't ask for 300 complete bios. I think the examples you have posted are great. Thats just the kind of information i will ask for.

If both kind of bios could be made, as mods or game features it would be great. I would read and love both.
But, if (because of time and work hours constraints) you have to choose one, please, choose the original Sunray style.
IT would be much more usefully for many players, if only to "explain" and help to appreciate the ratings and abilities AGEOD have implemented on leaders.
If not, for many "casual" players they could seem illogical and frustrating.

Im sorry i can't help in the creation of bios: my English and my knowledge of the ACW are pretty bad.
But if you need any help to translate it to Spanish, count me in! :gardavou:

Thanks ! :hat:

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Wolfpack
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Just my 2 cents worth

Wed May 02, 2007 3:33 am

Here are my thoughts. . .

I really like the idea of concise pre-war bios for the leaders on tooltips. I feel like this a nice addition that few would disagree with if not for the idea that the time and effort should be spent on other matters (possibly more detailed ACW bio info :sourcil: ). However, if the time involved by AgeOd is minimal, as has been mentioned by Pocus, I think this is a good first step. The concise nature should pacify those that would rather see nothing at all, the info would be better than nothing for those that would like to see more, and the benefits could be reaped sooner than the alternative.

A separate effort could (and should) be made for including more detailed and more in-game ratings specific bios pertaining to historical ACW performance. These lengthier types of bios would not seem to lend themselves well to a tooltip type display however, due to their size. I do hope that this type of bio can be included in the future, in-game with ledger-type screens if possible, but I would even be happy if a separate utility or database were to be offered through the AgeOd community. However, this undertaking would be much more time-consuming, in volume of words, and no doubt in debate as well, and that is the main reason I would prefer to see the pre-war bios first.

I would also agree that any changes in this regard made by AgeOd should be made optional if not too much work. I would say default with bios, option to disable. Of course if the changes are incorporated as mods, then they are optional by default.

My thanks to AgeOd for a wonderful game, and any and all who are working to try to help make this game better.
"[color="Navy"]First at Bethel[/color], [color="Red"]Farthest at Gettysburg[/color], and [color="Gray"]Last at Appomattox[/color]"
:siffle: 'n Dixie!

[font="Georgia"][color="Red"]"That government is best which governs least."
Henry David Thoreau[/color][/font]

tc237
Colonel
Posts: 316
Joined: Sat Mar 04, 2006 10:37 pm
Location: Allegheny Arsenal

Thu May 03, 2007 3:19 am

Thanks guys!! :coeurs:

It's alot harder then I thought at first. Trying to summarize a persons life down to 4-7 lines. :bonk:

If you guys have time look through the bios and please offer any suggestions or corrections.

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