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Late July 1861 orders

Fri May 02, 2008 10:09 am

Since neither of my theater commanders replied to my working proposal for reinforcements, I've gone ahead with it as is.

Due to concerns over immediate public pressure to push into Virginia, I have determine to fully mobilize the nation immediately. In conjunction, I'm calling for an exceptional tax to pay for the war effort. I'm sure that morale will drop drastically, reducing the effectiveness of our troops for the rest of the campaign season. It is unavoidable; we need the manpower to fight an extended war. I don't expect the rebels to give up easily. Hopefully, just hearing of these measures will give the rebels pause, and we won't have to deal with a major offensive.

Reinforcements
3 regular regiments (1 Sailor, 2 Zouaves)
1 regiment of sharpshooters (PA)
93 regiments of volunteers (63 West, 16 East, 14 New England)
8 regiments of cavalry (Iowa, Illinois, Pennsylvania)
4 artillery batteries (Missouri, Illinois, Ohio, Delaware)
30 transport squadrons (17 Mid Atlantic, 13 New England)

I've closed all ports currently controlled by the insurgents, and ordered the navy to begin blockade operations.

I've also ordered some single ships and squadrons to patrol Chesapeake Bay and the Potomac River, cutting off those avenues of invasion, hopefully behind an adventurous raider or two. It's not that I expect the rebels to try anything here, but that I want to reduce the uncertainty that my commander has to face.

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Late July 1861 report

Wed May 07, 2008 4:23 pm

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The rebels have decided to ignore Kentucky's neutrality proclamation, and invaded as soon as they could gather the forces to do so. The sympathy of the people in that state has swung massively in our favor. Leonidas Polk captured Paducah with 5,000 men. Another 10,000 took Bowling Greene. There is also cavalry near Louisville.

Small groups of cavalry raiders have pushed across the Ohio River into Illinois and Indiana, attacking Salem, IL and New Albany, IN. Newly recruited militia held both those points. The public and governors of both those states are reacting accordingly.

Lyon, Blair, and Cai have diplomatically defused the situation in St. Louis. Missouri is still rather hostile, but I'm sure it could have been much worse.

General Cai has asked for reinforcements of cavalry, artillery, and ironclads.

In the east, a small brigade of rebels moved into the area around Fort Monroe. They were promptly dealt with by the forces there. We are not sure if they were attempting to survey siege lines or find transportation to the eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay. Secretary Welles' assignment of several squadrons to patrol the Chesapeake has mostly removed the threat of a move in the latter direction. Reinforcements will be rushed to Fort Monroe.

General Patterson delayed his move on Harper's Ferry long enough that Jackson could capture it with two brigades, while additional rebel cavalry siezed Frederick, MD. Patterson has accordingly been replaced by General Hooker. General Kurtz has suggested a two-pronged assault to trap Jackson while he is isolated. I was enthusiastic about the possibilities, but upon reviewing the map with General Scott, we discovered that Kurtz's plan would leave too many of our forces in dangerously exposed positions. It also reverses the doctrine of strategic offensive / tactical defensive. The location of Joe Johnston with the rest of the Shenandoah forces is unknown at this time.

We will continue with the slow-but-sure plan for Virginia. We will get the troops trained and organized, and try to get them some decent leadership. We will form our initial lines between Alexandria and Hagerstown, with additional defenses in depth behind those lines, then push forward from Leesburg towards Front Royal and New Market, isolating any rebel forces in the Shenandoah Valley. The rebels will be forced to try to break through our entrenchments to escape. We should be on the Rappahannock and in control of most of the valley by spring. In the meantime, raids near Covington, along with an amphibious landing to take Norfolk, should divert some of the rebel troops away from the front lines.

General Kurtz has asked for additional artillery.

General Scott is working on a plan to cut off rebels supplies into Virginia next year, by destroying infrastructure across large portions of the Carolinas. He calls it a "March to the Mountains". When he has his materials organized, I will present it to the CinCs. This will probably preclude the plan to reoccupy Florida, as it would use the same resources.

Indications are that public pressure for a short war has crested. Sensible people are starting to realize that this is no small effort. Now if we could only convince the newspaper editors ... Morale should improve over the next few months. In the meantime, we have formed a military commission to study the problems of desertion and straggling, and a sanitary commission, to reduce the effects of disease in our camps. We should be able to deal with these issues more effectively than the insurgents. Initial recommendations are that we should recruit more new regiments, and spend less resources trying to fill the vacancies in existing ones.

The British received news of our closing the southern ports well, and reaction to the cotton embargo was very negative. They may perceive that we are losing the war at the moment, but we currently have no worries about interference from that quarter.

My initial worries that half the troops we requested were not recruited - proved to be based on poor reporting procedures in the War Department, along with actual hostility between that department and some state administrations. The troops were recruited. If Cameron cannot organize his duties any better than this, I will have to replace him.
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Wed May 07, 2008 4:34 pm

Excuse me please. Who is this General Cai? T

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Wed May 07, 2008 4:39 pm

Major General Johnny Cai ... CinC West.
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Early August 1861 orders

Wed May 07, 2008 9:10 pm

I got some responses to my proposal from the CinCs. They want additional cavalry and artillery to deal with the immediate problems they face. I will apparently need to get General Kurtz some additional militia for defense in depth, but don't I have the manpower just yet (however, we are already starting to build a surplus of supplies). I've cut back on replacements, due to concerns over attrition - especially in regards to full strength regiments. I've also cut back on the number of steamboats ordered, to meet my CinCs concerns.

Reinforcements
2 regular regiments (1 Sailor, 1 Zouaves)
2 regiments of sharpshooters (1 east, 1 west)
9 regiments of cavalry (3 east, 6 west)
13 artillery batteries (8 east, 5 west)
2 regiments of engineers
2 ironclads (MO)
1 brig (Mid Atlantic)
3 transport squadrons (New England)

I've sent reinforcements (1st US & 3rd Artillery) to Fort Monroe with additional troops on the way. I unfortunately sent all the transports out of Boston Harbor two weeks ago, so those additional reinforcements are delayed by having to take rail cars to Atlantic City in order to rendezvous with transports for Monroe. Fortunately we have decent rail capacity.

The Chesapeake patrols are mostly in position. A little shuffling of assignments will put the steam frigates at the south end of the bay and Cape Charles, with the single brigs along the Potomac River, and the two-brig squadrons in between.

The New England Squadron, an accompanying transport, and four additional frigates (the last just departing New York) are on their way to the Atlantic Blockade.

The New York Squadron and a transport are on their way to the Gulf Blockade to rendezvous with the Brooklyn and the St Louis. They've just rounded Florida. Admiral Palmer is also headed in that direction with the two remaining frigates from the shipping lanes. This will leave us with no cruisers for anti-piracy protection. I'm trying to rush a law through Congress that will allow captains of merchant vessels flying the US flag to purchase obsolete 6lb, 12lb, & 24lb cannons left over from the War of 1812, the Seminole War, and the Mexican War - at discount prices. Unfortunately, our largest storehouse of these weapons was at Gosport, now the rebels have them. The sales of the remainder will be used to purchase additional naval forces with modern weaponry, and we will make a big noise about any that is designated for shipping escorts. That should be popular.

We will need to buy at least four additional blockade squadrons and some cruisers (frigates) in the next year, so that they can be in place when the "March to the Mountains" plan begins to have some effect. Gideon Welles suggested purchasing these blockade squadrons back in May, but it was judged that there was too much "short war" pressure at that time. We will also need brigs for the river blockades, and some armored frigates or additional steam frigates to post at the river mouths, which will keep ironclads out of Charleston or Savannah from interfering with the brigs.

Farragut has been ordered to the James River with the rest of the fleet (eight steam frigates and a transport ... including three steam frigates currently patrolling Hampton Roads and Cape Henry), where he will begin blockade operations against Richmond.

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Early August 1861 Report

Mon May 12, 2008 11:10 am

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The insurgents have fully mobilized, and instuted an exceptional tax, in response to our similar measures in July.

Lyon has taken Rolla, but not quickly enough to save the depot there from rebel arsonists. McBride's Brigade retreated to the Southwest - across the Big Piney River, and Campbell's cavalry is to the east, reportedly near Potosi.

General Joe Johnston has taken command of the rebels at Bowling Greene. Now that they are well organized, we expect aggressive action from this area.

With the exception of one minor attack in Ohio (at Portsmouth, west of Lawrence), enemy cavalry raids in both theaters appear to be temporarily on the decline. In the west, they have been fought to a standstill at Salem and Cairo, and were defeated west of Cincinatti (at Lawrenceburg, Indiana, where they retreated across the Ohio river). Hopefully we can destroy some of these raiders before they can retreat to safety. I will order additional gunboats for General Cai with this objective in mind for the future.

In the east, a strong force of rebels under General Bonham has moved into the area around Leesburg. Beauregard has organized his army into three corps along a northwest/southeast axis: Jackson at Harper's Ferry, Bonham at Leesburg, and Holmes at Manassas. Beauregard's headquarters is also at Manassas.

General Kurtz has our forces arrayed along a line between the rebels and Washington. Hooker's Division along the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal south of Frederick; McDowell with Tyler's Division along the canal between the Monocacy Aqueduct and the Chain Bridge, and Runyon and Miles' divisions west and southwest of Alexandria. We cannot advance until we get the Army better organized.

I worry about the weakness of Hooker's force. The area to the north is still relatively open, and Kurtz has been asked to address this. Bonham, Jackson, or both could attack anywhere along our line, and I don't believe we can hold against all the forces the rebels can concentrate, but we should be able to counter-attack.

Magruder has pulled back from Hampton Roads, leaving the 1st NC Brigade in trenches, supported by the 21st Virginia militia holding the town. Magruder is believed to be at Richmond, although he could be further north. Butler reports he has completed organization of the brigades at Fort Monroe.

Our fleet in the James has proven insufficient to blockade Richmond, and will need to be reinforced or reassigned.

McClernand has arrived at Chicago, but hasn't begun his duties there yet. Banks is taking a similar rest at Baltimore. Local commanders at Chicago and St Louis seem to have some trouble getting their forces organized efficiently. I've asked General Cai to address these issues.
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Late August 1861 Orders

Mon May 19, 2008 1:35 am

It appears that additional replacements will not be needed until we go on the offensive, or the enemy attacks in strength. We are a little behind where I'd like to be with transportation, if we are to react effectively to enemy movements and have additional resources ready for amphibous operations, while still forwarding supplies to the front. Now that the volunteers from July and August have been enlisted, and some additional artillery (and gunboats) provided to the commanders, I should be able to concentrate more on that area.

Reinforcements
1 regiment of Sailors
2 militia regiments (Maryland)
1 regiment of cavalry (Pennsylvania)
4 artillery batteries (MD & WV)
3 gunboats (Missouri)

The transports at Atlantic City proved to be unnecessary, as the troops there received other orders from General Kurtz. He issued orders for General Burnside to report to the army west of Washington. He also continues to push all troops directly to the front lines, ignoring requests for defense in depth. We will have to clarify the chain of command in these regards.

After reviewing enemy troop dispositions, I've reevaluated the need for the Chesapeake patrols.

The Pocahontas, Water Witch, and an additional brig have been ordered to join the USS Bainbridge (all brigs) in the Potomac River, to guard the crossings between Alexandria and Washington.

The USS Sumpter (brig) has been ordered to the Rappahanock River, to provide scouting reports on enemy movements near Fredericksburg.

The Pawnee, Cumberland, New London, and Perry (2 more steam frigates, 2 brigs) have been ordered to join the James River fleet; providing adequate hulls to effectively blockade Richmond.

The New England and New York blockade squadrons have arrived on station, and are awaiting the arrival of the additional frigates.

The USS Theodore and Barbarian, with the 2nd Naval brigade aboard (2nd Naval regiment, 3rd NY Zouaves regiment), have been ordered to the Lower Santee River, in South Carolina. This remote location should allow the troops to disembark into boats and launch a surprise attack upriver, destroying the depot at Camden.

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Late August 1861 Report

Wed Jun 04, 2008 3:33 am

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Brigadier General Porter has reported ready for duty at Louisville.

Brigadier General Meagher has reported in ready for duty along with his Irish Brigade, in New York. The Union Brigade has also been mustered in at that location.

The California Brigade has reported ready for duty in Philadelphia.

Significant numbers of additional cavalry, artillery, and transports have also reported in across the country, and significant infantry forces have reported in at St Louis; Lexington, MO; Indianapolis; and in southern Ohio.

The Confederate raiders that were in Illinois all escaped west across the Mississippi River into Missouri. (One full regiment at Hillsboro, two depleted regiments near Greenville)

McBride's Brigade in Missouri evaded our patrols, and joined General Price's force at Springfield.

The rebel Ohio River Fleet (seven ships) has arrived at the Great Confluent, in a position to support the defenses of Forts Henry and Donelson. Our patrol in the area retreated rather than face those numbers. The rebel Mississippi River Fleet (5 ships) is stationed in Reelfoot Lake, protecting the fortifications at Columbus, KY and Island No. 10.

We won a small cavalry skirmish at Gallia, OH on the north bank of the Ohio River, causing about 400 casualties to the raiders.

Rebel General Kirby Smith assaulted Grafton with a small division, driving off our defenders and destroying the batteries. It was very perceptive of the rebels to strike here, as I expect we will have some difficulty coordinating a counter-attack. This also may significantly delay our plans for taking Covington.

Our cavalry regiment at Harpers Ferry escaped across the Potomac to Hagerstown, but without doing significant damage to the rail lines. They were met by an additional cavalry regiment moving forward from Pennsylvania, extending our line, somewhat protecting Hooker's right flank, and in a position to move around Jackson's left flank and destroy rail in Bearegard's rear.

Beauregard created a large new corps for his army, under the command of Theophilus Holmes, stationed around Aquia Landing (south of Alexandria). The weak points of the rebel line are at Manassas and Harpers Ferry, the strong points at Aquia and Leesburg. Our weakest point remains the western flank near Frederick.

Our raiders in southern Virginia are on the run from four enemy cavalry regiments that have moved in to position on their flanks.

Our additional frigates arrived on station in the Atlantic and the Gulf, and will be joined administratively with the blockade squadrons, bringing those squadrons to full strength.

Farragut reports that his fleet has effectively blockaded Richmond and City Point.

The amphibious raider brigade destined for South Carolina, has not arrived in position for a landing yet, as we had hoped.

The rebels appear to be consolidating their defensive positions in Virginia, Kentucky, and Missouri; prior to any additional offensives. I don't think they perceive the full extent our leadership problems, yet.
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Early September 1861 Orders

Thu Jun 05, 2008 4:27 am

I'm still trying to get corps commanders for the eastern theater Army ... even totally incompetent ones are better than none. Butler is on his way to Washington, arriving in early October, then onward to Frederick ... the doctors say Scott should be able to hold on for about another month after that. General Kurtz should be able to replace Butler with someone more competent in January, at which time he [Butler] can return to Washington to take over the outer defenses. McClellan is headed to Alexandria. I expect that as soon as the rebs see that McClellan and Butler are our only available corps commanders, they will attack. My assessment is they would be better off doing it before then. I still expect that they will probably do so successfully even if we are totally on the defensive, but I'd like to have at least the slim possibility of mutual support when the time comes, and some prepared positions to fall back on.

I'd would really like to see our cavalry moving out in the east (while the weather allows rapid movement) to break up the rail network that enables the rebel army to hold semi-permanent positions so far forward, and possibly draw some troops off the front line; but the cavalry are merely moving up to hold defensive positions on the flanks of the army, instead of volunteer brigades, which we could afford to use (and lose) there. The cavalry will be performing these duties in full view of any enemy scouting parties sent out by Jackson and Holmes. At least Kurtz gave Scott control of a few volunteers to get some fall-back/railroad security positions in southern PA started.

The "amphibious" volunteers have been rerouted to Fort Monroe once again. They will be joined there by the Irish Brigade and the California Brigade, under the overall command of General Mansfield. The Irish Brigade will be accompanied by extra transports, although the use of so many blue-water transport ships will almost certainly negate any chance of achieving surprise at Suffolk or Norfolk. Hopefully, General Kurtz will be amenable to the idea of rerouting or partially rerouting the attack through Edenton or Garys. Columbia and Hampton Roads would also make nice secondary objectives.

We have some cooperation between the CinCs to retake Grafton; hopefully it will start some communication between them. Maybe they will share complaints about the Administration. That's fine, if they start talking. The planned movement into the Grafton area is extremely clumsy. The first troops in are trying to rendezvous with the last to arrive; the original Grafton garrison, which is far too weak for the task, is attempting to cut off the enemy line of retreat while bringing some supply wagons along and risking their capture. None of these troops have any orders beyond moving into the local area and defending themselves. I don't expect good results (especially if the rebels cut the rail lines), but we can afford to lose that one, much more than we can afford my making an additional fuss about it (just like the assault on Norfolk). There are plenty of additional reinforcements that will soon be available for a follow up assault on Grafton. I'm trying to encourage the CinCs to discuss (or dismiss) a possible realignment of the theater border as well.

The cavalry regiment that is raiding has been rerouted so that they have some chance of picking up supplies and surviving. If we are very lucky, they will also be able to destroy the enemy depot at Lexington, NC, greatly simplifying the operational issues we will have to deal with next summer. Scott wanted to mention two weeks ago that remaining so close to their original objective was not the best possible plan, but I asked him not to say anything about that, as I felt he had made enough criticisms at that time, and that was the only cavalry unit acting aggressively in the theater.

The bulk of the Potomac Fleet (brigs) is moving to take up positions near Fredericksburg. Hopefully they will be able to interdict some supplies from crossing the Rappahanock, and force enemy troops to take a slightly longer way around, without using the railroad.

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Troops in Kentucky are starting (cautiously) to move into positions to liberate the eastern part of the state. The gunboat squadron at Lawrence, OH remains idle, rather than cutting off a riverine escape down the Ohio River for the raiders nearby. I seriously considered issuing direct orders, but decided that it's not worth the long-term price. Gideon did give control of it to General Cai, and has not asked to have it back.

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Some cavalry in Missouri is headed generally in the right direction, although we are losing the opportunity to attack the raiders there before they can completely escape and reinforce. I'm sure the enemy scouts are providing Polk and Price with full reports of our activities in St Louis.

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Most of our merchant marine is headed out to sea. I've sent one transport squadron to Ocean, NJ to provide transportation for the artillery batteries there, and another towards Fort Zachary in the Florida Keys, just to have an extra in the Gulf.

The 2nd amphibious brigade is still moving towards its hopefully hidden drop off point in the Santee River. I've ordered additional empty transports to show the flag at points near Savannah and Wilmington, hoping to either create a diversion, or a longer-term sense of security amongst the rebels about amphibious feints and lack of northern competence.

I'm issuing a very specific policy in regards to any troops designated for amphibious use. Gideon and Gus Fox will be personally going over planned landings in the Carolinas with the naval commanders when General Scott's strategic plan goes into effect, ensuring that landings are aggressive, deep, timely, and simultaneously hit all undefended or lightly defended targets. After that happens, troops will be turned over to the theater commander. The same policy will apply on the Gulf Coast, if we ever manage to get there.

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I overdid replacements last month, considering we don't dare attack in the east, and Beauregard doesn't seem inclined to attack yet either. We are running a surplus, and almost all regiments are at full strength.

Banks is on his way to New York to bring in more manpower (more important, although less urgent than corps command - I'm trying to strike a balance, while sticking with the overall plan). Burnside is headed to Washington. I understand General Kurtz wanting to use him in the field, considering he was on our "secret" list of preferred commanders, but Scott had to take the decision completely out of his hands. Theater commanders have to release specific troops to centralized control or to each other, rather than be in charge of entire geographical areas, or there is no chance we will ever get significant long range amphibious assaults organized, competent field leaders in the eastern theater, or enough division commanders into the western theater. Burnside is competent defensively (making him a good choice in the event that Washington gets assaulted ... and may provide a very slight deterrent to an assault), and he can raise additional troops in the meantime.

We have some artillery and gunboats, and will be able to buy considerably more once the bulk of our transports get to sea (along with bringing our transportation network back up to full strength). I'm hoping to hold off calling for volunteers until December, and then use every financial tool and incentive available to call for the most possible. If the rebels attack before then, I will probably have to put out the call in response.

Checking the latest editorials, morale on the home front appears to be continuing its slight upward trend. I suppose the people are happy that their husbands, sons, and brothers aren't getting killed off in large numbers, and that the rebels haven't chased us out of Washington yet.

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Reinforcements
1 regiment of Sharpshooters (Ohio)
3 regiments of Cavalry (Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania)
1 Light Artillery battery (West Virginia)
3 batteries of Napoleons (New Jersey)
3 gunboat squadrons (Missouri)

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Economic Development
20 Steamboats
Medium investment in New Mexico (we desperately need to get some serious food production going there by the time the rest of the west coast troops arrive)

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additional image (early September reinforcements) to follow soon
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Early September 1861 Report

Mon Jun 09, 2008 12:34 am

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General News
As a result of General Scott's failing health and sometimes erratic behavior, Secretary Cameron has publicly appointed General McClellan as General-in-Chief of the Union armies. McClellan has sent word that he intends to make his headquarters in the field, acting as a temporary corps commander in McDowell's Army. I do not understand how he intends to act as both superior and subordinate to Generals Kurtz and McDowell. This is a situation that will need to be addressed, preferably without upsetting the theater CinCs I personally appointed. General Scott will be retained in an advisory position, and as commander of the Washington Defenses, for as long as his health allows.

General Burnside has arrived in Washington, where his services are expected to allow us to raise an extra 12 companies each month. He has also taken command of the Capitol Defense Force (militia and 32 lb. batteries, holding substantial fortifications at various points within the city). General Banks has arrived in New York and taken command of the defenses there. His recruiting activities should enable us to raise an extra company every two days. The combined efforts of Banks, McClernand, and Burnside will provide us with a new regiment every week.

Many new regiments have reported ready for duty, with the largest concentration at Cincinnati.


Hampton Roads and points south
Gideon was doing a little shuffling of his transports at Fort Monroe, in order to create diversions along the coast, not realizing the confusion it would cause dure to the crowded situation inside the fort. As a result, General Mansfield, the "amphibious" volunteers, and the California Brigade are all as far from Fort Monroe as they were two weeks ago. General Meagher has arrived with his Irish Brigade.

One of Major Palmer's couriers has made his way back to our lines with word that the the US Cavalry regiment was able to evade enemy cavalry forces in Virginia by continuing south into North Carolina. Both Hillsboro and Lexington are held by enemy garrisons and there is additional artillery deployed near Salisbury. The raiders are running very short of supplies, and will need to continue south to obtain more.

The amphibious transports have arrived in the Santee River, but the troops are not in good shape to face organized opposition after the long voyage. Hopefully Camden has no garrison.

Diversionary/scouting transports have arrived near Wilmington and Savannah. Both places have substantial garrisons. Wilmington has at least five regiments, three in fortifications outside the city. The situation at Savannah is almost the same. The fortifications outside the city do not appear as well developed, but the garrison (minimum of five regiments) may be more substantial.


Vicinity of Washington
General Holmes has fallen back to Fredericksburg, leaving a single artillery battery at Aquia Landing. Our brigs have all arrived in the Rappahanock.

General Keyes has joined the army west of Washington, and is expected to form a new division (made up mostly of volunteers, but the rebels are not expected to comprehend that fact immediately).

9/2/61 General Hooker reports he repulsed an enemy probe of his lines near Frederick with minimal losses. Estimated enemy strength was 2 cavalry regiments.


The Valley and WV Panhandle
9/13/61 The miracle at Grafton!
General Smith did not anticipate a counter-attack. He did anticipate cavalry reinforcements, and was entirely negligent or overconfident in not damaging rail lines. He did not have scouts or videttes sent out from his lines. General Cai was able to successfully direct troops into good positions with very little opposition. Colonel Lewis' 1st Michigan Brigade took possession of the B & O railroad bridge on the west side of town on the 8th, remaining in a hidden poisition without enemy interference for five days. According to Colonel Lewis, "General Cai did not issue orders regarding the tactical situation, but he did give me some very good advice." On the 13th, Colonel Ness' 1st WV Brigade secured the train station with help from some local citizens. General Wallace's 6th division was able to rail directly into town, recapture the depot intact, and set up a defensive perimeter. General Smith, realizing that he was outnumbered better than 2-1, retreated towards Phillipi. The 4th NC cavalry regiment arrived, discovered the situation, and circled around to the north of town to await developments. The second regiment of enemy cavalry to arrive, apparently thinking that General Smith still held Grafton, rode directly into Wallace's lines, and was annihilated by the 2nd WV and 5th IN Volunteers regiments. On the 14th, the 10th OH Cavalry arrived and had a small skirmish with the 4th NC. Our total casualties from the operation amounted to only 250 troops, mostly from the 10th OH Cav. and 5th IN Vol. regiments. General Wallace, when asked about the strategy he used, shrugged and stated, "We arrived, deployed, and let the enemy make several blunders. Colonel Lewis' seizure of the railroad bridge was the key to the battle." The WV 2nd Brigade (the original Grafton garrison), escorting the WV supply train through Beverly, have not been attacked, and are returning to Grafton as quickly as their battered state allows.

Hopefully, General Kurtz will be able to push some scouting forces into the Shenandoah Valley soon. We can tell that enemy formations have been moving back and forth west of Winchester, but really have no idea what or exactly where they are. We keep guessing, but I think we are guessing wrong more often than not. I should ask Pinkerton to keep detailed notes on what rumors we hear, and where exactly they come from.

WV and Eastern Kentucky
Enemy raiders in southern Ohio evaded our forces there. They attacked Marietta, before possibly proceeding on to Grafton. This was likely the mysterious "second regiment" at Grafton. These continued aggressive probes (mostly unsuccessful) by the enemy are allowing us to raise extra "local defense" units across the country, the latest being in West Virginia.

A combined force of regulars and volunteer "light" troops (2nd OH Brigade, 2nd OH Volunteers), has taken possession of Prestonburg, which was undefended.

Three cavalry regiments from Ohio have arrived at Clarksburg, KY, and are besieging the militia garrison there.

General Johnston has advanced to Brandenburg, on the Ohio River west of Louisville. Generals Porter and Hunter are desperately trying to organize a defense with militia and volunteers, and have called for additional regular troops. Bowling Greene appears lightly held by two enemy cavalry regiments.


Western Kentucky and the Mississippi
Commodore Foote has arrived with eight gunboats at Cape Girardeau. It is not expected that he will be able to hold on there in the face of a concerted enemy attack. Once the command situation at the St Louis shipyards is sorted out, we expect that several more gunboats and ironclads will become available within the next ten days.


The Far West
The MO Cavalry Brigade has arrived at Jacksonport, on the White River.

The 2nd and 3rd US Cavalry have arrived at Fort Gibson, and seized it from the rebel's Indian allies, who were using it as a rallying point. Additional cavalry (2nd and 3rd IA) have arrived at Leavenworth, and are expected to help meet this new threat.
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Late September 1861 Orders

Mon Jun 09, 2008 3:29 am

The raiders in North Carolina have been given orders to proceed to Florence, SC; so I have ordered some transports to the Pee Dee River that had originally been intended for the Gulf Coast, in case a rapid extraction is called for. Since the raiders aren't headed to Camden, and I expect it to be defended, the 2nd Sailors Brigade has been given the objective of attacking Branchville and breaking up rail lines there. Branchville is not expected to be garrisoned, it lies outside the scope of next year's operations, but cutting the railroad there would support those operations. It may help convince the enemy that my objective is Charleston. The transports will simultaneously move to the Middle Santee River to scout Camden, and to show themselves to any garrisons in the area. This is deliberately clumsy. We want to maintain any possible confusion about how and whether amphibious landings can be concealed.

The diversionary transports off Savannah have been given orders to proceed to Fort Pickens, in place of the ones now headed up the Pee Dee. The transports off Wilmington will move to the James Estuary, in support of the Monitor and the scouting squadron from New York, which have been assigned to take a hard look at the Suffolk defenses.

The USS Water Witch (Potomac River) is headed into Washington DC for a quick refit. Other transports continue towards their foreign destinations. Three transport squadrons are being held in New England for the possibility that some additional amphibious troops will be made available.

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McClellan has been rerouted to Frederick. Butler continues on towards Washington.

Cavalry has started to move forward in Virginia, with one regiment headed to Rockbridge (Valley Railroad), and another to Aquia (Stafford).

Three additional cavalry regiments from Port Tobacco are moving as a unit towards Hanover Junction. They are expected to arrive there about the 25th of October. They will take Warsaw harbor along the way, rather than taking the Chesapeake route, and Holmes should get a good look at them in the Rappahannock. That may confuse him as to their true objective. Brigs will stay on station in the Rappahanock to provide a rescue if it is needed.

General Mansfield, the California Brigade, some additional artillery from New Jersey, and a sailor's regiment from Philadelphia are all headed to Fort Monroe. We will get there eventually. We might even be able to launch some sort of attack just as our cavalry take out some railroads. The James City batteries continue to worry me.

The 1st VT, 1st MA, 2nd ME, 2nd DE, and 13th Vol. (MD), are all being split off from the main army, and sent to hold trenches behind the main line. They are not being dispersed as widely as I would have done myself, but they will allow some larger brigades and cavalry to be used in their proper functions. The rest of the the "amphibious", Maryland, and Deleware volunteers are being formed into a division under General Keyes.

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Wallace's 6th Division is headed back to Cincinnati, leaving behind the 1st Michigan and 10th Ohio Cav. No further communication between the CinCs.

Some additional troops are being shuffled to more appropriate assignments along the banks of the Ohio River. Five brigades of infantry are boarding steamships at Cincinnati for the short trip down to Louisville (5 inf rgts, 5 vol rgts, 4 light rgts, 1 cav). Additional artillery will be needed at Louisville, but none is readily available.

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The 9th IN Militia has been ordered to complete rail repairs in Boone, and then push forward towards Lexington. The 7th IN Militia continues to hold its position in Mercer, protecting the harbor there. The 1st IN Militia will steam up the Green and Barren Rivers from Evansville, to break up the rail between Bowling Greene and Glasgow. If Johnston does attack Louisville, we should be able to counter-punch and destroy him before he can return to safety. This will also slow other troops being sent to him. We are pushing additional troops, especially cavalry, forward to Evansville from various points.

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Commodore Foote is returning to Saint Louis with three gunboat squadrons, the fourth is headed into Cairo. They should all have moved to Saint Louis together, but this is too small an issue to fret about.

The Missouri Cavalry Brigade will attack Madison, AR; which is held by the 1st AR "Yell Rifles" Militia. I would prefer that they move downsteam to Bolivar, but at least they are taking the initiative. If Madison is not reinforced, and the cavalry take it, that is one less enemy depot to hunt down later, and they still threaten most of what they could threaten from Bolivar.

Lyon's 3rd Division, along with their supplies, will return by rail to St Louis, leaving behind the 2nd MO Bde at Rolla. Maybe I should have Scott say something about moving entire supply trains by rail. Then again, maybe not. Enemy raiders have recrossed the Missippi at Charleston, and are regrouping near Columbus. The 6th IL Militia (Chester) will amphibiously attack Charleston.

The 11th IL Cav will push forward to Erie, MO, from which point they will scout Price's Division at Springfield. I just noticed that almost all of Missouri now favors the Union cause. We won't have to garrison the entire state, the people there will eventually do it for us.

The 2nd and 3rd US Cavalry will hold Fort Gibson, while the 2nd and 3rd IA Cavalry intercept Stand Watie.

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Reinforcements
1 Militia (PA)
1 Cavalry (PA)
1 Army HQ
1 Ironclad (MO)

Replacements
3 Infantry

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Economic Development
10 Locomotives
15 Steamboats
Medium investment in New Mexico

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Late September 1861 report

Fri Aug 01, 2008 4:16 am

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General News
Enlistment is up. Independent companies have been formed throughout the nation. They will be incorporated into existing regiments as needed. Also, Gideon has begun a program of enlisting contrabands in the navy. Additional brigades have been formed of recruits from the fire departments of New York City and Cincinnati.


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Hampton Roads and points south
All the designated troops except the 2nd NJ Vol Bde have finally arrived at Fortress Monroe. We now have 19,000 men ready to move forward from that point, led by General Meagher.

The rebel 3rd Reserve Bde and 10th NC Cav Rgt arrived in Florence prior to our cavalry raiders. Major Palmer wisely did not proceed beyond Darlington. They will draw supplies from that point before reboarding transports. The 2nd Naval Bde siezed Branchville with no opposition. Camden was undefended. It is not expected to remain that way.


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Vicinity of Washington
The 1st Maryland Cavalry made a daring strike on Aquia Landing, capturing the enemy battery at a cost of 200 men. Raiding cavalry is in the Rappahanock, but somewhat worn out from the effort of trying to maintain a brigade formation on the march and with disembarking and re-embarking crossing the Rappahanock Peninsula. One regiment, the 2nd Maryland, will have to fall back for rest and resupply.

General Keyes organized the 7th Division under McDowell, McClellan has arrived in Frederick (along with additional light artillery), and Butler is making a quick round of the Washington Defenses before being sent to the front.

No other action has been reported in the area.


The Valley and WV Panhandle
Raiders have arrived at Rockbridge, VA.

9/17/61 The WV/2nd Bde (and WV supply train) skirmished with Kirby Smith & Bushrod Johnson (4 rgts inf, 1 lt btty), who were retreating from Grafton. We took 300 casualties, the enemy 200. Our force retreated west to Rich Mountain pass. Smith continued on to Covington.

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WV and Eastern Kentucky
9/24/61 Rebel militia at Clarksburg surrendered when faced with the imminent threat of an assault. This has been construed as an "invasion" in some Kentucky newspapers, even though the rebels previously attacked Bowling Greene and Paducah.

Wallace has returned to Cincinnati with the 6th Division.

The 9th IN Militia advanced to Lexington, but were unable to engage enemy cavalry.

General Grant has arrived in Louisville, and is expected to take command of the Kentucky Department.

Joe Johnston retreated to Glasgow, while the 1st IN Mil took possession of Brownsville.

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Western Kentucky and the Mississippi
General Polk has organized a substantial force (9,000?) at Humboldt, TN. It is more than half cavalry, with substantial artillery support.

9/18/61 Col. Cleburne's Yell Rifles managed to escape from Madison, AR before our cavalry could completely surround the town. General Van Dorn with the 10th AR Cav has taken a position across the White River near Itta.

The 6th IL took Charleston with no opposition.

Foote and Lyons have arrived in St Louis. Foote has 2 ironclads, 12 gunboats, and 8 transports available. Lyon should be able to substantially reinforce the 3rd Division from Halleck's forces.

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The Far West
Price has substantial (12,000?) forces at Springfield, with another 3,000 at Fayetteville. Forces at Fort Smith are unknown. We can either directly confront Price with the 3rd Division, or try to cut his supply line.

Watie has fallen back to Cherokees. We have 4 cavalry regiments at Ft Gibson, and several options.

Sumner has accumulated 6,500 troops (so far) in New Mexico. They are consuming about 1 ton of supplies a day. They have supplies for a month, with 10 tons to spare. New Mexico can produce 12 tons a month. We need to increase production, or move out soon.
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Early October 1861 Orders

Mon Aug 04, 2008 12:34 am

The US Cavalry regiment will take to boats, and rendezvous with the Belliqueux and Intrepid in the Lower Lumber River. The 2nd Sailors will move down the Santee River in boats, so that they can break up the rail at St Stephen. The Theodore and Barbarian will remain at their current position in the Santee to observe enemy movements.

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The 10 transports most in need of refits have been ordered back to New York and Boston. That leaves 54 transports at sea. Two transports from Boston are putting to sea, and another two are headed to Ocean, NJ, where they will pick up the 5th NJ battery.

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Water Witch and brigs from the James Estuary have been ordered to rendezvous with the Chesapeake Squadron in the Rappahannock River.

The Bainbridge and Sumpter will bring the 2nd MD Cav to Fort Monroe.

The Narraganset and Mohican have been dispatched to Albemarle Sound, carrying General Mansfield and the 1st US Regiment.

The Irish Bde, 4th Naval Regiment, B Artillery, and B Supply will perform an amphibious assault on Suffolk VA. They will be preceded by the NJ Volunteer Bde, which will secure the area around the town.

General Meagher has formed the 9th Division with the remaining expeditionary troops, and will assault James City.

The 4th PA is moving to Louisa, where they will destroy rail around Hanover Juction. The 2nd PA will stop at Hanover, and destroy rail between Richmond and West Point.

The US Cavalry regiment in Virginia will move cross-country to Hicksford, south of Petersburg. They should be able to resupply at Suffolk.

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Hooker abandoned his trenches at Frederick to meet with McClellan.

Scott, with Butler's assistance, has formed a corps around Washington.

Butler has also formed his own corps, and is moving to Alexandria to take over from General Runyon.

The 1st MD 'Union' and their captured artillery, are moving up the Potomac to Alexandria.

The 1st MD 'Potomac' and 3rd PA are moving around Jackson to raid the Manassas Gap Railroad in the Shenandoah Valley.

Additional reinforcements are moving forward (slowly). Some will reach the front lines. Others will not.

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The 1st Michigan is returning to Cincinnati.

The 1st, 2nd, & 3rd PA Bdes, along with the 1st WV and WV Battery B, have all been ordered to Millboro. The 1st and 3rd PA have additional orders to proceed east ? beyond that point, but I expect that will be changed. Supplies from Chambersburg have been ordered to Beverly. The WV/2nd and their supplies are returning to Grafton.

The 10th and 11th WV Cav will assault Christianburg.

The 2nd Ohio Vol Bde is proceeding into the mountains to assault Marion and starve there.

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The 15th OH Mil moves up from Ashland to Clarksburg.

Forces at Clarksburg will join Grant at Lexington.

The 4th OH Cav from Cleveland moves to Boone, KY.

The OH Gunboat Sq head for the Kentucky Confluent, to help keep rebels at Lexington out of the Ohio River.

The Michigan Bde and half of the 1st IN Vols move from Cincinnati to St Louis.

The 6th Division moves to Evansville, to act as a reserve for operations in Western Kentucky.

Grant takes the 1st OH Bde, 1st OH Vols, and the other half of the 1st IN Vols to assault Lexington. The 7th In Mil (Mercer) will join the 9th IN Mil in Fayette to act as a security force.

Porter and Hunter's 8th Division are moving up to Meade.

The 1st IN Mil retreats down the Green River to Henderson, where they will join the IL Vol Bde and 1st IL Btty C.

The 4th, 5th, and 6th IL Cav will attack Clarksville.

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Foote is bringing all available naval forces, along with the 1st MO Supply to drive the southern river fleet out of the Grand Confluent; while the IL Gunboat Squadron (Cairo) hold Cape Girardeau.

Lyon's 3rd Division, with his supply train, will land near Dover.

The West Bde, 4th WI Mil, and 3rd IL Cav will land at Paducah.

The 10th IL Mil and 1st IL Btty A will cross from Cairo to fortify Charleston, MO.

The MO Cavalry Bde has been ordered to fall back to Poplar Bluff.

The 10th IL Cav (Salem) will move up to Hillsboro, MO.

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The four cavalry regiments at Ft Gibson are moving as a single unit to attack Ft Smith.

The 7th, 10th, and 11th US regiments have been ordered to Dallas.

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Reinforcements
1 Marines
2 Cavalry (WI, NY)
4 12 lb Artillery (3 IL, 1 MI)
1 Ironclad (MO)

Replacements
1 Army HQ

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Economic Development
30 Locomotives
5 Steamboats
Medium investment in New Mexico

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Early October 1861 report

Mon Sep 08, 2008 9:25 am

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General Notes:

Artillery ordered in New Jersey (3 12lb batteries) have been completed, and will be rushed to the front. A transport squadron has been ordered to Ocean, NJ - in order to expedite movement from there. Additional gunboats were completed in Missouri.

[ATTACH]4036[/ATTACH]

Carolinas:

The US Cavalry got out of Darlington. They've sailed down the PeeDee, and rendezvoused with transports in the Lower Lumber River. Branchville and Darlington have been recaptured by the rebels. The 2nd Naval has arrived safely in St Stephen, where they will destroy additional rail before departing the area.

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Hampton Area:

General Mansfield has discovered some unexpected opposition in Albemarle Sound - Frank Buchanan with the CSS Virginia and VA Gunboats. We had expected that either they would be used to defend the James, or had left the area entirely.

The 1st NC Bde retreated from their entrenchments at James City, rather than face Meagher's 9th Division.

The 66th detachment (4th Naval, Irish Bde, B Arty, B Supply) has arrived in Suffolk, and trapped what appears to be two militia regiments inside the town.

The 2nd and 4th PA Cavalry both ran into the 4th & 5th GA Cavalry and 1st NC Rowan Artillery in Hanover. The 4th, although badly mauled, pushed through to Louisa. The 2nd fought a series of inconclusive engagements over the course of five days, and should still be able complete their mission and escape.

Potomac:

All quiet along the front lines. Just some reinforcements and raiding.

Butler has taken over command of the 4th and 5th Divisions at Alexandria. The 1st PA Bde (Hagerstown) has been reinforced with an additional 6lb battery from Wilmington, DE. The 1st Pioneers joined McClellan's Corps.

Our cavalry has also moved around the western flank of Beauregard's Army. The 3rd PA and 1st MD 'Potomac' are in Shenandoah and Warren.

Shenandoah Valley:

Several brigades (1st WV, 1st, 2nd, & 3rd PA, WV Btty B) have arrived at Millboro.

Christianburg and Marion were both reinforced, and our forces were split between the objectives. We were repulsed at both locations. Fortunately, losses were minimal.

[ATTACH]4041[/ATTACH]

Kentucky:

Avery's Cavalry departed Lexington prior to the arrival of Grant's force. Intelligence sources indicate that they probably moved straight south, in the direction of Huntsville, TN. Grant easily captured the single militia regiment left behind.

FJ Porter, with Hunter's 8th Division (12,000 - but only one artillery battery), has moved up to Meade, along the Nashville rail line.

Lew Wallace has brought the 6th Division over to Evansville, from where they can move to support a strike at either Bowling Greene or Dover (Donelson). In the meantime, 4 brigades of Infantry supported by artillery have occupied Henderson. Three cavalry regiments captured Clarksville. Opposition there was lighter than expected, only a single infantry regiment.

Lyons 3rd Division was unable to force their way through rebel gunboats to Dover, and has joined the mixed force which Fremont sent to Paducah instead. (Newly promoted Admiral) Foote was eventually able to drive the enemy gunboats from the Great Confluent, but couldn't bring on a decisive engagement, or determine where they retreated.

All major rebel forces in this area remained in place, with no serious reinforcement.

Joe Johnston - Barren: ~16,000
Sidney Johnston - Bowling Green: 4,000
Floyd - Dover: 6,000 (mostly outside, but serious entrenchments)
Zollicoffer - Nashville: 4,000 (mostly not ready for combat)
Polk - Humboldt: ~12,000

Our forces:

Grant - Lexington: 16,000
Louisville: 9,000 (over half not ready for combat)
Porter, Hunter - Meade: 12,000
Wallace - Evansville: 12,500 (8,000 ready for combat)
Henderson: 5,000
Clarksville: 3,000 Cavalry
Lyon - Paducah: 18,000
Fremont - Cairo: 3,000

[ATTACH]4039[/ATTACH]

West:

The MO Cav Bde has burned the depot at Madison, and retreated to Jacksonport.

2,000 additional reinforcements from Fayetteville (SS, Cav, Arty) moved up to join Price at Springfield.

Ft Smith was defended by a regular regiment inside, and a cavalry regiment outside. We drove off the cavalry, and the infantry surrendered. We lost 500 cavalry.
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Late October 1861 Orders

Tue Sep 09, 2008 10:55 am

Amphibious:
US Cavalry (USS Belliquex, USS Intrepid) will move to Fort Zachary. 2nd Naval will rendezvous with transports (USS Theodore, USS Barbarian) in the Lower Lumber.

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Norfolk Area:

Mansfield (USS Narraganset, USS Mohican) will attempt to move to the Meherrin River. US Cavalry (Sussex) will raid to the south of Garys at Warren, NC. 66th detachment, redesignated as 51st detachment, will assault Suffolk. Meagher's 9th Division will pass through New Kent into Hanover, leaving Keyes Brigade behind at James City. The 2nd & 4th PA Cavalry will each attempt to escape down the York River to Fort Monroe. The 12th MD Volunteers (King & Queen) will proceed to Hanover and attack the enemy cavalry there, while the 1st NY Brigade holds Tappahannock.

Norfolk Area Naval:

Farragut maintains the blockade of Richmond. Transport Squadron #6 (USS Long Island, USS Rocky) will split off from Dahlgren and the Monitor in the James Estuary, and join 10th Fleet (USS Pocahontas & 3 other brigs) in the Rappahannock. The 12th fleet transports (USS Mohawk, Huron, Oak, Resolution, Courageous, Almighty, Erie, Ontario) at Fort Monroe will also join 10th Fleet in the Rappahannock. The brig USS Water Witch (York Estuary) will stop at Fort Monroe for resupply. It can join the 7th Fleet (brigs USS Bainbridge & USS Sumpter) there.

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Potomac:

A massive raid at Fredericksburg, with a corresponding shift of forces to the left.

Butler's Corps, minus the 2nd Wisconsin Bde, will attack Fredericksburg, taking the long way around through the Wilderness. Joe Hooker's 2nd Division (Frederick) will rail to Alexandria and then march down to capture the town. The 3rd MD Dragoons (Washington) will amphibiously follow Butler's corps into Culpeper. The 3rd PA Cav (Shenandoah) will raid the Orange line near Lovington (Roanoke).

McDowell's army, minus Keyes 7th division, will move up to join the 2nd Wisconsin at Alexandria. The 2nd ME (Baltimore); Philadelphia Bde, Col. Amherst's 1st MD Bde, and Baltimore Btty (Annapolis); and 5th Supply (Adams, PA) will meet them there as well.

McClellan, with his supplies and pioneers, will take command of Keyes division, leaving the NVA 2nd Bde in Frederick. The Excelsior Bde (Caroll), and Col. Twain's 1st MD Bde (Adams, PA) will join this force. The 1st MA Volunteers and 5th PA Cav (also at Carroll) are also moving into the area seperately from the Excelsior Bde. Army Supply 1 (Chambers, MD) and 1st Supply (Franklin, PA) are moving here as well, and 1st MD 'Potomac' (Warren, VA) will return around Jackson's flank to protect Army Supply 1 on the move.

The NJ 3rd Btty & 4th Btty (Newark) are also moving to Fairfax and Montgomery, respectively. The NJ 5th Btty (Ocean) has orders to move to Stafford, but should stop in Fairfax. The 32nd transports (USS Halloween, USS Seagull) will proceed on to Fort Monroe without them.

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Shenandoah:

Upon discovering that Bushrod Johnson was dug in in force (~6,000 troops) at Covington, forces in Millboro began a long march back through the muddy mountains towards Grafton. They will be met there by the Old Brigade and WV Btty A. We really need a divisional commander for this area. The 2nd Ohio Volunteers, 10th & 11th WV Cav will all return to Prestonburg.


This will leave the following land forces in the East, before casualties:

Minor Garrisons
Chambers, MD: 2200 - 2 Inf, 2 Art (10 & 6)
Franklin, PA: 800 - Con
Cumberland, PA: 700 - Vol
Harrisburg, PA (inside): 700 - Vol
Dauphin, PA (outside Harrisburg): 700 - Mil
Adams, PA: 1700 - 1 Inf, 1 Con
York, PA: 1000 - Con
Lancaster, PA: 1500 - 2 Vol
Frederick, MD: 2100 - 1 Lt Inf, 2 Vol
Caroll, MD: 1400 - 2 Vol
Leonardtown, MD (inside): 700 - Vol
Port Tobacco, MD (inside): 1400 - Mil, Vol

Total: 14,000 (11,600 mobile)

Critical Garrisons
Baltimore, MD (inside): 2500
Baltimore, MD (outside): 700
Annapolis, MD (inside): 1200
Anne Arundel, MD (outside Annapolis): 2400
Washington, DC (inside): Burnside's Command (2300)
Prince George, MD (outside Washington): Scott's Corps (4700)
Alexandria, VA (inside): 3700

Total: 17,500 (2,700 mobile)

Northeastern VA Army
Fairfax (outside Alexandria): Northeastern Virginia Army [Tyler's 1st Div + assorted] (24,600)
Montgomery: McClellan's Corps [Keyes' 7th Div + assorted] (26,600)
Fredericksburg: Butler's Corps [Runyon's 4th Div, Miles' 5th Div] (27,000); Hooker's 2nd Div (8,600)

Total: 86,800

James (& York) River Forces
Hanover: Meagher's 9th Div + 1 regiment (8200)
Suffolk: 8900
Ft Monroe: 4800
Tappahannock: 2000
Meherrin River: 1200

Total: 25,100

Active Cavalry Raiders
Warren, NC: 1000
Roanoke, VA: 1000
Culpeper, VA: 1000

Total: 3000

Shenandoah & points west
Millboro: 6800
Beverly: 2000
Grafton: 11,400
Tazewell: 1700 Cavalry
Whyte: 2000

Total: 23,900

Grand Total East (mobile only): 152,100

The known opposition
Harper's Ferry: Jackson's Corps (~13000)
Loudon: Bonham's Corps (~16000)
Manassas: Beauregard's Army w/ Longstreet & Huger (~34000)
Fredericksburg: Holmes' Corps (~15000)
Richmond: Cooper & Lee's Commands (~17000)
Covington: Johnson's Command (~6000)
Williamsburg: ~8000 Mixed
Hanover: 300 Cavalry & Artillery
Culpeper: ~2000 Cavalry
Amherst: 2000 Cavalry
South Bank Garrisons (Petersburg, Suffolk, Norfolk, Garys): ~7500
Christianburg: 2000
Marion: 2500 Mixed
Carolina reserve: ~5000

Grand Total East (all known): ~130,300

I'm fairly satisfied with the minor garrisons at this point. I'll see if we can't trim and adjust them some when we have to resupply this winter (reduce forces at Adams, Lancaster, Port Tobacco), without fussing about it. Norfolk may or may not happen this year, and I'm ok with that either way, if it takes the pressure off Washington. Butler and Hooker should be able to do some serious damage at Fredericksburg - McD and McC should be able to hold Washington if it all comes apart. Cavalry are being used more effectively, to relieve pressure on our forces, and create pressure on the rebels. It should be time to loosen the reins on General Kurtz when Scott retires.


Ohio:

The 2nd Pioneer (Cleveland) is headed towards St Louis. I'll ask General Cai to divert them to Cairo. The 10th IN Cav is taking back Portsmouth harbor (Scioto).

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Kentucky/Tennessee:

General Cai did not like Scott's ideas about raiding. That means the rebels will organize the Army of Tennessee sooner rather than later (Joe Johnston's corps is currently part of Beauregard's Army).

The 4th OH Cav (Boone) will shift to Munfordville (Hard), while the 1st OH Cav (Fayette) occupies Bardstown (Nelson). The 7th and 9th IN Mil will hold Lexington. The 2nd OH Bde & 3rd OH Cav, which bore the brunt of the fight at Lexington, will head back to Louisville to join a scratch force under FJ Porter.

Hunter's Division is shifting by river over to Greenville (Muhlenburg) where he wil be joined by Grant and the rest of the Lexington forces (1st OH Bde, 1st OH Vol, 1st IN Vol, 2nd OH Cav. The 1st OH Vol at Louisville, with the 4th IN Mil, will reinforce the 12th IN Mil at Henderson. That allows the 1st IN Mil, IL Vol Bde, and 1st IL Bty C, currently at Henderson, to join Wallace on the way to Clarksville.

Lew Wallace will occupy Clarksville. The 6th IL Cav will attack Gallatin (overriding my objection), and the 4th & 5th IL Cav are moving together past Nashville to Hickman, TN. The 1st WI Mil (Kinsale, IL) will occupy Paris and Henry Ferry.

Gunboat Squadron 1 (USS Pittsburg, USS Baron de Kalb) along with all the transports and the 1st MO Supply train, are splitting of from Foote's fleet and moving over to Benson curve on the Green River. They will be joined there by the OH Gunboat Squadron (USS Ramseur, USS Valley Forge) currently at the Kentucky Confluent.

Lyon will assault Columbus, leaving behind the 7th MO Mil, 4th WI Mil, and 1st IL Btty B at Paducah. They will be joined by the 6th IL Mil from Charleston, MO.

The IL Gunboat Squadron (USS Ticonderoga, USS Savannah) holds Cape Girardeau alone in the face of the rebel Mississippi river fleet (4 Gunboat Squadrons and Louisiana Transports) until the new gunboats from St Louis and Lexington arrive. We only have the Cairo shore batteries to secure this area, but are starting on more at Scott, MO.

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Missouri and West:

The 10th IL Mil and 1st IL Bty C hold Scott, and will attempt to repair the rail line there. the MO Cav Brigade is also returning there. They should be able to deter enemy raiders from using this area. The Lexington Supply train is being sent downriver to Fremont at Cairo.

The 3rd IL Mil (Springfield) will report to General Halleck at St Louis, as will the 1st IN Vol and the Michigan Bde (Alton).

The 2nd MO Mil (Vienna) will join the 27th detachment (13th IL Mil, Waschman's Art.) at Jefferson City. The 4th MO Mil (Lawrence, 2 rgts) is switching assignments with the 11th MO Mil (Ft Leavenworth, 1 rgt).

The 10th IL Cav (St Louis) will rail out to try and catch Pagan's Cavalry at Erie, while the 11th IL Cav (Erie) tries to catch the Pulaski Lancers at Caldwell.

The 3rd US Cav, which is in decent shape, will move out to patrol Englewood, IT. The other regiments, in worse shape, hold Ft Smith (the 3rd IA really should be resting inside the fort, but there were too many other issues to deal with, this one got skipped).

The 63rd Detachment (7th, 10th, & 11th US) is one day's march from Dallas, which is occupied by the 2nd TX Mil.

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Reinforcements, Replacements, Economy:

East
PA - 2 SS, 1 Cav

West
MO - 1 SS
IA - 1 Supply
OH - 2 River Transports

Unassigned
Engineers, Medical
Mid Atlantic - 1 Transport, 1 Brig

Replacements
1 Cavalry
1 Lt Artillery
1 Supply train
1 Service

Economic
10 Steamboats
New Mexico - Medium Industrialization

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Late October 1861 report

Tue Sep 09, 2008 6:46 pm

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General:

The rebels issued 8% bonds and a call for volunteers. That means they probably have about 250,000 new troops in training. We received some new replacements, which were pretty much all absorbed into existing units.

10/25-26 Braxton Bragg, with 11,000 troops assaulted Ft Pickens. Our 3400 man garrison were able to inflict 2800 casualties over two days, before they were forced to surrender.

2 new regiments of cavalry are ready in the northeast (Reading & New York), The 1st IA supply train is ready in Dubuque, and an Army HQ (with Butler's name on it, since he now ranks equal to McClellan) is ready at Washington DC. It will probably be safest if it waits for him there.

General Scott has not yet retired, as was anticipated. I've come up with a solution to the command problem (McClellan), by starting a War Board (a few months early) with General John Wool in charge. Hopefully, we will be able to clear up some of the communications issues we were having.

Naval:

We now have 58 ships involved in foreign trading. Ten ships have returned to Boston and New York.

Dahlgren, with the Monitor, returned to Fort Monroe (I must've forgotten about that order). They came under fire from Pig Point, and took substantial damage, while doing little to disturb the enemy batteries. Transport Squadron #6 was also bombarded on their way to the Rappahannock. They survived, but are in poor shape for continued operations.

Transports in the Carolina rivers were seriously delayed. The Cavalry have not reached Ft Zachary yet. The 2nd Naval were able to make a rendezvous with their transports in the Waccamau River, without giving away their position.

The USS Dacotah is now ready in New York, and will probably be sent to join one of the blockade fleets.

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Norfolk:

The 1st NC and most other forces at Williamsburg retreated to Richmond, joining Lee's Command there. Meagher pushed through to Hanover, not stopping to take Williamsburg from the single militia regiment in the town.

The remainder of the 2nd PA Cav (97 men) successfully escaped from Hanover, and are making their way to Fort Monroe. The 4th PA were attacked by 2 cavalry regiments before they could escape from Louisa. Some survivors made it back to Butler's lines at Fredericksburg. Apparently 200 prisoners were captured.

The 51st detachment captured Suffolk, along with a 12lb artillery battery and a volunteer regiment.

Buchanan's fleet followed Mansfield's transports to the Meherrin River, but we were able to escape back downstream.

The 2nd Maryland Cav arrived safely at James City.

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Potomac:

Jackson took command of the 1st VA Cavalry, and was taking up station in Culpeper when Butler arrived. The rebels retreated back to Manassas. The Laurel Brigade and 4th VA Cavalry evaded Butler's forces in the Wilderness. They are reported to still be operating in the "burned area" between there and Gordonsville.

Ben Butler's corps (27,600) successfully attacked Holmes (15,400) position outside Fredericksburg. They swept in from the west and knocked Holmes off the heights. The Laurel Brigade attempted a slashing attack on the flank and rear of the column as they left the Wilderness, but were driven off. We took 4,800 casualties, the enemy over 7,000, including an artillery battery. Butler captured 1600 prisoners and 2000 weapons. He reports that Holmes has an infantry regiment, a 12lb battery, and a supply train remaining. Joe Hooker captured Fredericksburg, taking another 200 prisoners, at a cost of 300 casualties. He captured 200 supply carts and 130 ammunition crates. Both Butler and Hooker have received public acclaim.

The 1st MD 'Potomac' Cavalry, hearing reports that Army Supply #1 was on the move, decided to ride through the enemy army, rather than around them. They miraculously evaded both Bee's and Bonham's patrols, which had apparently been pulled in both due to anticipated bad weather and cavalry being sent south, and are safe in Montgomery.

McClellan and McDowell's forces have all made their rendezvous with no enemy interference.

Raiding:

The US Cavalry Regiment is safe in Warren, NC, but completely out of supplies. The 3rd PA Cav has safely penetrated the enemy cavalry screen at Roanoke, VA, but will need to return to a base for resupply. The 3rd MD has arrived uneventfully in Culpeper. All enemy forces were driven out of the area, as anticipated.

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Shenandoah:

Maybe it's a good thing that walking over muddy mountains takes so long. Forces at Grafton have been hit by the mumps. We lost over 1400 men there in the last month, mostly from the WV/2nd Bde. Forces to the south continue to struggle towards this point, now dealing with snow in addition to the mud.

The 2nd OH Vol Bde successfully escaped from the vicinity of Marion, and are making their way through Tazewell.

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Kentucky:

Joe Johnston has pulled back to Clarksville. Sidney Johnston is in Nashville, having passed through Gallatin along the way. The rebel staff train, accompanied by cavalry from North Carolina, met him at Nashville. The 6th IL Cavalry was able to evade, and are now shadowing Joe Johnston's corps. The 4th and 5th IL Cav have passed by Zollicoffer's position here (now 7 regiments plus artillery), and are now poised to begin serious raiding operations. The 1st WI Mil has arrived at Henry Ferry.

Porter is consolidating his position and resting his troops (7500) near Lousville, with another 3800 newly trained men from Camp Dick Robinson available. Grant never left Lexington, but the Lexington troops are in the process of landing at Muhlenberg from Benson Curve. With the addition of new brigades to his column, Lew Wallace was only able to march as far as Muhlenburg. He and Hunter will need to reorganize before moving forward. Reinforcements arrived in Henderson. We now have 4000 troops there (2 inf, 1 lt inf, 2 Vol).

The rebel Ohio River fleet decided to fight in the Great Confluent after all. The USS Osage and USS Neosho put their guns and armor to good use. The rebels retreated again, leaving one of their gunboats sunk, and another burning on the riverbank.

Lyon and Hardee fought a meeting engagement outside Columbus. Hardee was reported to have 11,000 troops to Lyon's 14,000. We annihilated one regiment of conscripts, but were force to retreat back to Paducah in the face of the better rested and supplied enemy. Lyon was recognized for his proper handling of the situation, and a promotion is in the works.

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Missouri:

Miserable weather along the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers has delayed movement there as well. Gunboats from St Louis have joined the ones from Illinois at Cape Girardeau. The gunboats from Lexington have passed St Louis, and are struggling downstream.

The 10th IL Cav intercepted Pagan's Cavalry on the way to scout Lexington. They inflicted 300 casualties, taking 100 themselves, but were unable to trap the enemy before bad weather forced a halt to operations. The Pulaski Lancers attempted a rail raid in Union, but were forced back to Vienna by our patrols. There has been some skirmishing across the Gasconade, but nothing of note. Reinforcements have arrived at Jefferson City, nearly doubling the size of the force there (3 volunteer rgts, 2 10lb bttys).

Halleck is consolidating and training forces at St Louis (12 regiments + 1 bty). A Sharpshooters Regiment (14th MO) and Medical company are also being recruited here. The 2nd Pioneers are continuing in this direction, although what they expect to accomplish here is unknown.

Price has pulled back to Fayetteville.

West:

The 3rd US Cav reports that Stand Watie has passed through the area they were patrolling, likely on his way to Panther, AR. Cavalry at Fort Smith razed the depot.

The 2nd TX turned out to be a skeleton force. The 63rd detachment is firmly in possession of Dallas. They captured 50 men in uniform, and rounded up another 150 potential troublemakers.

The 2nd Artillery and 3rd Naval regiment have arrived at Tuscon. The 2nd Artillery continued south to join Sumner at Fort Bliss. The 3rd Naval is headed towards Santa Fe, on their way to Kansas, and eventually St Louis.
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